Category Archives: Research

Assessing the Binding Capabilities of Bromodomain-Containing Protein 9

Sarah Hopson (Advisor- Dr. Martin Thompson)

Doctoral Student, Department of Chemistry,Michigan Technological University

Monday, March 2, 2015-9:00 am- Admin 404

Abstract

Post-translational modifications of histones, such as the acetylation of lysines, play an importantrole in regulating transcription. Histone tails have a large proportion of positively-charged residues, which create electrostatic interactions with the negatively-charged DNA backbone. Lysine acetylation is thought to weaken these interactions, because it neutralizes lysine’s positively-charged side chain.

Proteins recognize the acetylated lysines using bromodomains; bromodomains are acetylated lysine “readers” and play a critical role in modulation of gene expression. Of the 46 bromodomain-containing proteins in the human proteome, 15 function as transcriptional regulators and 8 function as chromatin remodelers. Nearly all of the other bromodomain proteins influence transcription in some manner (histone acetyltransferase, transcription repressor, transcription initiation, etc.). Due to their significant influence on transcription, mutations of bromodomains are often linked with cancers.

Bromodomain-containing protein 9 (BRD9) has not yet been studied. The aim of this proposed research is to determine the specificity and affinity of BRD9 toward acetyl-lysine sites on the tails of the four core histone proteins.

A high-throughput examination of possible histone interactions with the bromodomain of BRD9 will be conducted using a modified SPOT array. The peptides demonstrating the strongest interactions with the bromodomain will be synthesized using standard Fmoc peptide synthesis. A quantitative examination of the binding affinities of these peptides to the bromodomain, the bromodomain and DUF3512 (domain of unknown function), and the full length BRD9 will be conducted using isothermal titration calorimetry. The results will be compared to determine how the surrounding amino acid sequences affect the bromodomain’s binding capabilities.


Chemistry-themed Student Research Symposium at NMU, April 11, 2015

The Upper Peninsula Section of the American Chemical Society is now soliciting abstract submissions for the Student Research Symposium, which will be held at NMU’s New Science Facility in Marquette on Saturday, April 11, 2015.

The purpose of the event is to provide a venue for students to present their research in chemistry, chemical engineering and related fields. This symposium will be an excellent opportunity for students, faculty and the community at large to learn about the interesting research being conducted in the UP. This year the initiative will see the participation of presenters from schools within the Northeast Wisconsin local section.

Poster abstracts can be submitted online. The deadline for abstract submission is March 15. There is no registration fee.

Cash awards to the best posters will be given, and every participant will receive a gift from the UP local section.

Questions should be directed to Loredana Valenzano (lvalenza@mtu.edu), UPLS 2015 Chair.

From Tech Today.


Proposals in Progress

PI Xiaohu Xia (Chem), “Facile Removal of Surface Ligands from Supported Platinum-Group Metallic Nanocrystals,” American Chemical Society

PI Loredana Valenzano (Chem), “Bringing New Efficiencies in Petroleum Refining Processes: A Quantum Chemical Investigation of Novel Porous Materials and Metal Oxide Surfaces for Olefin and Paraffin Separation,” American Chemical Society

PI Lanrong Bi (Chem/BRC), “Buckyballs-Based Mitochondrial Drug Delivery System for the Prevention and Treatment of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury,” US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH

PI Marina Tanasova (Chem), “Discovering Probes to Overcome Cancer Resistence to DNA Alkylating Chemotherapy by High Throughput Evaluation of Polymerase Inhibition,” US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH

PI Lanrong Bi (Chem/BRC) and Co-PI Qinghui Chen (KIP/BRC), “Target Mitochondrial Fusion Process: Engineering of a Nanoparticals-Based Mitochondrial Drug Delivery Platform,” US Department of Health and Human Services-NIH

PI Martin Thompson (Chem), “Development of a Biological Platform to Study Histone Modifications,” NSF

PI Lynn Mazzoleni and Co-PI Marina Tanasova (Chem), “Collaborative Research: The Role of Inorganic Salts in Functionalization and Fragmentation of Isoprene Oxidation Product—A Molecular-Level Investigation,” NSF

PI Tarun Dam (Chem), “Role of Glycoconjugate Scaffolds in Lectin Recognition,” NSF

PI Haiying Liu and Co-PI Ashutosh Tiwari (Chem), ” BODIPY-Based Ratiometric Near-Infared Fluorescent Probes for Zinc(II) and Active Oxygen Species,” NSF


Proposals in Progress

Haiying Liu (Chem), “Point-of-Care Rapid Detection by Label Free Cell and Nucleic Acid Assays,” Oakland Univeristy

Lynn Mazzoleni (Chem), “Collaborative Research: Nitrogen Partitioning and Evolution of Particulate Organic Nitrogen in Peat Fire Emissions,” National Science Foundation

Rudy Luck (Chem), “SusChEM: Using Abundant First Row Transition Metals to Accomplish Cross-Coupling for the Synthesis of Specific Drugs,” National Science Foundation


Poster Presentation: Ning Chen

Dr. Pat Heiden’s student, Ning Chen, presented at the 42nd Central ACS Regional Meeting in Indianapolis IN in June 2011 as well as at the 243rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting in Anaheim CA in March 2011. Here are some photos of Ning with his poster:

42nd Central ACS Regional Meeting243rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting in Anaheim CA in March 2011

ACS meetings are an excellent opportunity for students! Reach 12,000 chemical professionals at each 2012 national meeting or at other events throughout the year, including regional meetings.


Atmospheric Aerosols at PICO Mountain Research Observatory

Dr. Lynn Mazzoleni, an assistant professor of chemistry, is currently at the top of Mt. Pico, an extinct volcano in the Azores. She’s working on understanding aerosols’ chemistry and how they interact with sunlight.

Dr. Mazzoleni checked with us recently and shared a photo she took from the ferry as she arrived on day one.  On that particular day the mountain was mostly free of clouds:

Mt. Pico

Learn more about the project by reading “Michigan Tech Researchers to Study Atmospheric Aerosols at PICO Mountain Research Observatory.”

Learn more about Dr. Mazzoleni and her research.