Computational Intelligence Aids in Explosive Hazard Detection

Havens, TimTo detect buried explosive hazards in places like Afghanistan and to save the lives 
of civilians and US soldiers, Michigan Tech researcher Tim Havens realizes it requires
 a team: a team of sensors.

A new $983,000 research project, “Heterogeneous Multisensor Buried Target Detection Using Spatiotemporal Feature Learning,” will look at how forward-looking ground- penetrating radar, LiDAR, and video sensors can be combined synergistically to see into the ground, capture high-quality images, and then automatically notify the operator of threats. With funding from the US Army Research Laboratory’s Army Research Office (ARO), Havens and Tim Schulz, professor of electrical and computer engineering, will work with three Michigan Tech PhD students to create a high probability-of-detection/low false-alarm rate solution.

“It’s a very difficult problem
 to solve because most of the radar energy bounces right off the surface of the earth.” says Havens, the William and Gloria Jackson Assistant Professor of Computer Systems
 and ICC Center for Data Sciences Director. “ It’s hard enough finding the targets, but coupled with that is the amount of data that these sensors produce is massive. It is the perfect project to combine Tim’s (Schulz) statistical signal processing background and my machine learning in big data expertise. This technology has the potential to not only save lives, but also to advance the basic science of how to combine large amounts of sensor data and information together to get a whole that is better than the sum of its parts,” Havens explains.

This new project builds upon a previous sensor-related work Havens and collaborators completed between 2013-2015 and a current project on which Havens and Joe Burns, a Senior Research Scientist at Michigan Tech Research Institute, collaborate. These projects, also funded by the US Army, study signal processing and computer-aided detection and classification using both vehicle-mounted forward-looking and handheld downward-looking ground-penetrating radars. In total, Havens and his collaborators have secured over $2.5 million in funding to develop solutions for this problem.

Figure 1. High-level overview of multi-sensor feature learning and fusion for forward-looking explosive hazard detection. iECO: Improved evolution-constructed (features). DBN: Deep belief network. CNN: Convolutional neural network. GAMKLp: ℓp norm-based genetic algorithm for multiple kernel learning (feature-level fusion method). DeFIMKL: Decision level fuzzy integral multiple kernel learning.

 

The Army currently fields ground-penetrating radars in its fleet. The problem is they cannot detect hazards until they’re right above them, putting a multi-million dollar radar—and Soldiers—directly in the path of danger.

“The big ideas here are to process big data to obtain better images, see into the ground in a high-fidelity manner, and to develop algorithms that automatically find buried threats—even notifying operators of w
hat those threats might be—all while keeping the Soldiers and equipment as far away as possible,” Havens adds.

Havens has partnered with the Army since he was a PhD student in 2008.

 


White Carbon Materials for Advanced Heat Management

Yoke Khin YapDr. Yoke Khin Yap, professor in the Michigan Tech Department of Physics at Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech), has invented a novel class of boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials for advanced heat management. BN phases are structurally similar to those of carbon solids. We have hexagonal phase-BN (h-BN), cubic phase-BN (c-BN), BN nanotubes (BNNTs), BN nanosheets (BNNSs, mono- and few- layered h-BN sheets). These BN structures are analogous to graphite, diamonds, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and graphene, respectively [1]. Therefore, BN materials can be referred as “white carbon” as they are white in appearance due to their large band gap (~6eV).

Despite the structural similarity, the properties of BN materials are different from those of carbon solids. For example, graphite is electrically conducting while h- BN is insulating due to their large band gap. A common property among the BN and carbon materials is their high heat conductivity that hold potential applications for advanced heat management. BN nanostructures are predicted to have a thermal conductivity, as high as 2000 W/m-K, about 10-times higher than that of metals [2]. Therefore, BN materials can be in contact with active electrical components to dissipate heat without the risk of an electrical short circuit.

Dr. Yap is a leading expert in BN nanomaterials, specializing in the technology of direct synthesis of BNNTs and wavy BNNSs on substrates. BNNTs developed by Dr. Yap are of high purity and high quality, two desirable attributes for applications in electronic devices. The wavy BNNSs are unique in that they have full surface contact with the substrates. They also have wavy edges that stick out from the substrate surface to enhance the contact area with the surrounding cool air/environment. Michigan Tech demonstrates that the coatings of BNNTs and wavy BNNSs can both enhance the heat dissipation rate of hot Silicon chips by as much as 250% in static ambient air.

