Archives—June 2015


CS4ALL 2015: Workshop for Teaching Computer Science in K-12 Classroom

Google Computer Science for High SchoolCS4ALL Workshop

Michigan Tech, August 17-19, 2015

APPLICATION: Deadline is June 25, 2015.

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE: Upper Peninsula teachers and administrators interested in teaching computer science and programming in their school or classroom.

COST: Attendance is free.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Meals will be provided while the workshop is in session. A stipend will be provided to cover travel and other expenses. Free accommodations are available for out of town participants.

FOLLOW UP SUPPORT: One year of assistance in CS instruction and course development from a Michigan Tech Computer Science graduate student.

Visit the Michigan Tech CS4ALL workshop website and apply for participation.

If you have questions about the workshop, please contact Prof. Charles Wallace at wallace@mtu.edu.

This workshop is made possible through a Google CS4HS grant. Learn more about Google Computer Science for High School.

Google Grant Supports Computer Science Training for Teachers

Three Michigan Tech faculty members have received a Google Computer Science for High School grant to develop a UP-wide community of K-12 teachers trained to teach computer science and programming.

Faculty members who developed this initiative and received the Google grant are Professor Linda Ott (CS), Associate Professor Charles Wallace (CS) and Lecturer Leo Ureel II (CS).

Google, like other Silicon Valley tech companies, is actively promoting computational thinking as a skill that needs to be taught to pre-college students.

The kick-off event is a workshop for K-12 teachers on computer science and computational thinking, August 17-19 at Michigan Tech.

The workshop is free and includes meals, a hotel room for teachers from out of town, a stipend to help cover travel expenses and a year of support from Michigan Tech’s Computer Science Department for computer science course development and instruction.

The workshop will begin with basic computer science principles, so teachers with little or no computer science experience are eligible. Up to 40 teachers can attend.

One of the workshop’s goals is to help teachers integrate computer programming into new or existing courses.

From Tech Today, by Jennifer Donovan.