Archives—October 2016

Faculty and Students Attend Conference

Philart-and-StudentsMyounghoon “Philart” Jeon (CLS/CS) and his seven students attended the 8th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI) Oct. 24-26 at University of Michigan.

Jeon and students hosted a tutorial on “in-vehicle auditory interactions: Design and Application of Auditory Displays, Speech, Sonification and Music.” Jeon and international collaborators hosted a workshop on “Ethically Inspired User Interfaces for Decision Making in Automated Driving.”

They had two demos at the conference: “Listen to Your Drive: An In-vehicle Sonification Prototyping Tool for Driver State and Performance Data” and “Development Tool for Rapid Evaluation of Eyes-free In-Vehicle Gesture Controls.”

This travel has been supported by CLS, CS, ICC, MTTI and HMC.


Faculty/Graduate Student Hour

Each semster Computer Science graduate students are invited to meet with faculty to share their views about the department and the graduate programs, ask questions, and discuss anything else that is of interest. It is a good time to build connections between faculty and students, and create a collaborative environment.2Faculty-Graduate Student Hour meeting photo


Tommy Stuart Receives Second Place in Elevator Pitch Competition

14606260_1272887379411026_1795585242386597791_nCongratulations to Tommy Stuart for earning second place at the 2016 Bob Mark Elevator Pitch Competition on October 6.

His pitch, “Delving Deeply,” proposed to complete development of a single-player top-down action adventure style game, and eventually start a local game development studio to leverage the large population of knowledgeable computer science students in the area.

The game idea and pitch was cultivated in Husky Game Development Enterprise in which students develop video games and were required to pitch their game ideas to the Enterprise one week before the Bob Mark competition.

For winning second place out of the 25 pitches at the Bob Mark Elevator Pitch Competition, Tommy is receiving $1,000, a free ticket to Michigan Tech’s 2017 Silicon Valley Experience trip, Smartzone Virtual Client Membership, and a Smart Start Program Tuition Waiver.


Computer Science in Top 18 in Nation

homepage_clouds_lgPayScale, a compensation analysis web site, has announced the top 25 university computer science programs in the country and Michigan Tech placed 18th.

In its 2016-2017 College Salary Report, Payscale ranked 171 colleges and universities with computer science programs based on the median early-career and mid-career pay of the schools’ computer science alumni. Tech’s early-career computer science salaries are listed at $63,900. Mid-career median pay is $126,000.

“This is great news. It is the best indicator of the quality of our programs,” said Min Song, chair of Computer Science.

Stanford University ranked number one in the nation, with its computer science graduates reporting a median early-career salary of $99,500 and mid-career salary of $168,000. Read the full report.

By Jenn Donovan



Associate Professor Timothy Havens received a research award

Timothy HavensAssociate Professor Timothy Havens received a DoD Army Research Office research award with a budget of $99,779 during the first year.

This is also a 3-year project with a total budget of $1,066,799. The project is titled “Multisensor Analysis and Algorithm Development for Detection and Classification of Buried and Obscured Targets.”

Tim and his students will develop new algorithms to detect and classify buried objects, one of the important research areas for ARO.


Professor Zhenlin Wang received external funding

Zhenlin WangProfessor Zhenlin Wang received an NSF research award with a total budget of $375,000.

This is a 3-year project with a title of “CSR:Small: Effective Sampling-Based Miss Ratio Curves: Theory and Practice”. In this project, Zhenlin and his students will use miss ratio curves (MRCs), which relate cache miss ratio to cache size, to model working set and cache locality.

The project develops a new cache locality theory to construct MRCs effectively and then applies it to several caching or memory management systems.