Category Archives: About the Archives

This category is used for posts that talk more about the people, services, and operation of the archives as a department.

Archives Month Staff Spotlight 2017 – Emily

ArchivesMonthEmily
Emily visiting with Kermit the Frog at the National Museum of American History.

Emily is our next staff member to be featured in the Staff Spotlight for American Archives Month!

First Name: Emily
Title: Assistant Archivist
Where are you from? I was born and raised downstate in Grand Rapids, but my family roots in the Keweenaw stretch back many generations.

Where did you work before coming to Michigan Tech? My last job before coming to Michigan Tech was as a student worker in the curation division at the Bentley Historical Library in Ann Arbor. I also had internships at Keweenaw National Historical Park and the Ada Historical Society.

What is your favorite thing about working at the Michigan Tech Archives? I’d have to say that my favorite part of working here is getting to help people discover new parts of the local story or their family history. That moment when a patron lights up with irrepressible joy makes me just as happy as they are!

What is the most interesting thing you learned while working here? I can’t count all the fascinating tidbits I’ve picked up since I started here. As a genealogist, the most interesting knowledge would probably be the kind that has filled in gaps in my family history. Thanks to our collections, I now know exactly when my maternal ancestors came over from England, for example, and I can also tell you that all the stories about my moonshining paternal relatives were true! In fact, I wrote a blog post about my family’s Prohibition hijinks back in March.

What is your favorite collection? Choosing my favorite collection is a tall order! I think it’s a tie between Brockway Diary Collection (MS-010) and the employment cards from the Calumet & Hecla Mining Companies Collection (MS-002).  

The Riippa Lumber Company sawmill near Winona in January 1977.
The Riippa Lumber Company sawmill near Winona in January 1977.

What is your favorite photograph in CCHI? Picking a favorite photograph is another challenge! One of my top choices is a winter picture of my family’s sawmill in Winona–it really drives home just how much snow we get around here.

“Jeopardy!” publicity photograph taken just before filming the episode.
“Jeopardy!” publicity photograph taken just before filming the episode.

What is one interesting fact about you? When I was twelve, I appeared on “Jeopardy! Kids Week” and won.

Why are the Michigan Tech Archives important to you? The Michigan Tech Archives are important to me because of my love for the Copper Country; there’s nowhere like it and nothing quite so interesting as the story of its past. I’m proud to be part of an organization that helps to keep the history of this remarkable place alive.


Archives Month Staff Spotlight 2017 – Becky

 

This photo was taken at the lighthouse at the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa this past summer. Becky said that while it was a long and steep hike, the view from the top was more than worth it!

For American Archives Month, in addition to offering all of our regular services, we will also be posting special content on our social media platforms. We had a busy day yesterday for #AskAnArchivist Day and we hope to keep fresh content on our Facebook, Twitter, and blog all month long. Archives Month Staff Spotlights are one such example of archives-themed content for the blog, and here is our first one!

First Name: Becky
Title: Student Assistant
Where are you from? Mukwonago, WI
What is your major? Biomedical Engineering
What is your favorite thing about working at the Michigan Tech Archives? My favorite thing about working in the archives is being able to interact with the history of the UP.
What is your favorite collection? My favorite collection isn’t really a collection, but rather a part of a collection. I find the employment cards really cool because a single card can hold so much information for someone.
What is your favorite photograph in CCHI? My favorite photograph is the one where a snow statue appears to be eating a child.
What is one interesting fact about you? One interesting fact about me is that I traveled to South Africa this past summer.
Why are the Michigan Tech Archives important to you? The archives are important to me because they offer a glimpse into a past we might not get to know if it weren’t for the archives.
2014 Winter Carnival Contest
Becky’s favorite photograph, which was the first place winning photograph for the 2014 Winter Carnival Photo Contest. The photograph was taken by Michigan Tech student, Connor Wlodarczak. This statue is titled, “Chilled Delight.”

 


A Conscious Campus: The Conscious Stomach Student Organization at Michigan Tech

Articles of The Conscious Stomach student organization.
Articles of The Conscious Stomach student organization.

Many of our blog posts to date have focused on regional and larger community topics. Today’s blog delves into the campus community, highlighting a relatively short-lived, but very interesting student organization at Michigan Tech.

