Tag Archives: Minors

Are the rules for minors changing?

In Fall 2016, the rules for all minors will be changing. Students will be able to double count all minor classes with major classes (no more “6 credits must not double count, etc. etc.), but you will no longer be able to use the same classes for multiple minors.  Some departments may choose to change the courses required for their  minor because of these rule changes.

If you are planning to pursue a minor in any department then it is very important that you add the minor *this* year. Students who have added a minor by the end of this year will be able to use the existing rules.

We will be allowed to move you to the newer rules if the new rules benefit you, but after next fall we will *not* be allowed to move you back to the older rules.


What are the current rules for the Minerals Processing Minor?

As of Fall 2015, there will be new rules for the Minerals Processing Minor.  The requirements are shown at this link:

http://www.chem.mtu.edu/~fmorriso/advising/MineralsProcessingMinorCMMPChangesFall2014.pdf

These changes will be up on the Registrar’s website by 10th week of Spring 2015.  Students taking the minor should take GE 2301 for their mineralogy choice, which is open to CMMP students and allows for fewer prerequisites.


May I minor in business?

Unfortunately, Michigan Tech does not offer a minor in business administration.  You may minor in economics (see the Registrar’s webpage), or you may prepare yourself for the masters in business administration (MBA).  Contact the MBA advisor to find out the current requirements for admission to the Michigan Tech MBA program. In recent times prerequisites have included having taken the following as an undergraduate:

  • Accounting Principles I (BA2300 or BA2330 or equivalent)
  • Economics Principles (EC2001 or equivalent)
  • Economic Decision Analysis (EC3400 or equivalent OR Finance (BA3400)
  • Statistics (BA2100 or MA2720 or equivalent)

Another way to pursue your interest in business is to double major (or become dual degree) in business.  For details, please contact the undergraduate advisor for the School of Business and Economics.


What should I minor in?

Asking what you should minor in is closely related to asking what you should major in.  The answer is:  whatever you like.

To help you decide what you would like to study, here is a list of minors that many Chemical Engineering majors find appealing.  Details of the requirements for each minor may be found on the Registrar’s Degree Services page.  There are also trifold handouts on the Advising Handout page.

Chemical Engineering Minors These minors are administered in the Department of Chemical Engineering.  They are matched with career paths in chemical engineering; more information on each minor may be found at the links supplied below.

Minors in Related Fields

  • Mathematics – Chemical engineering majors may obtain a minor in mathematics by taking only 6 additional credits.  Students who are grad-school bound are advised to take the math minor.
  • Chemistry – Chemistry is what makes a chemical engineer different from other types of engineers; minoring in chemistry boosts your chemistry capabilities.
  • Pharmaceutical Chemistry – A career in pharmaceuticals manufacturing is prepared for by taking the minor in pharmaceutical chemistry.
  • Biological Sciences – Many modern manufacturing processes have a strong biological component; graduates can prepare for these types of careers by minoring in biological sciences.
  • Data Acquisition and Industrial Control – This minor, offered in the School of Technology, provides additional preparation in hands-on control methods.
  • Economics – A career in engineering management is boosted by additional economics preparation.
  • Foreign Languages – A career in international business or manufacturing is boosted by foreign language study.

Minor in Data Acquisition and Industrial Control

For students who are interested in focusing on process control and other issues related to data acquisition within chemical engineering, it would be valuable to minor in Data Acquisition and Industrial Control.  The Michigan Tech Minor in Data Acquisition and Industrial Control is offered by the School of Technology and in 2014-15 has the following requirements (16 credits total):

Minor in Data Acquisition and Industrial Control

Required courses (6 cr)

  • EET 3131 Instrumentation (3) (spring class) OR
  • EET 4253 LabVIEW Programming for Data Acquisition (3)
  • EET 3373 Introduction to Programmable Controllers (3) (fall class)

Choose one course from this list (3-4 cr):

