All posts by cisimpki

Tech Seeking Teachers Who Want to Bring Computer Science into their Classrooms

CS4All group photoMichigan Technological University is inviting K-12 teachers and administrators to a workshop in August, to help them find ways to bring computer science and programming into their classrooms. The workshop, supported through a Google CS4HS (Computer Science for High Schools) grant, exposes teachers to exciting new ways to bring computer science into schools.

This is the third year Google has supported a computer science workshop at Michigan Tech for teachers.

“As computer technology becomes an ever more powerful and pervasive factor in our world, students need instruction in the creative problem-solving skills that are the basis of computer science,” explains Linda Ott, professor of computer science at Michigan Tech and director of the workshop. “Software design and programming skills, along with an understanding of the principles of computer systems and applications, are tremendously valuable in a wide range of future careers, and the problem-solving process of computational thinking can be used to enrich a wide range of K-12 courses. New tools and teaching materials make it possible to bring the creative spirit of computing into K-12 classrooms.”

“From a teacher’s perspective, however, bringing computer science into the classroom can seem intimidating,” Ott goes on to say. “We want to help teachers develop confidence in their own computer science literacy and help them craft a computing curriculum that meets their teaching missions.”

The workshop will cover a basic understanding of computer science principles, help teachers integrate programming into new and existing courses, disseminate K-12 computer programing course materials developed at Michigan Tech and provide tools for increasing interest in computing among young women.

Participants will receive lunches, a stipend to help with travel and other expenses and a year of assistance in course development from a Michigan Tech computer science graduate student. Out-of-town teachers will receive free accommodation at the Magnuson Franklin Square Inn.

Visit the article in Tech Today http://www.mtu.edu/ttoday/ by J. Donovan for a link on how to apply.


Keith Vertanen Receives Exceptional Instructor Evaluation Score

image124044-persCongratulations to Keith Vertanen for having been identified as one of only 71 instructors who received an exceptional “Average of 7 Dimensions” student evaluation score during Spring semester 2017. Keith’s score is 4.53 with an enrollment of 105. Keith received the same recognition in Spring 2016 with a score of 4.49 with an enrollment of 85.

Congratulations Keith!  Please keep up the good work!


MIT Lincoln Laboratory contract for Tim Havens

Timothy Havens
Timothy Havens

Associate Professor Tim Havens received a $15,000 contract from MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Tim and his team will investigate signal processing for active phased array systems with simultaneous transmit and receive capability. While this capability offers increased performance in communications, radar, and electronic warfare applications, the challenging aspect is that a high-level of isolation must be achieved between the transmit and receive antennas in order to mitigate self-interference in the array. This is a half-year project. Timothy Schulz at ECE is the co-PI of the project. Excellent work Tim!


Microdevice for Rapid Blood Typing without Reagents and Hematocrit Determination – STTR: Phase II

Laura BrownMichigan Tech Associate Professor Laura Brown (co-PI) and Robert Minerick (PI) of Microdevice Engineering, Inc. were granted a new award funded by the National Science Foundation regarding the broader impact/commercial potential of development of a portable, low cost blood typing and anemia screening device for use in blood donation centers, hospitals, humanitarian efforts and the military.

This device provides the ability to pre-screen donors by blood type and selectively direct the donation process (i.e. plasma, red cells) to reduce blood product waste and better match supply with hospital demand. This portable technology could also be translated to remote geographical locations for disaster relief applications.

The proposed project will advance knowledge across multiple fields including: microfluidics and the use of electric fields to characterize cells to identify the molecular expression on blood cells responsible for ABO-Rh blood type and rapidly measure cell concentration. This project includes the development of software for real time tracking of cell population motion and adapts advanced pattern recognition tools like machine learning and statistical analysis for identification of features and prediction of blood types.

 


Scott Kuhl Receives the C2E2 Award

Scott Kuhl
Scott Kuhl won an award.

Scott Kuhl received the C2E2 award in the amount of $1,600. The award will help Scott purchase affordable head-mounted displays (HMDs) to support research, education, and outreach. The Michigan Tech Century II Endowed Equipment Fund (C2E2) is a program aimed at providing equipment money to improve the lives of faculty, students, and staff campus-wide. The program is supported by the Michigan Tech Fund, through donations by individuals and organizations in the Fund.

Congratulations Scott!


Faculty/Graduate Student Hour

Each semster Computer Science graduate students are invited to meet with faculty to share their views about the department and the graduate programs, ask questions, and discuss anything else that is of interest. It is a good time to build connections between faculty and students, and create a collaborative environment.2Faculty-Graduate Student Hour meeting photo



Associate Professor Timothy Havens received a research award

Timothy HavensAssociate Professor Timothy Havens received a DoD Army Research Office research award with a budget of $99,779 during the first year.

This is also a 3-year project with a total budget of $1,066,799. The project is titled “Multisensor Analysis and Algorithm Development for Detection and Classification of Buried and Obscured Targets.”

Tim and his students will develop new algorithms to detect and classify buried objects, one of the important research areas for ARO.


Professor Zhenlin Wang received external funding

Zhenlin WangProfessor Zhenlin Wang received an NSF research award with a total budget of $375,000.

This is a 3-year project with a title of “CSR:Small: Effective Sampling-Based Miss Ratio Curves: Theory and Practice”. In this project, Zhenlin and his students will use miss ratio curves (MRCs), which relate cache miss ratio to cache size, to model working set and cache locality.

The project develops a new cache locality theory to construct MRCs effectively and then applies it to several caching or memory management systems.


Associate Professor Charles Wallace receives NSF funding for a 5-year project partnering with Arizona State, Penn State, and Rutgers

image45069-persAssociate Professor Charles Wallace received NSF funding through a 5-year project that has a total budget of $2,983,358 and involves researchers from Michigan Tech, Arizona State, Penn State, and Rutgers.

The project is titled “Climate Change Mitigation via Reducing Household Food, Energy and Water Consumption: A Quantitative Analysis of Interventions and Impacts of Conservation.” The PI is David Watkins in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan Tech. Associate Professor Charles Wallace’s share of the budget is approximately $105,529 and includes grad student support in the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 academic years, as well as four years of undergraduate student support.

He and his students will develop a software application that allows homeowners to monitor the environmental costs of their consumption.

This collaborative project not only supports our graduate and undergraduate students, but also helps promote the department’s internal and external visibility.