Figure 1 shows the appearance of BNNTs (top row) and the wavy BNNSs (bottom row) under a scanning electron microscope. As shown, BNNTs are long in length (~40 microns), offering a large contact surface area with air, an important feature to accelerate heat dissipation. However their small diameter (20-50nm), results in a very small contact area with the hot substrate surface.

YKYap boron nitride nanomaterials

In contrast, the wavy BNNSs offer a much larger surface area to contact with the hot substrate surface. Their wavy edges also provide an enhanced contact area with the surrounding cool air but smaller than that offered by BNNTs. The Yap research group have combined the benefits of both materials by growing BNNTs on top of the wavy BNNSs. Results indicate that such uniquely combined BNNT/BNNS structures in the presences of gas flows promote cooling better than BNNTs and BNNSs alone.

Finally, the Michigan Tech team has also demonstrated that these BNNSs and BNNTs can be transferred to desired surfaces. They found that BNNTs and BNNSs grown on Si substrates can be peeled and transferred on to fresh Si substrates. This suggests that these novel BN nanomaterials can be transferred on to hot surfaces of electrical and electronic devices to promote cooling. Michigan Tech has filed a utility patent application and is seeking industry partners to help commercialize the technology. Please contact Michael Morley (mcmorley@mtu.edu) for further information.

 

References

[1]. Y. K. Yap, “B-C-N Nanotubes, Nanosheets, Nanoribbons, and Related

Nanostructures,” http://www.azonano.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=2847

[2]. T. Ouyang, Y. P. Chen, Y. Xie, K. K. Yang, Z. G. Bao, J. X. Zhong, “Thermal

Transport in Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanoribbons,” Nanotechnology 21, 245701

(2010).


Aerial Unpaved Road Assessment (AURA) System Attracting International Interest

A team of Michigan Tech researchers led by Colin Brooks, has been evaluating the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) for unpaved road analysis and characterization.   A research grant from both the both the U.S. and Michigan Department of Transportation has helped transform the research team’s efforts into a commercial product that has recently gained both national and international interest.

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Colin Brooks and his team at the Michigan Tech Research Institute, outfitted a UAV with a high-resolution, 36-megapixel digital camera to gather data by taking pictures while flying over unpaved roads.  Using 3D processing software, proprietary distress detection analysis algorithms, and GIS tags, the data is sent to an asset management system used in geospatial decision support tools.  The tools help locate, characterize, and prioritize problems such as wash-boarding, ruts,  potholes and erosion.  Additionally, the software provides an up-to-date inventory of unpaved roads, something that many of the agencies managing these roads do not currently have.

Several U.S. based and one Brazilian transportation agency have partnered with Michigan Tech to make improvements to the distress detection software. There are over 1.4 million miles of unpaved roads in the United States, accounting for over 1/3 of the U.S. total.   In Brazil, the ratio is just the opposite, with well over 2/3 of roadways unpaved.   Road maintenance assessments in Brazil and several places in the U.S. have begun using the tools to help manage the problems. 

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Unpaved roads provide a vital part of a nation’s transportation system with road management under the responsibility of local governments and transportation agencies, which are in need of rapid, repeatable methods that are cost-efficient and easily deployable in a budget-limited environment.   A particular focus is on making the system rapidly deployable for cost-effectively detecting deficiencies in the unpaved road components of the transportation system, including preventing of further damage to the transportation network through timely management of unpaved road assets.


Industry Invests in Women’s STEM Summer Programs

Across the United States there is a serious shortage of women enrolled in engineering and degree programs and ultimately entering the work place.  According to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), only 18-20 percent of engineering students in the nation’s universities are women.  To further compound the problem, only 14 percent then go on to careers in engineering.

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Why are so few women going into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields?  According to ASME several reasons have been suggested including lack of female engineering role models, misconceptions of what it is like to be an engineer, and having fewer technical problem-solving opportunities through K-12 compared to men. It’s also suggested that there is lack of encouragement from parents, teachers, and counselors.  “The real challenges for reaching out to young women is to get over the stereotype that engineering isn’t something girls do and then to help them build their confidence,” Betty Shanahan, executive director of the Society of Women Engineers, told the Washington Post.