In the winter of 1976-1977 a group of like-minded students and community members from Michigan Tech, Funky’s Karma Kafe and the Keweenaw Co-op started coming together to talk about food, what options there were for whole and natural foods in the Copper Country, political issues surrounding food, and the improvement of food options within university dining services.

The group applied to the university administration to form an official student organization on campus and held their first meeting on January 8, 1977, calling themselves The Conscious Stomach. According to the group’s constitution and bylaws, the group’s purpose was to “promote the health of the individuals of the student body” and to “gather, organize and distribute information pertaining to the nutritional, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of food.”

The organization’s records helds at the Michigan Tech Archives show that The Conscious Stomach was heavily involved on campus, holding bake sales with food made with whole foods and natural ingredients and distributing information among the student body. The group even supplied the Michigan Tech library with books and magazines on alternative food and lifestyles with titles such as Mother Earth News and Vegetarian Voice. Other major activities undertaken by The Conscious Stomach included hosting a “Trees Again” concert during Winter Carnival (1977), establishing the first non-smoking section within the Memorial Union building, and the first ever Bring A Friend to Food Day in 1978. Also known as the Food Day Conscious Banquet, the event was an attempt to highlight food alternatives and encourage others to taste for themselves a wide variety of options.

Central to The Conscious Stomach’s goals was improving dining services offerings on campus, as well as communication between students and dining services related to the food needs at Michigan Tech. Around the same time as the group’s formation the members also established a Dorm Food Committee. According to a Michigan Tech Lode article from 1977, the Dorm Food Committee was established to:

Photographs from The Conscious Stomach scrapbook.
Photographs from The Conscious Stomach scrapbook.

“gather and publish dorm residents’ criticisms and positive suggestions about improving the food service at the dorm; educate dorm students, cooks, dietitians, and bakers about the nutritional, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of food and the relative advantages that certain foods possess in each of the above aspects; to get the dorms to offer whole and natural foods in addition to the regular menu, to get the bake shop to bake with whole and natural foods, to get dorms to offer main courses and soups for the students who don’t eat meat”

The Dorm Food Committee conducted a survey in the spring of 1977 on dorm food to get a sense of the student perspective. Of the 2,306 registered dorm residents for that semester, the group had a response rate of 29% for all the dorms. The conclusions drawn by The Conscious Stomach Dorm Food Committee was that the dorms showed a “significant interest in whole and natural foods” and they “strongly recommend to the MTU Food Services that easily substituted items be replaced with whole and natural foods.”

The Conscious Stomach student organization continued to be an active group at Michigan Tech at least into the early 1980’s. It isn’t quite clear when the group officially disbanded based on the records housed at the Michigan Tech Archives, but needless to say that some of their activities and initiatives in the late 1970’s have shaped campus today.

C.S. [Conscious Stomach] Favorite Recipes.
C.S. [Conscious Stomach] Favorite Recipes.

Interested in learning more about The Conscious Stomach? Visit the Michigan Tech Archives and view the student organization’s records (MTU-027) on site! The collection includes membership lists, surveys, newspaper clippings, recipes, other printed ephemera and a scrapbook featuring photographs from some of the group’s events and activities. The Archive is open for regular research hours, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, no appointment is necessary. You may also contact the archive directly at (906) 487-2505 or by email at copper@mtu.edu.


