Tag Archives: Northland Historical Consortium

Consortium Meeting Held in Ishpeming May 22, 2010

Underground miners at the Cliff iron mine in Ishpeming, ca. 1890s.  Image #MTU012-008-032, Collection MTU-012 Mining Engineering Photo Collection
Underground miners at the Cliff iron mine in Ishpeming, ca. 1890s. Image #MTU012-008-032, Collection MTU-012 Mining Engineering Photo Collection

The Northland Historical Consortium held its Spring 2010 meeting on Saturday, May 22, 2010, at the Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum in Ishpeming, Michigan.

The meeting featured a presentation by Dr. Terry Reynolds on the history of the Cleveland Iron Mining Company and the Iron Cliffs Company, their activity in Ishpeming and at the Cliffs Shaft site, and their role as predecessors of the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company on the Marquette Iron Range.

The day was rounded out with tours of the Cliffs Shaft museum’s buildings, grounds, and interpretive exhibits. Many thanks to Mary Skewis and the volunteers from the museum for a great day!

The Michigan Tech Archives serves as coordinating organization for the Northland Historical Consortium, an informal association of local historical societies, archives and historians in Northeastern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Central and Western Upper Peninsula.  Questions about the group’s activities can be directed to Erik Nordberg at 906-487-2505 or via e-mail at enordber@mtu.edu

Here are a few photographs from the event:

The Cliff Shaft Mining Museum was host for today's meeting of the Northland Historical Consortium.
The Cliff Shaft Mining Museum was host for today's meeting of the Northland Historical Consortium.

 

Michigan Tech history professor Terry Reynolds speaks to the consortium attendees about the history of iron mining in Ishpeming.
Michigan Tech history professor Terry Reynolds speaks to the consortium attendees about the history of iron mining in Ishpeming.
Joanne "Josie" Olson was selected for the Harold and Marcia Betnhardt Award, given by the Northland Historical Consortium for her work in the local heritage community. Josie is active with a number of initiatives and groups, particularly the Ontonagon County Historical Society and the Rockland Historical Society.
Joanne "Josie" Olson was selected for the Harold and Marcia Betnhardt Award, given by the Northland Historical Consortium for her work in the local heritage community. Josie is active with a number of initiatives and groups, particularly the Ontonagon County Historical Society and the Rockland Historical Society.
 
Attendees at the meeting had a wonderful guided tour of the buildings and exhibits operated by the Cliffs Shaft mining museum. The Cliffs company built two reinforced concrete shafthouses early in the Twentieth century. They have a unusual Egyptian obelisk architecture.
Attendees at the meeting had a wonderful guided tour of the buildings and exhibits operated by the Cliffs Shaft mining museum. The Cliffs company built two reinforced concrete shafthouses early in the Twentieth century. They have a unusual Egyptian obelisk architecture.
 
The museum includes three shaft houses. The B shaft is a mirror duplicate of the reinforced concrete A shaft. This photographs shows the more modern C shaft, which operated in the mid-Twentieth century.
The museum includes three shaft houses. The B shaft is a mirror duplicate of the reinforced concrete A shaft. This photographs shows the more modern C shaft, which operated in the mid-Twentieth century.
 
Our tour took us through underground tunnels connecting the "dry" to the C shaft. Tunnels provided nice protection from the harsh winter climate.
Our tour took us through underground tunnels connecting the "dry" to the C shaft. Tunnels provided nice protection from the harsh winter climate.

 

Right near the shaft entrance was a small room which housed a safety man and this rack of brass tags. As the men headed underground they took their numbered tag with them. As they finished their shift and came to the surface they returned their tag to this rack. During an emergency this was the easiest way to note any missing men.
Right near the shaft entrance was a small room which housed a safety man and this rack of brass tags. As the men headed underground they took their numbered tag with them. As they finished their shift and came to the surface they returned their tag to this rack. During an emergency this was the easiest way to note any missing men.

 

 

 

Touring "the dry" building - where miners changed clothes (and left their work clothes to dry until their next shift). Baskets on pulleys were used to store clothes amongst the rafters.
Touring "the dry" building - where miners changed clothes (and left their work clothes to dry until their next shift). Baskets on pulleys were used to store clothes amongst the rafters.