The good news is that over the past decade, universities, K-12 schools, and industry have been working together to encourage more female students to explore science and engineering.  Michigan Tech has a long and successful history of providing unique hands-on programing for young women that addresses the critical need for talent in STEM fields here in Michigan and across the nation. Our Summer Youth Programs (SYP) (http://www.syp.mtu.edu/) provide an on-campus experience for pre-college students designed to ignite their passions in STEM.

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To encourage young women to pursue engineering education and careers, Michigan Tech’s industry partners have stepped up by investing in the university’s signature engineering and STEM summer youth programs geared for young women.

Women in Engineering 2015-196

Over the past two years, Ford Motor Company has provided $40,000 for Michigan Tech’s Women in Engineering (WIE) and Women in Computer Science (WICS) summer youth programs.  The WIE program, which began in 1973, is a week-long summer camp for high-achieving young women in grades 9-11. Led by faculty, staff, and graduate students from Michigan Tech and role model speakers from industry, participants spend the week exploring future careers in engineering. They learn about multiple engineering fields, complete group projects, and more.  In addition to Ford, many companies have supported WIE scholarships over the past 40 years with notable recent significant funding from the 3M Foundation, donating $150,000 over the past 6 years, sending girls from Minnesota for an experience of a lifetime.

“Ford Motor Company is pleased to support the WIE program at Michigan Tech,” said Cindy Hodges, who is chassis supplier technical assistant site manager at Ford. “We recognize how important it is to encourage young women to study engineering. As an alumna of the WIE program myself, I know how the program really helped me determine I wanted to be an engineer. It’s great to be a part of this wonderful program.”

In addition to WIE support, funding will be used to create a Junior Women in Engineering program in 2016.  Similar to WIE, it provides an opportunity for younger women (grades 6-8) to explore fields of engineering through hands-on projects and investigations. This program will serve as preparation for the WIE program.

Related to the engineering summer programs, Ford provided funding for the 2016 Women in Computer Science (WICS) youth program. WICS brings young women to campus for an exploration in computer science (CS) fields, a program on campus which was brought back to life thanks to a donation of $45,000 over the past three years by Lansing, MI based Jackson National Life.  The primary goal is to introduce the students to the many ways that CS profoundly impacts every industry from medicine to e-commerce, engineering to insurance, and much more. By giving high school girls an opportunity to explore computing projects alongside their peers, we build their confidence in their ability to succeed in a field in which women are often underrepresented. WICS students will take their new confidence and skills with them into post-secondary programs — eventually bringing them into STEM professions.

Women in Engineering 2015-310 compressFiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) is also committed to increasing the number of women entering engineering professions, especially in the automotive industry. FCA Foundation donated $30,000 to create a week-long summer youth program in 2016, designed to encourage young women to consider careers in automotive engineering.

Women in Automotive Engineering (WIAE) serves to specifically engage high-achieving young women to experience this field in a hands-on, discovery-based learning environment amongst their own peers, and compel them to consider the immense possibilities that can be found in the automotive industry.

“Although women purchase 60 percent of all vehicles and influence nearly 85 percent of all car-buying decisions, enrollment of women in baccalaureate engineering programs remains stubbornly low at around 18 percent,” said Stephen L. Williams, head of safety compliance and product analysis for FCA North America. “By Sponsoring the FCA Women in Automotive Engineering Summer Youth Program at Michigan Tech, we hope to encourage promising young women to consider engineering as a field of study and a career in the automotive industry.”

WIAE will be modeled after the successful WIE program.  However, WIAE will focus on disciplines and projects directly related to the automotive industry in areas of mechanical, electrical, and biomedical engineering as well as human machine interface.

By hosting programs exclusively for girls, Michigan Tech is trying to change the widespread perception that STEM fields are only for males. The programs also promote diversity by welcoming students from across the U.S. and around the world.

