Archives—March 2015

A Brief History of Michigan Tech’s University Policy Office: How Lean Methodologies Helped Pave the Way

 

lean
Sometimes continuous improvement results can take some time to materialize. But it’s important to remember to focus on the goals you’re trying to accomplish, and to trust that lean process improvement methods can and do result in reaching the tangible goals that we have in our work.

In 2012, as part of a grant Michigan Tech received through the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service [http://www.fmcs.gov/internet/], we were able to bring consultants to campus to help us to continue on our lean journey as a University. Our grant application had proposed an innovative approach to enhancing relations between management and union-represented staff via a rigorous series of Lean training sessions. Lean as a management method is particulary well-suited to accomplishing such a goal, because it is an approach that focuses on the value of each employee, at all levels and within all units. We believed that our proposal would contribute to improving communication and relations between employees at all levels across campus.

I was a co-PI on this grant, and participated as a “student” in most of the training sessions. One of the exercises we were asked to do was to facilitate a kaizen (“improvement”) event to solve a challenging process issue in our work. Having recently taken on policy administration at the University, I had become aware of many areas within the policy development process that seemed to cause confusion for customers (policy developers) and for the campus community in general.

We assembled a small group of individuals that included me, and 3 or 4 additional people who served as facilitators, subject matter experts, and customers. From this single kaizen event, we were able to identify some key improvements that needed to happen:

We needed a dedicated staff member who was primarily responsible for overseeing policy at the University.

  1. We needed to critically review the current policy development process, and identify ways we could eliminate wasteful or unnecessary steps.
  2. We needed a new website, that included tools for policy developers as well as some “educational” pieces about what policy is (and isn’t).
  3. We needed to continually educate the university community on the policy development process, and provide some outreach and support to policy developers along the way.

Most of these goals hinged on the need to hire that staff member. I am now pleased to say that in 2014, after a lot of thought and planning, we were able to hire a University Policy Coordinator, Lori Weir, who has jumped right in to making these kaizen-originated goals a reality. She is also constantly looking for ways to continuously improve how we manage policies at Michigan Tech, and I’m looking forward to working with her to realize our vision of what a Policy Office should be.

Thank you for visiting our new website, and please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions, suggestions, or would like help getting started on a new policy.



New Policy Announced

3/18/2015 – The Human Resources Office issued Policy 2.6020 Hiring for Work Outside the United States.

This new policy supports University compliance and accountability with U.S. and foreign country tax laws and regulations when hiring individuals to perform work outside the United States.  All departments who may need to hire individuals to work outside the country should familiarize themselve with this policy.