Category Archives: Psychology

Transdisciplinary: Working Across the Campus

Michigan Technological University’s transdisciplinary researchers reach across disciplines and institutional boundaries to solve complex problems that are bigger than a single specialized field.

Kelly Steelman, an assistant professor of cognitive & learning sciences, says diversity is good for problem-solving. If you only have a spoon, the only food you’ll want to eat is soup.

“The more tools you have available to your research team, the more likely you are to consider a variety of solutions and not get stuck always trying to use the same approach to every problem… The more perspectives we bring to the table, the better opportunity we have to create innovative and transformative solutions.”

Read the full story on the Michigan Tech News Website.



Students Inducted into the National Honor Society in Psychology

IMG_8054The Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences inducted seven new members into Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology: Glory Creed, Elizabeth Kelliher, Abigail Kuehne, Mariah Sherman, Kay Tislar, Samantha Verran, and Kira Warner. The induction ceremony took place at the Harold Meese Center on Sunday, December 3.  The Michigan Tech Chapter of Psi Chi is led by Halie Hart (President) and Caden Sumner (Treasurer) and advised by Dr. Kelly Steelman.


Halie Hart Receives Departmental Scholar Award

Every year, each academic department nominates one student to represent their department as its Departmental Scholar. The Provost’s Award for Scholarship is given to a senior who best represents student scholarship at Michigan Tech. This outstanding student is considered excellent not only by academic standards, but also for participation in research scholarship activity, levels of intellectual curiosity, creativity, and communication skills.

Halie Hart is exactly the kind of student that exemplifies Michigan Tech, our mission, and our department scholars. Halie is majoring in Psychology and minoring in Law and Society. Her intellectual curiosity that drives her to master material, her problem solving skills, and her discipline have made her an excellent student and scholar in the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences. These feats alone would be impressive. However, they are even more impressive given that Halie is at the top of her class in terms of  GPA while also being a college athlete as member of the volleyball team. We expect great things from her going forward, as she plans to continue her education and has the potential to be an outstanding scholar at the graduate level as well.

Halie is a natural leader. Halie was recently inducted into Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. She has since taken on the role of President in both Psi Chi and the MTU student organization Association of Psychology Students (APS). As with most student orgs, they have peaks and valleys in terms of organized activities, student commitment, etc. Halie is working hard to revitalize both organizations and provide quality programming in the upcoming semesters. Dr. Steelman, the advisor to these organizations, stated that Halie is breathing new life into these groups  in a way that she has not seen from another executive officer in her time as advisor. Congratulations, Halie!


Dr. Myounghoon “Philart” Jeon Publishes Handbook

PhilartpicDr. Myounghoon “Philart” Jeon, Associate Professor in the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences and the Department of Computer Science, published his first handbook titled “Emotions and Affect in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction” with Elsevier publishing company on April 5th, 2017.

Emotions and Affect in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction is a complete guide for conducting affect-related research and design projects in H/F and HCI domains. Introducing necessary concepts, methods, approaches, and applications, the book highlights how critical emotions and affect are to everyday life and interaction with cognitive artifacts. The text covers the basis of neural mechanisms of affective phenomena, as well as representative approaches to affective computing, Kansei engineering, hedonomics, pleasurable product design, and emotional design.