Michigan Tech would like to challenge industry partners and individuals who are passionate about advancing women in STEM fields to fully scholarship all 240 women program participants for 2016.  To learn more about how you and your company can make a lasting impact for the next generation of women leaders, please visit http://www.superiorideas.org/projects/precollege-scholarships or contact:

Cody Kangas,
Director of the Center for Pre-College Outreach
906-487-2219
ckangas@mtu.edu

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Ford Motor Company Donates Support for Women in Engineering Scholarships

Ford Motor Company Donates Support for Women in Engineering Scholarships

Last Modified 10:42 AM on Mon Mar 2, 2015

March 2, 2015—

By Monica Lester

From the left, Women in Engineering alumnae Monica Lester and Rachel Kloc,, Tech alumna and Ford representative Cynthia Hodges, President Glenn Mroz, WIE alumnae  Kara Barakowski and Maggie Stangis.

From the left, Women in Engineering alumnae Monica Lester and Rachel Kloc, Tech alumna and Ford representative Cynthia Hodges, President Glenn Mroz, WIE alumnae Kara Barakowski and Maggie Stangis.

Science, math and classes are normally the farthest things from a high school student’s mind during summer vacation. But every summer about 150 pre-college women trek up to Michigan Tech to participate in Women in Engineering (WIE), a scholarship program and an intensive, exciting week-long look into engineering careers. For some, it’s a life-changing experience.

This year, WIE and the young women attending will be able to do even more, thanks to a $10,000 donation from Ford Motor Company.

Tech alumna Cynthia Hodges, representing Ford Motor Company, presented Michigan Tech with the company’s check. Hodges earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in mechanical engineering at Michigan Tech and participated in WIE herself in 1980. She is also on a committee at Ford Motor Company called Girls in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), which encourages women into STEM fields, especially engineering. So when an opportunity came to support another program at Michigan Tech, Hodges knew which one she wanted.

“Ford Motor Company is pleased to support the WIE program at Michigan Tech,” said Hodges, who is chassis supplier technical assistance site manager at Ford. “We recognize how important it is to encourage young women to study engineering. As an alumna of the WIE program myself, I know how the program really helped me determine I wanted to be an engineer. It’s great to be a part of this wonderful program.”

Hodges presented Ford’s check in the John Edgar McAllister Welcome Center. Many people came to celebrate this donation. Brent Burns, director of industry relations at Michigan Tech, introduced the speakers. Cody Kangas, director of the Center for Pre-College Outreach, said, “Every summer we look forward to WIE.”

Then four WIE alumnae – Rachel Kloc, Monica Lester, Maggie Stangis and Kara Bakowski – stepped up to speak on the experience they had at the program and how it changed their lives.

President Glenn Mroz talked about the employment rate and how the number of people earning degrees is ever-changing process but those with degrees are needed. “These kinds of things do make a difference,” he said.

Finally, Hodges spoke, emphasizing the importance of WIE. “When people ask me what has changed my life, WIE did,” she said.

Kangas said, “Ultimately, the short-term effect of this donation is that 10 more women will be getting scholarships for this summer, but long term, these women have a bigger potential to become engineers and to come to Michigan Tech.”

WIE also has a Superior Ideas page, where Ford Motor Company’s contribution is shown along with others. Superior Ideas is a crowdfunding website at Michigan Tech that helps bring university research and public service projects to life. To contribute to WIE, go to http://www.superiorideas.org/projects/women-in-engineering.

 

Michigan Technological University (www.mtu.edu) is a leading public research university developing new technologies and preparing students to create the future for a prosperous and sustainable world. Michigan Tech offers more than 130 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering; forest resources; computing; technology; business; economics; natural, physical and environmental sciences; arts; humanities; and social sciences.

Original URL: http://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2015/march/ford-motor-company-donates-support-for-women-engineering-scholarships.html


Tech Students Explore Career Options at Medical Career Week

Tech Students Explore Career Options at Medical Careers Week

Michigan Tech students will get to explore a wide variety of careers in the medical and health fields during a four-day event called Medical Careers Week. Medical professionals from diverse fields will be on campus to discuss their professions and the educational pathways to success in those fields and to answer students’ questions.

Medical Career Week topics will be

  • Monday, Jan. 26—Medical Informatics
  • Tuesday, Jan. 27—Allied Health and Medical Laboratory Sciences
  • Wednesday, Jan. 28—Medical Careers
  • Thursday, Jan. 29—Medical Devices

Each day features a Lunch and Learn presentation from noon to 1 p.m., followed by small group discussions with visiting professionals from 6 to 8 p.m. These informal events will take place in the Memorial Union Ballroom. They are open to all students, and no registration is required.