  • EE 2112 Electric Circuits II (4)
  • EE 3010 Circuits and Instrumentation (3) (recommended for CM majors)
  • EET 1411 Basic Electronics (4)

Choose 6-7 credits from this list:

  • CM 3310 Process Control (3)
  • EET 4141 Microcomputer Interfacing (4)
  • EET 4144 Real-Time Robotics Systems (4)
  • EET 4147 Industrial Robotic Vision Systems (4)
  • EET 4311 Advanced Circuits & Controls (4)
  • EET 4373 Advanced Programmable Controllers (4)
  • ENVE 3502 Environmental Monitoring and Measurement Analysis (3)
  • GE 4250 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing (3)
  • MEEM 3000 Mechanical Engg Lab (2)
  • MEEM 4701 Analytical & Experimental Modal Analysis (4)
  • SU 4003 GIS Technology Fundamentals (1)
  • SU 4010 Geospatial Concepts, Technologies and Data (3)
  • UN 4000 Remote Sensing Seminar (1-2)

You must see an advisor in the School of Technology to add this minor.  For more on minors that may be beneficial in the educational path of a chemical engineer, please see a departmental advisor.


Which linear algebra and differential equations classes should I take?

You have three options for linear algebra:  MA 2320, MA 2321, and MA 2330.

You have four options for differential equations:  MA 3520, MA 3521, MA 3530, and MA 3560.

If you plan to take linear algebra and differential equations in the same semester, then you must take the accelerated (7 week) versions of these classes:  MA 2321 (2 cr) and MA 3521 (2 cr).  MA 2321 is offered track A and MA 3521 is offered track B during the fall and spring semesters.  The advantage with the accelerated classes is that they allow you to complete both classes in one semester.  This is important if you plan to start junior CM classes in the next semester, as you must be done with all of your math to start taking junior CM classes.  The disadvantage with the accelerated classes is that the course material comes very quickly, and for this reason we do not recommend the accelerated classes to students who have struggled with math classes in the past or who feel they need more time to grasp math concepts.

If you plan to take linear algebra and differential equations in different semesters, then you can take either MA 2320 (2 cr) or MA 2330 (3 cr) in the first semester and then either MA 3520 (2 cr) or MA 3530 (3 cr, fall semester) or MA 3560 (3 cr, spring semester) in the second semester. There is additional course material in the three credit versions.  You may read the course descriptions by clicking on the CRN when doing a class search in Banweb or searching for course descriptions on the Registrar’s Office webpage.

If you have struggled in your previous math classes then we recommend the semester long, two credit classes (MA 2320 and MA 3520).

If you are interested in a math minor and/or pursuing an engineering graduate degree then we recommend the semester long, three credit classes (MA 2330 and MA 3530/3560).  The extra credits from the three credit math classes can be used towards your technical electives or free electives.  See the ChE advisor for more information on applying these additional credit towards either of these areas of your degree audit.



What are the requirements for the minor in alternative energy technology?

To obtain the minor in alternative energy technology, you must take 16 credits from an approved list of courses.  Of these credits, 10 credits may double count with your major requirements; six credits of upper division credits must not double count with your major or with any other minor (except as free elective).  For the specific rules for this minor, see our advising handout on the minor in alternative energy technology.


What are the requirements for the minor in minerals processing?

To obtain the minor in minerals processing, you must take 16-19 credits from an approved list of courses.  Of these credits, 10-13 credits may double count with your major requirements; six credits must not double count with your major or with any other minor (except as free elective).  For the specific rules for this minor, see our minerals processing brochure.


What are the requirements for the minor in polymer science and engineering?

To obtain the minor in polymer science and engineering, you must take 16-7 credits from an approved list of courses.  Of these credits, 10-11 credits may double count with your major requirements; six credits must not double count with your major or with any other minor (except as free elective).  For the specific rules for this minor, see our minor in polymer science and engineering brochure.