Dr. Jeon is the founding director of the Mind Music Machine Lab. He also serves as a Director of the Center for Human-Centered Computing at the Institute of Computing and Cybersystems at Michigan Tech. His research focuses on HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) and HRI (Human-Robot Interaction), including Auditory Displays, Affective Computing, Assistive Technologies, Automotive User Interfaces, and Aesthetic Computing. His research has yielded more than 150 publications across top peer reviewed journals and conference proceedings. His research is currently supported by NIH (National Institutes of Health), DOT (Department of Transportation), FRA (Federal Railroad Association), Hyundai Motors Company, Equos Research Co., LTD., and MTTI (Michigan Tech Transportation Institute). Dr. Jeon teaches Affective Design and Computing, Human Factors, Human FactPhilartors II: Multimodal Design and Measures, Human-Robot Interaction, and Human-Centered Design, among others. He serves as an Associate Editor of MIT Press Journal, Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments and Affective Design Technical Committee of International Ergonomics Association (IEA). He has recently guest-edited journal special issues in “subliminal perception” (Presence) and “social cars and connected vehicles” (Pervasive and Mobile Computing), “arts and aesthetics in VR (Presence), and “sonic information design” (Ergonomics in Design). He actively works in international conferences – chairing programs and sessions, organizing workshops, and serving as program committee in AutomotiveUI, ICAD, HFES, CHI, MobileHCI, UbiComp, and PersuasiveTech.


Recent Psychology Graduate to Present Work at Conference

Brittany EricksonBrittany Erickson, a 2016 graduate of the Psychology program, was selected to present her work that stemmed from a project she created in Dr. Shane Mueller’s Research Methods and Statistics course last spring. The conference is for The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), who will hold their 44th Biennial Convention this fall in Indianapolis, Indiana.

STTI represents nurses and is the single largest group of healthcare professionals in the world. Their goal is to provide introduction and access to new healthcare knowledge and resources. Erickson’s study focused on the risk factors and consequences of occupational burnout among nurses. Some questions that are quantitatively and qualitatively addressed are: “How is their clinical decision making affected by burnout?” and “What are the professional and personal ramifications?”

Her poster will be displayed on-site and will also be included in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository to be used as a resource for continuing nursing education after the conference.


Brittany Turner, Psychology, participates in Undergrad Research Symposium

IMG_2510Brittany Turner’s research, Assessing the Impact of Age-Related Declines in Implicit Memory Processes on Motor Learning, was presented at Michigan Tech’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium this past week. With the assistance of Dr. Kevin Trewartha, Turner investigated whether scores on an implicit memory test are correlated with the slow process and whether age-related declines in implicit memory are related to deficits in motor learning.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


Psychology Student Abigail Kuehne in Undergrad Research Symposium

IMG_20170317_135654105Abigail Kuehne’s research, Trust & Cognitive Abilities: Human Factors’ Impact on Cybersecurity Practices, was presented at Michigan Tech’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium this past week.

With the assistance of Dr. Adam Feltz, Kuehne attempts to help understand the human factors that increase vulnerability to threats in their privacy and security through internet crime and identity theft. In particular, trust and cognitive abilities appear to be two major predictors of being susceptible to phishing attacks. By determining the connection that allows/prevents the end user to susceptibility of phishing, we can implement interventions to help people protect themselves.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


Dr. Jeon and Graduate Students Attend AutomotiveUI Conference

Philart and StudentsThis past week, Dr. Myoung “Philart” Jeon and seven of his students from CLS and CS attended the International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Jeon and his team received a tremendously positive response to the tutorial they hosted titled “In-Vehicle Auditory Interactions: Design and Application of Auditory Displays, Speech, Sonification, & Music”.

 


Congratulations, Assistant Professor Jeon and Graduate Students!

Myounghoon “Philart” Jeon (CLS/CS) and his graduate students Jason Sterkenburg (CLS), Steven Landry (CLS) and Ridwan Khan (CS) presented five papers at the International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD) which was held at Australian National University in Canberra, Australia July 3 through July 7.

The graduate students earned the Best Student Paper Award at the conference. Sterkenburg and Khan’s research proposals were selected for the doctoral colloquium at the conference and their travel was partly supported by NSF.

The papers presented were “Tempo-fit heart rate app: Using heart rate sonification as exercise performance feedback”, “Musical robots for children with ASD using a client-server architecture”, “Listen to your drive: Sonification architecture and strategies for driver state performance”, “LifeMusic: Reflection of life memories by data sonification” and “Towards an in-vehicle sonically-enhanced gesture control interface: A pilot study.”

From Tech Today