Departments in the College of Sciences and Arts, the College of Engineering and the School of Technology pitched in to help organize the event. Guy Hembroff, director of the medical informatics graduate program in the School of Technology, helped organize Medical Informatics Day. High school students from area schools who are involved in robotics have been invited to participate.

Jason Carter, chair and professor of kinesiology and integrative physiology, and Karyn Fay, director of the medical laboratory science program in the Department of Biological Sciences, helped organize Allied Health/Medical Laboratory Sciences Day.

Stacy Cotey, director of pre-health programs, helped plan Medical Careers Day. Students from the health careers programs at local high schools have been invited to participate.

Sean Kirkpatrick, chair of biomedical engineering, helped put together Medical Device Day. A variety of medical device companies will be at Michigan Tech to discuss the future of the medical device industry.

Many of the speakers are Michigan Tech alumni, including William Karpus ’84 (BioSci), Brad Tomassucci ’84 (MedTech), Erin Thompson ’02 (ClinLabSci), Robert Richards ’77 (MedTech), Tracey Bershing, ’92 (Pre-PharmEd), Michelle Seguin ’07(BioSci), along with current medical students Eric Sturos and Stephanie Rutterbesch.

“Events like Medical Careers Week give students from all fields of study the opportunity to learn more about careers available in the medical field, said Shelley Farrey, coordinator of career development for Michigan Tech Career Services. “Not every student knows what avenue he or she wants to pursue in life when they enter college. Medical Careers Week gives them a chance to learn about the many opportunities available and the paths to get there.”


Michigan Tech Partnering with Local Businesses – GreenForces

Michigan Tech would like to announce its partnership with GreenForces – a consortium of aerospace, technology, and defense companies located in the Upper Peninsula.  The GreenForces consortium provides niche technology capability for developing product solutions in heavy vehicle, off-highway, aircraft, rotorcraft, and marine applications.  The consortium focuses on developing engineering and production solutions that are sustainable and environmentally conscious.  This includes material optimization for weight reduction and increased lifetime as well as performance optimization for mechanical systems, engines, electronics, and power utilization.  Michigan Tech provides material, metallurgy, electrical, and mechanical engineering expertise to compliment the capability and capacity of the other members of the consortium.

Greenforces graphic for blog

Each of the partnering businesses has the versatility and quick response that only small businesses can bring while leveraging the research and development capability of Michigan Tech.  With the combined resources of the companies, the consortium can provide support to any part of the product development process.

GS Engineering – Electrical, mechanical, and material engineering for vehicle and aircraft systems.  They provide innovative solutions for weight/size reduction, FEA and failure analysis, structural optimization, electronic equipment design, and vehicle testing.

Great Lakes Sound and Vibration (GLSV) – Noise, vibration, and harshness analysis, design, and testing services.  GLSV has extensive experience with exhaust systems, suspensions, and isolation systems and has a suite of capabilities for benchmarking, standard tests, and root cause analysis.

Creative Composites – Composite material development as well as component design and fabrication.  With design and development in armor and ballistic protection, Creative Composites brings effective and practical composite solutions.

IR Telemetrics – Advanced testing solutions for rotating equipment and hard to acquire data.  IR Telemetrics provides custom testing solutions for wireless acquisition of strain, pressure, torque, temperature, and fluid flow in harsh environments like those inside engine hot sections.

L’Anse Manufacturing – Precision machining and low volume high mix manufacturing for aluminum, steel, magnesium, titanium, plastics, and other materials.  L’Anse Manufacturing provides the high reliability and quality machining that is needed for aerospace, medical, and military applications.

Calumet Electronics – High Reliability bare printed circuit card fabrication since the dawn of the industry.  Calumet Electronics provides secure, safe, and sustainable PCBs for aerospace, military, and power transmission applications.

For more information on GreenForces, visit their website at www.greenforcesllc.com.  If you have interest in joining GreenForces or working with the members of the organization, please contact Executive Director Rob Cooke at 906-231-7769 or rob.cooke@greenforcesllc.com.


MTRAC Program Accelerates Commercialization Potential

Through a grant from the 21st Century Jobs Trust Fund, received through the Michigan Strategic Fund from the State of Michigan, Michigan Tech is moving advanced applied materials research closer to benefiting people and our planet.  The Michigan Translational Research and Commercialization (MTRAC) program is supporting the acceleration of commercially viable advanced applied material technologies developed by university researchers.