Secret Societies of the Copper Country

“First regular communication of Quincy Lodge U.D. [under dispensation] F. & A. M. [Free and Accepted Masons] held at Lodge room in Village of Hancock, June 6th A.D. 1861 A.L. [Anno Lucis: ‘In the Year of Light’] 586. Present, Charles L. Wheeler W.M. [Worshipful Master], Jacob Hougton Jr. S.W. [Senior Warden], Alexander Pope Jr. J.W. [Junior Warden], J.A. Close S.D. [Senior Deacon] pro tem, J.P.M. Butler J.D. [Junior Deacon] pro tem, J.A. Hubbell Secty pro tem, S.S. Robinson Treasr pro tem, A.F. Leopold Tyler pro tem, & Brethern Lodge opened in due form in 3rd degree of Masonry The worshipful Master then read the dispensation granted by the G.M. [Grand Master] of the State of Michigan On Motion a committee of Three consisting of the W.M., S.W., & J.W. was appointed to draft the By Laws for the government of the lodge and report at next regular communication. On Motion Bro. Berd was allowed to occupy the preparation room till first of Sept. 1861. The W.M. appointed Tuesdays & Friday Evenings of each week as stated communications for instruction. On Motion the Lodge closed in harmony. Jay A. Hubbell Secty -pro tem-”
“First regular communication of Quincy Lodge U.D. [under dispensation] F. & A. M. [Free and Accepted Masons] held at Lodge room in Village of Hancock, June 6th A.D. 1861 A.L. [Anno Lucis: ‘In the Year of Light’] 586. Present, Charles L. Wheeler W.M. [Worshipful Master], Jacob Hougton Jr. S.W. [Senior Warden], Alexander Pope Jr. J.W. [Junior Warden], J.A. Close S.D. [Senior Deacon] pro tem, J.P.M. Butler J.D. [Junior Deacon] pro tem, J.A. Hubbell Secty pro tem, S.S. Robinson Treasr pro tem, A.F. Leopold Tyler pro tem, & Brethern Lodge opened in due form in 3rd degree of Masonry. The worshipful Master then read the dispensation granted by the G.M. [Grand Master] of the State of Michigan On Motion a committee of Three consisting of the W.M., S.W., & J.W. was appointed to draft the By Laws for the government of the lodge and report at next regular communication. On Motion Bro. Berd was allowed to occupy the preparation room till first of Sept. 1861. The W.M. appointed Tuesdays & Friday Evenings of each week as stated communications for instruction. On Motion the Lodge closed in harmony.
Jay A. Hubbell Secty
-pro tem-”
Please read on for a blog post from our summer inter, Steve Moray, on fraternal organizations in the Copper Country. ______________________________________________________________________

The Freemasons, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias…secret societies. Many people find them fascinating, but many may also have a misunderstanding of exactly what these secret societies are or what they do. Most “secret societies” are more mundanely referred to as fraternal organizations. Organizations such as these may have a variety of purposes, including social or charitable goals, or insuring the financial well being of members or their families in case of accidents or hard times or any combination of these or related goals.

 

List of Signatures of the first Masonic Lodge in the Copper Country, including Jay A. Hubbell (about halfway down).
List of Signatures of the first Masonic Lodge in the Copper Country, including Jay A. Hubbell (about halfway down).

Since very early on in the history of the Copper Country these organizations have had a presence. Thanks in large part to their portrayal in popular culture, the most well known fraternal organization is likely the Freemasons. And, indeed, they were one of the first secret societies in the Keweenaw. The first chapter of Free and Accepted Masons, the Quincy Lodge No. 135, was established here in the summer of 1861, just after the beginning of the Civil War. That’s less than 20 years after the Treaty of La Pointe ceded the land in the Keweenaw Peninsula to the United States, 15 years after the Quincy Mining Company was established, and just 2 years after the city of Hancock was founded.

 

Some of the Quincy Lodge’s founding members included some names that may sound familiar. The first “Senior Warden” (second in command) of the Lodge was Jacob Houghton Jr., brother to State Geologist Douglass Houghton (Douglass had passed away in 1845). Jacob accompanied his brother on his famous geological survey, and contributed to the report that was responsible for the copper rush in the Keweenaw. The first Secretary (pro tem) was Jay A. Hubbell. Both the town of Hubbell, and Michigan Tech’s now demolished Hubbell Hall were named for the Mason. At the time Hubbell was a Houghton County attorney, and would later be a U.S. Congressman, State Senator, and district court judge. He was instrumental in helping to establish the Michigan School of Mines, which later became Michigan Technological University.

Hubbell Hall - From Copper Country Historical Images
Hubbell Hall – From Copper Country Historical Images

Members of the Freemasons were very often pillars of the community, and membership in such fraternal organizations could be used to make useful political and social connections, as well as to increase one’s social standing. The Michigan Tech Archives has an extensive collection on the Masons in the Copper Country. MS-035, The Copper Country Masonic Lodge Collection consists of 66 boxes related to the Quincy (later Copper Country) Lodge No. 135, Houghton Lodge No. 218, Keweenaw Lodge No. 242, Calumet Lodge No. 271, John Duncan Lodge No. 373 in addition to various other associated groups such as the Order of Molay, the Michigan Grand Lodge, the Royal Arch Masons, and material related to Masonic buildings such as the Houghton Masonic Temple and the Union Building in Calumet (now the headquarters of Keweenaw National Historical Park).

