All posts by cisimpki




Computer Science Undergrads Publish Book

A World of Java Programing SmCopper Country Coders (CCCoders) is an organization that introduces local students in middle and high school to the world of computer science and programming. Michigan Tech undergraduate and graduate computer science students volunteer as instructors and mentors under the guidance of Computer Science faculty members Leo Ureel and Charles Wallace.

Last year, volunteers Marissa Walther and Shaun Flynn focused on teaching students how to develop in Java and create games using JavaFX. What began as a class assignment for CS 4099 Directed Study in Computer Science Education developed into a book based off of the CCCoders curriculum. The book, “A World of Java Programming” has since been published and is now available on Amazon.

About the authors:  Marissa is a third year Computer Science major who participates in the Husky Game Development Enterprise. She is a member of CCCoders, the Huskies Pep Band and the Superior Wind Symphony. Marissa is also a Computer Science Learning Center Coach and the office assistant for the Engineering Fundamentals Department.  Shaun is a third year Computer Engineering major. He is a project manager for Blue Marble Security Enterprise and vice president of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN). On the weekends, Shaun teaches a middle school programing class through CCCoders with Marissa. He also works as a lab assistant for CS 1121 Introduction to Programming.



Alexander Larkin places 101 out of 3,449 in the National Cyber League (NCL)

My name is Alexander Larkin and I am currently finishing up my first semester, at Michigan Tech, as a Computer Science major.  I transferred from Waukesha County Technical College, WI where I spent a few years studying networking, programming, and cybersecurity.  During my first semester, at Michigan Tech, I competed in the NCL(National Cyber League) and placed 101st out of 3,449 competitors.  NCL is a cybersecurity competition that assesses an individual’s skill in cryptography, network traffic analysis, task automation, exploitation of vulnerable systems, and much more.  Participating in NCL is an incredible way to learn about cybersecurity concepts and is an absolutely great experience.  I began competing in NCL when I was sixteen years old.  I have continued to compete in most NCL games since that time and I always look forward to the next competition.  The competition gives a competitor a set of tasks to complete, via a clean and intuitive web interface.  For every task completed, points are given based on the difficulty of the task.  Sometimes the competition demands an individual learn about some strange technologies such as Voice-Over-IP.  During this last competition, I found myself researching how Voice-Over-IP works, so I could track phone calls, stored in a packet capture.  Every time I compete in NCL I find myself learning about cool technologies.  Over the years, I have learned how to become a master at the art of “Google-Fu”.  Over the years of competing, I have learned just how important it is to do research on unknown topics and technologies.  NCL also taught me that it is OK to not know something and to not admit defeat, but to do some research, learn the topic, and apply what I learn on the fly.  Learning how to “learn on the fly” has helped me immensely in all aspects of my life and is enormously valuable in Computer Science.  I would consider it to be a pseudo-required skill to possess in the dynamic world of computing.  I am happy to be competing in National Cyber League here at Michigan Tech and I am looking forward to competing in the Spring of 2018.  Additional information about National Cyber League can be found at www.nationalcyberleague.org.  I would like to personally thank Professor Min Song and Professor Bo Chen for providing faculty leadership during this last competition and I look forward to working with them again in the Spring.

Congratulations Alexander!



MTU Hosts International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC)

Saturday Oct. 28th Michigan Tech hosted a site of the North Central North American (NCNA) region of the International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC).  Locally, 11 teams competed, 7 from Michigan Tech and 4 from NMU.  Across the region there were 207 teams competing.  The top team in the region from South Dakota School of Mines solved 8 of the 10 problems in the five hour competition.  The following were the top three teams from Michigan Tech all solving 4 problems (full standings are available at: https://ncna17.kattis.com/standings) :
  • MTU White, region rank 12
    Anthony Marcich, 4th year Math major
    Nick Olinger, 3rd year Math major
    Jay Honnold, 4th year CS major
  • MTU Red, region rank 13
    Justin Evankovich, 4th year EE major
    Nicolas Muggio, 4th year Software Engineering major
    Antony Duda, 4th year CE major
  • MTU Purple, region rank 16
    Michael Lay, 3rd year Software Engineering major
    Marcus Stojcevich, 3rd year CS major
    Parker Russcher, 3rd year CS major

Two other teams, MTU Orange – Evan de Jesus, Paul Wrubel, Dylan Gaines and MTU – Black – Isaac Smith, Austin Walhof, Ryan Philipps, finished in the top 50 teams of the region.

Congratulations to all participants in this year’s event.
~Laura Brown, Associate Professor, Computer Science

Associate Professor, Jeon, Receives Korea Automobile Testing and Research Institute Grant

MyounghoonJeon20140131_0001Philart’s grant is a 4-year award with a total budget of $350,000 from Korea Automobile Testing & Research Institute. Two graduate students will be supported by this grant each year. The project is titled “Development of the safety assessment technique for take‐over in automated vehicles.”

The goal of the project is to design and evaluate intelligent auditory interactions for improving safety and user experience in the automated vehicles. Research tasks include developing a driving simulator for automated driving model, modelling driver states in automated vehicles, design and evaluating discrete auditory alerts for safety purpose, and the development of real-time sonification systems for overall user experience. Congratulations Philart!

 


CS Assistant Professor, Jianhui Yue, Receives an NSF Award

Jianhui YueJianhui Yue’s grant is a 3-year NSF award with a total budget of $176,876. One PhD student will be supported for two years.  The project is titled “Improving Reliability of In-Memory Storage”. The project addresses two challenges of in-memory storage: 1) Memory cells have limited write endurance (i.e., the total number of program/erase cycles per cell), and 2) Nonvolatile memory has to remain in a consistent state in the event of a system crash or power loss.
This project will take a holistic approach, spanning from low-level architecture design to high-level OS management, to optimize the reliability, performance, and manageability of in-memory storage.
Congratulations!