World Water Day Poster Award Winners

World Water Day was celebrated at Michigan Tech on March 20 – 23, 2017 with a focus on Wastewater.  As part of the festivities, students took part in a poster competition.  Here is a listing of the winners:

Christa Meingast
Meingast is a PhD student in Environmental Engineering

1st Place ($250): Christa Meingast
“High-Tech Analysis of Low-Cost, low-Tech Methods for Sustainable Class A Biosolids Production: Set up and Initial Pilot-Scale Data”

Mohammad Samady
Samady is a MS student in Civil Engineering
2nd Place ($150): Mohammad Khalid Samady
“Drought Forecast Modeling and Assessment of Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change on Lower Colorado River”
Mugdha Priyadarshini
Priyadarshini is a MS student in Environmental Engineering
3rd Place ($100): Mugdha Priyadarshini
“Factors Affecting Fish Mercury Concentration in Inland Lakes”
Coursework/Informational:1st Place ($250): Michelle Nitz, Noah Bednar, Bruce Carlstrom, Grace Kluchka
“Reducing Sewer Corrosion Through Holistic Urban Water Management”

2nd Place ($150): Michael Candler, Emily Shaw, Nicole Wehner, and Bradley Wells
“Regulations and Their Role in Human and Environmental Risk Management: Microplastics in the Great Lakes”

3rd Place ($100): Kyle Hillstead, Julianna Mickle, and Caryn Murray
“Using the Four R’s in the design of De Facto Potable Reuse Water for Enhanced Public Health”


Civil Engineering Undergrad Chosen for SURF Award

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program funds undergraduate students to conduct research under the guidance of a Michigan Tech faculty member.  Darian Reed, an undergraduate student in Civil Engineering, has been chosen as a 2017 SURF Award recipient.  He will be working with Dr. Pasi Lautala.

 

Evaluation of Methods to Record Head Orientation in Driving Simulator and In-Vehicle Study Environments

This project concentrates on two aspects; development of a naturally wearable head orientation sensing device using Arduino™ hardware, and development of a methodology that allows a scientifically validated comparison and interpretation of head orientation measurements in both environments. This project is a continuation of the research Aaron Dean performed in his 2016 SURF. It will benefit the outcomes of the current projects such as the current large-scale behavioral study of driver behavior at highway-rail grade crossings that Dr. Pasi Lautala and Dr. Myounghoon Jeon are currently working on . The research uses data from the 2nd Strategic Highway Research Program Naturalistic Driving Study (SHRP2), but will also allow us to make conclusions on the similarity of head orientation measurements in naturalistic and simulated environments. Overall, the results should allow us to improve the accuracy of modeling driver behavior using driving simulators. In addition, it will standardize the data collection platform in future projects, such as expansion of our current study to naturalistic (real-life) environment and other studies requiring a rotational head tracking component.

reed


Cleaning Dirty Water Competition Winners Announced

Winning SEEN team & Dr. MartyAuer-1
The winning team of Joseph Doyle, Kyle Mischler, and Jeremy Luebke pictured with judge Dr. Marty Auer

 

The winners of the Cleaning Dirty Water Competition are no surprise! They are three members of the Society of Environmental Engineering student chapter at Michigan Tech–seniors no less— Joseph Doyle, Kyle Mischler, and Jeremy Luebke.

They had stiff competition from the runner up team “The Insolubles”— three students from a high school chemistry class at Hancock High School (Mike McParlan, Murphy Mallow, Shannon Nulf) taught by a Michigan Tech grad.

Other teams that competed included Quantum Huskies, a group of international students from MTU Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Whiz Kids– a group of three 8th graders from Lake Linden-Hubbell Middle School, and three members of the Copper Country Recycling Initiative task force.

The competition was held in recognition of World Water Day, March 22, 2017. This year’s theme is wastewater, hence the competition!

Event coordinator, Joan Chadde, made the wastewater right before participants’ eyes, as they listed all of the household items that go down the drain. Each team was given a cup of wastewater and directed to clean it as best they could using only the materials provided– screen, sand, gravel, activated charcoal and alum. After 20 minutes, the results were in!

Chadde is the director of the Michigan Tech Center for Science & Environmental Outreach and a member of the World Water Day planning committee.

Dr. Marty Auer, a local wastewater treatment expert from Michigan Tech, served as judge.

All members of the winning team received $25 MTU gift certificates, which they generously handed off to the 2nd place Hancock High School students, explaining ‘they didn’t have time to spend it, since they’d be leaving Houghton soon with graduation just a few weeks away!’

Globally, 2 billion people are without clean drinking water and 3 billion are without wastewater treatment.

After treatment, wastewater is a valuable resource that can be returned to cities for drinking water!

Michigan Tech’s World Water Day events are sponsored by the following Michigan Tech departments and research centers: The Great Lakes Research Center, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, the Ecosystem Science Center, the Sustainable Futures Institute, Visual and Performing Arts, and The Center for Science and Environmental Outreach.

CEE international students
CEE International Graduate Students
CopperCountryRecycling
Copper Country Recycling Initiative task force
Hancock HS team
Hancock HS team – 2nd place
LakeLinden-HubbellGr.8team
Lake Linden – Hubbell 8th grade team

Detroit HS Students Natural Resource & Engineering Explorations

CIMG5884

High school students in Detroit & Wayne County will have the opportunity to explore environmental science & engineering majors at Michigan Tech this summer.  This will be the 3rd consecutive year that this program will be offered to up to 20 students selected to participate.