This certifies that the named sister was a member of a Rebekah Lodge that closed, and can be admitted into any new lodge as a member in good standing.
This certifies that the named sister was a member of a Rebekah Lodge that closed, and can be admitted into any new lodge as a member in good standing.

While most people are familiar with the Freemasons, some of the other fraternal organizations operating in the Copper Country may be a little more unfamiliar. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF), for example, were very popular, and in fact, a larger organization than the Masons for much of their existence.The Independent Order of Odd Fellows were formed in Baltimore in 1842, an offshoot of the British Oddfellows organization. The IOOF dedicates itself to charity, it’s purpose to “visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead and educate the orphan”. Of course, the Odd Fellows also used the organization, much like the Freemasons, for fellowship and socialization.

Portrait of an unnamed “Daughter of Rebekah”.
Portrait of an unnamed “Daughter of Rebekah”.

Despite the name, however, “fraternal” organizations weren’t just limited to men. The Odd Fellows became the first of its kind in the United States to admit women in 1851 when the Daughters of Rebekah were created as the Odd Fellows women’s auxiliary organization (both groups would eventually admit both men and women). The archives has a wide variety of records related to the Odd Fellows, including from the Hecla Lodge 90, the Mystic Lodge 109, the Holly Rebekah Lodge, and the Ivy Rebekah Lodge, and many items such as photographs spread throughout our collections. 

By 1890 the Knights of Pythias also had a presence in the Copper Country, despite the organization not even existing until the end of the Civil War, a quarter century earlier. The Knights were similar in organization and purpose to the Masons and Odd Fellows, but while those groups were brought over from Europe, the Knights were originally founded in the U.S. The “F.C.B.” initials you can see in the emblem on the cover of the by-laws stands for the Pythian motto: Friendship, Charity, Benevolence.

A pocket copy of the by-laws of the Lake Superior Lodge, No. 109 of the Knights of Pythias, printed in 1890. From the Wilbert Salmi Collection, MS-601.
A pocket copy of the by-laws of the Lake Superior Lodge, No. 109 of the Knights of Pythias, printed in 1890. From the Wilbert Salmi Collection, MS-601.

The Daughters of the Eternal City were an Italian/Italian American women’s mutual benefit society located in Calumet, but in addition to providing aid to members in need, the Daughters partook in their own share of secret society traditions. While I don’t speak Italian, I am an avid Google Translator. With a little help from Google, my colleague Allison, and a bit of judicious interpretation, part of the ritual described in their rulebook includes this tidbit regarding latecomers: “The sisters who are late, when the meeting is already open, will knock at the door with one distinct stroke and three consecutive strokes. The doorkeeper opens the door saying ‘Rome’. The sister outside will answer ‘Eternal’.” You can’t have a secret society meeting without a secret password.

As you can see, the Copper Country has a long and rich relationship with fraternal organizations, and the Michigan Tech Archives contains a variety of records related to those organizations. Unfortunately this blog post has barely scratched the surface of the wealth of information that could be mined from our various collections. Who knows, maybe this blog post may inspire some current or future historian to enlighten about what the records of these “secret” societies can tell us.


Summer Intern Update

Steve is hard at work assisting a patron with some genealogical research.
Steve is hard at work assisting a patron with some genealogical research.

Here is an update from our summer intern. He’s learned a lot and we are keeping him busy!


Hi everyone, it’s me again, with an update on my first few weeks in the archives. Although it’s only been a short period of time, I’ve seen a lot of friendly faces, both new and familiar. Not only have many visitors come from all over the country to stop in and research their family during their travels, there have even been a few professors stopping in to work on projects (yes, they work during the summer). One of my primary goals when I applied to this internship was to gain a lot of practical experience, and I think that goal is certainly being fulfilled. My first week was spent learning about the archives, and about the different collections that are here, how to locate them, and how they might be useful to patrons. I was also tasked with performing some remote research for a patron, using the digital microfilm reader to collect newspaper articles on the Northern Copper Country professional baseball league from 1907, which included many teams from the Keweenaw and surrounding areas. Seeing other articles from the time, referencing President Theodore Roosevelt, ships wrecking in the Great Lakes, or even articles about how much the locals love ice cream and soda provides an engaging context to what was happening at the time.

