Archives—November 2014

CS Tutorial Announcement: December 3, 4, 5

Title: A Tutorial on Theorem Proving in the Prototype Verification System (PVS)

Abstract: This tutorial will be offered for faculty members and graduate students whose research involves any sort of logical reasoning that can be expressed in predicate logic. The Prototype Verification System (PVS) is one of the premier theorem provers developed at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI). This tutorial provides a basic understanding of PBS along with the elementary techniques for formal specification and mechanical verification. PVS has been used in the verification of numerous real-world applications such as mission-critical systems, air traffic management systems, fault-tolerant distributed systems, security protocols, spacecraft autonomy and AI planning.

Organizers: Mr. Amer Tahat (CS), Dr. Ali Ebnenasir (CS), and Dr. Ossama Abdelkhalik (ME-EM).

Time: 4:00 – 5:00 p.m., Dec. 3rd, 4th and 5th
Place: Rekhi 112
Registration: Please send an email to Mr. Amer Tahat at atahat@mtu.edu. Space is limited, so register early please.

Acknowledgement: The organizers extend their gratitude to the Formal Methods group at NASA Langley for providing technical support. Prerequisites include preliminary knowledge of propositional and predicate logic.

 



CS Department Chair to Hold Seminar Nov. 24

Min Song
Min Song

Dr. Min Song, new chair of the Department of Computer Science and former program director at NSF, will hold a research seminar on Monday, November 24th from 11:00am – Noon in 101 Rekhi. The talk will first explore the critical elements that could strengthen a research proposal and then illustrate a list of typical mistakes that PIs make. At the end of the presentation, samples of programs in the area of computer information science and engineering will be discussed.





Computer Science Groups to Participate in Campus World Usability Day Events

World Usability Day (WUD) is an annual event highlighting the importance of humans as participants in technology. In a world where basic infrastructures (including health, education and finance) depend on rapidly changing technologies, World Usability Day organizers call for ways to serve people first.

We are taking the spirit of WUD to the Upper Peninsula with WUD-UP. If you are interested in research, education or service that is associated with human factors, human-centered design, usability, ergonomics or other fields related to humans and technology, you are invited to attend.

Here’s what’s on tap for WUD-UP on Thursday, Nov. 13:

9:30-11a.m.: Tour of the Mind Music Machine Lab

  • Meese Building: Indoor wayfinding for the blind; Brain-computer interfaces; Interactive robots for children with autism; Advanced auditory menus
  • MEEM 128: Driving research
  • EERC 510: Immersive interactive sonification

11 a.m.-2 p.m.: Open House, Humane Interface Design Enterprise (HIDE)

Rekhi 116: Join HIDE members for an open house, which will feature a driving simulator and a new technology that will soon be competing for our attention—the Google Glass.

2-3 p.m.: Lab Tours, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology (begins at the SDC ticket counter)

  • Exercise Physiology Lab: Come try the cycling workstation (integrated exercise bike and computer desk), designed to facilitate increased physical activity and recently featured in the Wall Street Journal.
  • Neuromechanics Lab: Get a free report on your segmental body composition, muscle strength and power. You can compare your strength and power with Michigan Tech student-athletes, and you will find our players are very powerful!
  • Integrative Physiology Lab: Research in this lab primarily focuses on neural control of circulation in humans. These studies aim to better understand the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease and orthostatic hypotension, with the goal of uncovering methods for reducing their incidence.

7-8:30 p.m.: “Cyber-Seniors” Screening and Discussion

East Reading Room, Van Pelt and Opie Library: A humorous and heartwarming feature documentary, “Cyber-Seniors” adds to the important international conversation about the growing generation gap. Focusing on a group of senior citizens who take their first steps into cyberspace under the tutelage of teenage mentors, the film expertly renders a thought-provoking look at a spirited group of men and women who are enriched by digitally reconnecting with their families and each other. Finding their footing rather quickly, the group moves on to compete for the most YouTube views while swiftly building their online inventory of friends.

Following the screening, we will have a discussion of the Cyber-Seniors project and ideas for implementation in the Copper Country. Teachers from the Copper Country Intermediate School District and members of Michigan Tech’s Breaking Digital Barriers group will participate.

 

From Tech Today, November 11, 2014



Recent Grants

Philart Jeon: PI, National Health Institute. “NRI: Colloborative: Interactive Robotic Orchestration – Music-based emotion and social interaction therapy for children with ASD,” 2014-2017.

Philart Jeon: Co-PI, US DOT-OST, National University Rail Center Project. “NURail-Tier I,” 2014-2017

Robert Pastel & Charles Wallace: CI-Team, National Science Foundation.”Environmental CyberCitizens: Engaging Citizen Scientists in Global Environmental Change through Crowdsensing and Visualization,” 2011 and on-going

Laura Brown & Zhenlin Wang: Co-PI, National Science Foundation. “Adaptive Memory Resource Management in a Data Center – A Transfer Learning Approach,” 2014-2017

Leo Ureel: Recipient, Jackson Blended Learning Grant. “Canvas TA: Auto Program Feedback,” 2014-2015