Students will participate in many outdoor activities during their 6 day trip to the UP, including: ID and measure trees, collect frog data, sample aquatic life aboard a Lake Superior research vessel, examine plankton, drive a ROV, design a process to clean water and touring the campus of MTU.

The program will be held from June 26 – July 1 and the deadline for students to apply is March 20th.

How to apply

  • Complete application form online 2017 Michigan Tech-Upper Peninsula Trip Application
  • Describe what you hope to gain from the experience and your previous experience with natural resources and/or engineering
  • Email or mail 2 letters of recommendation (from non-family members; one from a teacher) to:

Joan Chadde jchadde@mtu.edu

115 GLRC – Michigan Technological University

1400 Townsend Drive

Houghton, MI 49931

Coordinated by Michigan Tech Center for Science & Environmental Outreach


Winter Accepted to the ASI Program

BenWinter

Benjamin Winter, a PhD candidate in Civil Engineering, has recently been selected to participate in this year’s Advanced Studies Institute (ASI) at the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). The ASI is a 3-week program where multi-disciplinary teams of three doctoral and/or postdoctoral students work on challenging problems related to national security. Under the guidance of LANL mentors, teams develop research proposals to sell their solutions to these problems. The program culminates with team presentations on their solution concepts to a committee of LANL staff and program managers for critical review. During the program, students attend a daily technical and professional development lecture series and work on their team research topics.


Remembering Harbans Singh

On August 27, 2016, our father and Michigan Tech grad from the Class of 1962, Harbans Singh, left this beautiful earth. Our father was a great man and a once in a generation business man.

He very fondly remembered his time in Houghton and made sure we remembered that he received a great education and wonderful experience at Michigan Tech. His dealings with the Deans and Presidents were great. He was the first man to graduate with a turban from your school. He was super proud of that.

In 1960, our father came from India to the U.S. with no money. From California, he ended up at Michigan Tech at a time when he was unhappy and unsure he would succeed in America. Michigan Tech was a great experience, and he met many wonderful friends and teachers. He completed his degree very confidently.

After his Civil Engineering degree in 1962, our father worked for the State of Illinois until he founded and created Eagle Grips, the world’s largest producer of custom hand gun grips.

Tej M. Singh, MD, MBA
Chief, Vascular Surgery
Director, Mitchell Vascular Center
Palo Alto Medical Foundation


Harbans Singh left India in 1960 to pursue a better life. He enrolled at Michigan Tech, graduating as the first Sikh at the school in 1962 with a BS in civil engineering. He married Ms. Indira Sodhi in 1965 and started Art Jewel Enterprises (aka Eagle Grips) in 1978. Eagle Grips became a large international leader in custom, handmade grip production. His family considered him to be a wonderful role model, ultimate doer, optimist, and advisor.

Harbans Singh

Harbans Singh


Railroad Careers Night February 22, 2017

REAC logoThe Michigan Tech Railroad Engineering and Activities Club (REAC) is hosting Railroad Careers Night at 7 p.m. tonight (Feb. 22) in the DHH Ballroom.

Students from any discipline and any year are encouraged to stop in for free pizza and stimulating conversation with representatives from the rail industry. We are expecting about 10 companies, including Class 1 railroads, consultants and suppliers to be available for casual conversation in a relaxed atmosphere — a perfect follow-up to the mad pace of Career Fair.

By David Nelson.


Veronica Webster on the Oroville Dam Spillway

Veronica Webster
Veronica Webster

YubaNet.com quoted Veronica Webster (CEE) on the hydraulic structural problems underlying the erosion of the Oroville Dam spillway in California.

In for the Long Haul at Oroville Dam Says Water Resources Expert

February 15, 2017 – Civil engineer Veronica Webster studies long-term trends for assessing flood risk at Michigan Technological University. She says that for the Oroville Dam, the immediacy of the problem is related to longer running issues.

Many of our hydraulic structures are likely under designed. —Veronica Webster

Webster is an associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan Tech and is a recent recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award to study flood frequency and risk analysis.

Read more at YubaNet.com, by Michigan Technological University.


2017 Moisseiff Award from ASCE

Daniel Dowden
Daniel Dowden

Daniel M. Dowden, Patricia Clayton, Chao-Hsien Li, Jeffrey Berman, Michael Bruneau, Laura Lowes and Keh-Chyuan Tsai have been selected by the Structural Engineering Institute to receive the 2017 Moisseiff Award “For the paper, “Full-Scale Pseudodynamic Testing of Self-Centering Steel Plate Shear Walls,” Journal of Structural Engineering, January 2016.”

The award ceremony will take place during the Structures Congress 2017 in Denver, CO, April 7, 2017.

The award recognizes important papers dealing with the broad field of structural design, including applied mechanics as well as the theoretical analysis, or constructive improvement, of engineering structures such as bridges and frames, of any structural material.

The Structural Engineering Institute is part of ASCE, the American Society of Civil Engineers.


Taylor Wiegand is an ACEC Scholarship Recipient

Taylor Weigand
Taylor Wiegand

A Michigan Tech student has been selected by the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) of Michigan as a 2016-2017 scholarship recipient. The scholarship program aims to promote the profession by providing financial support to those pursuing careers in engineering and surveying. The applicants are evaluated on: work experience, extra-curricular & community activities, references, GPA and a written essay.

Congratulations to Taylor Wiegand, a senior in Civil Engineering, for being selected!