Much of my time has been spent shadowing archivists at the reference desk. That means I watch and learn about the procedures and techniques of interacting with patrons and helping them with their inquiries or research. Sometimes I will even take the lead to help patrons understand some of the procedures of the archives’ reading room and getting started searching through some of our databases and collections. Soon I will be taking my own reference shifts. My favorite part of working here is helping patrons with their genealogical research. When we can show someone the house their ancestor lived in on a Sanborn fire insurance map, or an employment card from the mining company that shows exactly how much they were paid, or just hearing the excitement in their voices or the joy on their faces as they uncover information they never knew before.

In the work room, preparing some collections for relocation and cleaning.
In the work room, preparing some collections for relocation and cleaning.

I have also begun to do some of the archives work that goes on behind the scenes. I have performed the accession process for a number of small donations from the Michigan Tech Registrar’s Office. Accessioning is the first step in adding donations to our collections, to establish and record exactly what they are and where they’re located physically in the archives. These donations included a set of Michigan Tech Commencement Programs (including from my own commencement ceremony!) that will likely be my first processing project. Processing a collection includes digging deeper to make sure the items are arranged in an orderly manner and described in order that the material is easily findable and accessible to the public. I recently finished writing up a plan for Lindsay, the University Archivist, to approve so I can get started on the processing procedure. I’m looking forward to working on that, and on helping the archives process a number of other small collections during my time here.


Welcome to Summer Intern Steve Moray

Steve Moray assesses a map of Isle Royale in the archives stacks.
Our new summer archives intern, Steve Moray, assesses a map of Isle Royale in the archives stacks.

On behalf of the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections, in partnership with the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library, we hope you will help us welcome our new archives intern for summer 2017. Steve Moray was selected as the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library Archives Intern after a competitive national call for applicants. While in Houghton, Steve will be assisting with research support services and behind-the-scenes tours in the Michigan Tech Archives, particularly during the busy summer season. He will also be responsible for arrangement and description of several small manuscript collections and assist with developing new processing workflows for our ArchivesSpace implementation. We are very excited to have him on board! Below, please take a moment to get to know Steve as he introduces himself in his own words.


Hello everyone! My name is Steve Moray and I am a graduate student in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s coordinated MA History/MLIS degree program, concentrating in Archives. I graduated from Michigan Technological University in 2012 with bachelor’s degrees in Archaeology and History. I am thrilled and honored to return to my Alma Mater for this incredible internship opportunity at the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. As an alumnus, I am already familiar with the archives and have used the collections in multiple classes during my time at Michigan Tech, including for a research paper on amusement parks in the Keweenaw Peninsula and for my undergraduate thesis on the history, archaeology, and GIS mapping of a historic copper mine on Isle Royale (Island Mine). In addition, my archaeology field school at Cliff Mine and History of the Copper Country classes both contributed to my in depth historical knowledge of the local area.

In 2013 I moved to Milwaukee and got a job as a field archaeologist working all over Wisconsin at a small archaeology firm. The nature of the job kept me away from home during the work week for nine months of the year. After three years, and much soul-searching, I came to the realization that my chosen profession was not fulfilling my passion. I wanted to find a way to incorporate my long time hobby, genealogy, and my love of historical research into a new, stable career that would allow me to come home every night, while also igniting that missing passion in me. I was lucky that Milwaukee had one of the best MLIS programs in the nation, and after some research, I applied for, and was accepted into, the Coordinated MA History/MLIS program.

My professional interests include collections digitization, MPLP (More Product, Less Processing), and history and genealogy reference. The final paper for my Introduction to Modern Archives Administration class at Milwaukee discussed the use of MPLP in digitization projects to balance issues of backlog, access, preservation, authenticity, and constraints of time and funding. This is a subject I am eager to explore further as I continue to develop as a professional. In my History program at UWM I have also taken Research Methods in Local History, which entailed conducting an in depth research project specifically focused on utilizing the March on Milwaukee digital collection and various physical collections of the UW-Milwaukee archives. After graduating from my master’s program I would like to pursue a career as an archivist at a local or state history archival institution, or as an archivist for the National Park Service at a National Historical Park.