Two other Michigan universities were also awarded MTRAC grants in 2013.  The University of Michigan has two MTRAC programs focusing on life sciences and transportation while Michigan State University’s grant supports advancing ag-bio technologies.

Guided by an oversight committee of entrepreneurs, investors, and leading faculty researchers, four Michigan Tech teams were selected in June 2014 from among sixteen proposal submissions.   John Diebel, MTRAC Program Director at Michigan Tech explains the rigorous review process, “In order for a faculty or team of researchers to submit a proposal, there has to be an invention disclosure on file with the university to determine that there is a high potential for commercialization.  The application process uses a multi-phase submission including a Letter of Intent, an invitation to submit a proposal and then a full proposal submission, which may require modifications to meet the oversight committee’s recommendation to move forward. The final step in the selection process concludes after an inventor presentation to the Oversight Committee.”  The program provides fifty percent of the project funding and the university and the Principal Investigator must provide the matching funds.

John Diebel, MTRAC Program Director, Michigan Technological University

 

The four projects currently being conducted at Michigan Tech include mineral removal from torrefied agricultural wastes as a sustainable replacement for pulverized coal in utility boilers, led by Ezra Bar-Ziv (ME-EM); commercialization and purification of oligonucleotides and peptides for research and therapeutic markets, led by Shiyue Fang (Chem); commercialization of a nanosensor platform, led by Tom Daunais and Paul Bergstrom (ECE); and, commercialization of a scalable synthesis process for 3-dimensional graphene materials by Yun Hang Hu (MSE).

How will these projects impact people and the planet?  Bar-Ziv’s project could yield a sustainable and renewable alternative fuel to help the utility industry meet renewable resource and greenhouse gas emission targets.  Fang’s project would provide a method for efficiently producing pharmaceutically-pure drugs for treatment of many diseases including cancer other life threatening illnesses.  Daunais’ project would allow for rapid testing of foodborne pathogens-a process that currently takes days.  This would allow food to pass criteria to begin shipping to markets and stores more quickly reducing waste and spoilage.  And Hu’s project could lead to innovations in regenerative braking, solar power, grid management systems, defense weaponry, and provide the ability to recover kinetic energy in a host of other industrial applications.

The next Michigan Tech MTRAC program cycle will be announced in December 2014 with a call for Letter of Intent submissions due in mid-January.  For more information, please contact John Diebel at 906-487-1082 or by email jfdiebel@mtu.edu.


American Transmission Co. Sponsored Senior Design Receives Award

Senior Design projects provide an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to real life engineering challenges. It also provides companies with a taste of what Michigan Tech students have to offer in developing creative solutions that utilize skills and knowledge acquired throughout their degree pursuit.  Senior design is a win-win for students and industry partners alike.

This year’s American Transmission Company (ATC) Senior Design team was nothing short of fantastic. While they gained experience relevant to their Electrical Engineering course work, they also contributed towards solutions and innovations in the area of motor drives for ATC.  ATC acknowledged the student project in their June newsletter issue of PluggedIn.

Guided by their faculty advisor, Trever Hassell, along with a team of professional engineers from ATC, with their mentorship and support the students not only met all project goals and expectations set by ATC but also earned the Electrical and Computer Engineering department’s “External Advisory Committee Industry Innovation Award”. This award is given annually to the Senior Design team whose project and deliverable are considered most impactful to industry expectations while benefiting the sponsor.

http://blogs.mtu.edu/ece/category/senior-design/

For more information about the Senior Design program please contact Rick Berkey,  rjberkey@mtu.edu, (906)-487-4309.


Chrysler Helps Formula SAE Team Make it to Competition

On the road to competition in Detroit, MI, the Michigan Tech Formula SAE team ran into transmission issues just south of the Mackinac Bridge. Chrysler of Gaylord, MI came to the rescue in good time to help them make it to competition and back safely.

The team is very appreciative of all the assistance they received from Chrysler. “Chrysler has always been a tremendous asset to the Formula SAE team and Michigan Tech” said the teams Chief Engineer, Chais Eliason.  “We are keenly aware that we could not have been successful down at competition this year without the support of Chrysler”. The team earned 61st place overall out of 126 teams.