I am also a seasoned genealogist with 20 years of research practice and am experienced in a wide variety of records located in both physical and digital repositories. I am currently working on becoming a Certified Genealogist and I would like to use my extensive knowledge and experience not just personally, but in a professional capacity as well.

When I’m not at school or work my hobbies include photography, doing genealogy for myself and friends, exploring the outdoors (especially the waterfalls of the Keweenaw), and reading authors such as Neil Gaiman and Neal Stephenson, among many others.

I will be here until the beginning of the Fall semester, so stop in and say hi, and let me help you with your historical or genealogical research!


For more information on the Friends of the Michigan Tech Library Internship Program or to set up a time to say hello to our new intern, please call Lindsay Hiltunen at (906) 487-2505 or e-mail us at copper@mtu.edu. The Michigan Tech Archives can also be found on Twitter: @mtuarchives.


Behind the Scenes: Windows to History

Class of 1940 Window.
Class of 1940 Window.

If you have ever visited the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections, you might know that the staff are eager to welcome members of the campus and Copper Country community to the reading room. What you might not know, is that we’re equally excited to share information about the reading room itself and the objects that are visible to patrons every day. One of the most beloved aspects of our reading room are the three stained glass windows that adorn the south wall of the space. Each year we field a variety of questions regarding the windows, but today we’re going to reveal many of those secrets, as well as some that have recently come to light for our staff.

The first stained glass window ever installed in the archives’ reading room was the center window celebrating the class of 1940. The window was a created in tandem with the opening of an expanded facility for the University Archives in the Library in 1982, made possible through donations by the Michigan Tech Class of 1940. The window itself was designed by Walter Boylan-Pett of Mohawk. The new facility was celebrated with an open house to the public on August 6, 1982, debuting the window featuring the Michigan College of Mining and Technology school seal. Its original installation on the third floor of the library allowed for natural illumination by ambient light from the exterior of the building. Today, each window on the garden level is backlit by fluorescent lighting to give the illusion of natural lighting, which has the added benefit of making the reading room appear cheerful and sunny.

Michigan Technological University Centennial Window.
Michigan Technological University Centennial Window.

To the right of the Class of 1940 window is our stained glass window celebrating the University’s centennial. Dedicated in 1985 to celebrate the school’s 100th birthday since its founding in 1885, the window features a vibrant green, yellow, and orange pallet.

At the far left of the reading room is the “Window to the Copper Country” stained glass window. Designed by Peg McNinch by commission for the Michigan Tech Archives in the summer of 1988, the window was made “to honor the depth of local historical and natural resources materials” and has, by far, the mosting interesting story to tell of the three windows. The unveiling of the window in 1988 included a dedication by State Director of the Bureau of History, Martha M. Bigelow. The window, which stands at 6.5 x 5.5 feet, features a map of the region as its central focal point while border panels depict the local historical and natural resources for the which the window was designed.

The history of the Copper Country is indebted to the native peoples who occupied and made this area their home long before the establishment of modern mining operations. The Chippewa, Ojibway and Ottawa bands have resided in the Upper Peninsula for nearly 4,000 years, leaving a lasting legacy. The Thunderbird, which occupies a place of prominence at the top of the window is meant to represent a mythical bird believed to cause lightning and thunder while honoring the native peoples of the Upper Peninsula.

Several panels depict the natural resources of the Copper Country and incorporate local materials into the artwork. One panel on the middle-left of the window shows a waterfall representing the many natural waterfalls in the area such, as Douglass Houghton Falls, Hungarian Falls and Jacobs Falls. Local specimens of datolite are embedded into this panel. Another panel at the lower left shows the trillium and thimbleberry, well-known natural plants in the area. The thimbleberry in particular is a favorite of locals and makes excellent jam, which can be found throughout the Copper Country. A third panel on the middle-right depicts Estivant Pines, representing the last stand of virgin white pine in Michigan. Named after Edward A. J. Estivant, a pioneer who purchased the site in the 1870’s, this natural wonder is an amazing site that can be visited just south of Copper Harbor.

Window to the Copper Country.
Window to the Copper Country.

While the majority of the panels depict the aboveground history of the region, the bottom right panel containing a miner’s candle, hat and pick, is meant to commemorate the vast resources underground and the lasting legacy of the mining heritage of the Copper Country.  A quartz crystal, donated by the A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum, is inlaid on the miner’s candle, which represents the earliest form of illumination used by miners while working in the underground mines.

Prominent buildings are represented among the panels to showcase different aspects of the commercial, entertainment, and recreational history of the area. The top left panel depicts the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge. A fixture within the Copper Country, the Mountain Lodge is one of the major resorts in the area. Built in the 1930s under the Civil Works Administration, the resort is located off of U.S. 41 just outside of Copper Harbor and includes a 9-hole golf course.

Like the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge, the Copper Harbor Lighthouse has long been an important building and site in the Upper Peninsula. Built in 1866, the lighthouse marked an important port of shipping on Lake Superior since water transportation was the sole means of accessing the area and moving people, supplies, and equipment until the age of rail transportation. The top right panel depicts the Copper Harbor Lighthouse and this important era in the history of the Copper Country.

Peg McNinch working on the Window to the Copper Country, circa 1988.
Peg McNinch working on the Window to the Copper Country, circa 1988.

During our research into the Window to the Copper Country, we made a very surprising discovery that we’re excited to share with you today. On the bottom center of the window is a panel depicting the Calumet Theater. Meant to symbolize the important role the theater has played since its opening in 1900 as a place of entertainment and social gatherings into today, the panel plays a subtle, yet significant, dual role of commemoration. In December 1913, following the tragic events of the Italian Hall disaster, which left 73 people dead, including 60 children, the dead were brought to the Calumet Theater, which functioned as a temporary morgue. This relationship between the Italian Hall and the Calumet Theater is solidified in the window, which includes a slice of brick imbedded in the panel from Italian Hall. While likely known by departmental staff at the time, this interesting aspect of the window was rediscovered during our research into the windows.

We hope that you enjoyed this one of a kind behind the scenes view of the Archives’ reading room. If you would like to view the windows in person, please visit us anytime during our regular operating hours, Monday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.!



Photo of the Day – May 17, 2017

Photooftheday

 

From the Daily Mining Gazette in 1963: The Redridge Rhythm Ryders Band, carry on a tradition that was started 50 years ago. The young musicians have won considerable acclaim and recognition in the region, recently winning second place in a talent show at the Dee Stadium. Band Director William H. Brinkman plays the banjo.


Call for Volunteers, History Unfolded and Newspaper Project – Summer 2017

The Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections is currently seeking volunteers for a temporary newspaper project. The volunteer project includes participation in History Unfolded, an internationally significant research project administered by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), as well as assisting with upkeep for the Copper Country and Michigan Tech Vertical Files. The volunteer(s) selected will receive training and will gain first-hand experience in microfilm research and vertical file upkeep.

newspaper3History Unfolded, a project of the USHMM in Washington, DC, asks students, teachers, librarians, archivists and community historians throughout the United States to research what was possible for Americans to have known about the Holocaust as it was happening. Participants look in local newspapers for news and opinion pieces about 31 Holocaust-era events and submit articles they find to a national database. As of May 12, 2017, 1,561 participants from across the country have submitted over 9,900 articles from their local newspapers. However, to date only 125 of those articles come from Michigan newspapers. It is the goal of the Michigan Tech Archives volunteer project to make sure that Upper Peninsula news stories are included in the national database. In addition to microfilm research and participation in the History Unfolded project, volunteers will also be expected to assist in clipping and filing newspapers for inclusion in our local vertical file.

The following skills are required:

  • Knowledge of World War II and Holocaust history.
  • Demonstrated analytical and research skills.
  • Ability to follow instructions and work effectively in a team-based environment.
  • Ability to use basic office equipment and to learn new software.

This call is for 1-2 volunteer positions with work hours to take place Monday-Friday, between the hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. An ideal volunteer would be able to commit 10-15 hours per month, although there is flexibility in setting the weekly volunteer hours.  The preferred start date is June 26, to coincide with the university’s second summer session. There will be no compensation or benefits included with this position and the successful candidate(s) will be expected to complete the appropriate volunteer forms for the university.

To learn more about us, please visit our website: http://www.mtu.edu/library/archives/.

Volunteer applications are due by June 12, 2017. Applicants should send a short letter of interest to:

Lindsay Hiltunen, University Archivist
Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections
Attn: History Unfolded Volunteer Project
Van Pelt and Opie Library
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, MI 49931
copper@mtu.edu | (906) 487-2505