Tag Archives: CTL

September

COFFEE CHAT: Testing Center Scheduling Process (Thursday, September, 15)

The Michigan Tech Testing Center has grown by leaps and bounds over the past three years, prompting changes in staffing, software, and process. The changes have tried to better serve instructors, offer more flexibility to students, and allow a broader array of sponsored exams. In this Coffee Chat on Thursday, September 15, from 3:30-4:30pm, we’ll discuss the new registration process implemented this fall and get feedback about how the Testing Center can continue to improve. Refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, September 12. Click here to register.

LUNCH AND LEARN: Academic Integrity Student Survey Results (Tuesday, September 20)

In spring 2016, the Academic Integrity Committee surveyed Michigan Tech students from all levels and majors. In the more than 1500 responses received, students rated a variety of behaviors in terms of seriousness, and indicated how often they were observed.   In this luncheon event on Tuesday, September 20 from noon to 1pm, we’ll review aggregated responses and comments.  We’ll then highlight some surprising lessons for instructors regarding current student expectations in a learning environment. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Friday, September 16. Click here to register.

LUNCH AND LEARN: How Students Learn –  Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Thursday, September 29)

 A Pretty Model is, in Itself, More Engaging and Inspiring than Copious Content Extracted from our Minds:  Teachers often overrate the importance of their content and underrate their influence.  However, students forget much of the content that they memorize.  Thus, attempts to teach students all that they will need to know is futile.  Rather, it is important that students develop an interest and love for lifelong learning.  Inspiring and motivating students is critical because unless students are inspired and motivated our efforts are pointless.  Once students are inspired and motivated, there are countless resources available to learn more about a subject.  During this luncheon session, September 29, noon to 1:00pm, we will discuss the background and use of three strategies that are documented to inspire, engage and motivate our students. This event is co-sponsored by the Jackson CTL and the Department of Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology.   Click here to register.

PEDAGOGY WORKSHOP: How Students Learn – Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Thursday, September 29)

Shock and Awe Pedagogy: “Building” Bonds and Brains: The success of shock and awe pedagogy may be attributable, in part, to a powerful emotional connection.  Basic emotions including shock, anger, fear and sadness are shared by all humans.  When we experience emotion in our lives we tend to remember the experience.  In fact, the more emotional impact an experience has, the more intensely we remember its details and the more likely it will be stored in long-term memory.  In this workshop, September 29, 2:00 to 3:15pm, participants will be assigned to small groups based on similar expertise and develop and share one memorable pedagogical experience based on a model, humor or shocking performance. This event is co-sponsored by the Jackson CTL and the Department of Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology.   Click here to register.

KINESIOLOGY AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR: How Students Learn – Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Friday, September 30)

Too Much Content, Not Enough Thinking, and Too Little Fun: Henry Ford, stated “Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is why so few people engage in it.”  This is also true in the classroom where the content driven curriculum leaves little time for thinking.  In this setting, information is transferred from the notes of one person to the notes of another person without going through the minds of either person.  That is, we spend too little time thinking about the information.  This is important because active processing of information, not just passive reception of that information, leads to learning. Specifically, we understand the information we think about because understanding is the residue of thinking.  Therefore, in this seminar, September 29, 3:00 to 4:00pm, we will discuss strategies to create a joy, an excitement, and a love for learning.  By making learning fun, our students will be impatient to run home, study, and contemplate–to really learn. No registration is required for the Friday KIP Department Seminar to be held in 101 ATDC.

 

 

 


April

COFFEE CHAT: Writing Good Letters of Recommendation (Tuesday, April 12)

Most all instructors at Michigan Tech will be asked to write many letters of recommendation for students applying for jobs, internships, further schooling, or scholarships. How do we best convey what we know about the student? What if we don’t know the student very well? And what can we say that will make those reading the letter take notice? In this coffee chat, on Tuesday, April 12, from 3:30-4:30pm, we’ll discuss this topic with members of the Career Services Corporate Advisory Board  what they value in letters of recommendation. Also we will discuss how best to ensure that our letters have the intended impact. Refreshments will be provided to those who register by Friday, April 8Click here to register.

Lunch and Learn: Active Learning Classroom Open House and Luncheon (Thursday, April 14)

Since William G. Jackson’s gift three years ago, the CTL has been exploring options for a larger bring-your-own-device active learning classroom. With help from Information Technology, the advice of a diverse group of instructors, and inspiration from many other institutions, we finally started construction in January. The classroom, located in Rekhi Hall G05, should be ready for “Beta Testing” this summer and for full use by fall.
On April 14 from noon to 1pm, come and check out the capabilities of this 60-seat space and learn how you can apply to teach your flipped, active-learning, or group-focused class in it. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Monday, April 11. Click here to register.

PHET Interactive Simulations

Submitted by Mike Meyer, Director of the William G. Jackson CTL

Another simulation site that should be on every science and engineering instructor’s list is PhET.  Founded by Carl Wieman’s Nobel prize winnings, the University of Colorado Boulder has created highly-interactive simulation environments for a wide variety of basic systems, including forces and motion, earth sciences, chemistry, biology, fluids, vibrations, electromagnetism,  AC and DC circuits, thermodynamics, and general mathematics.

PHET sims generally have very low learning curves, so students can “jump in” and experiment with them on their own.  The sims therefore make excellent pre-lab exercises or introductions to topics.   PhET’s extensive educational research has helped focus the sims on addressing common scientific misconceptions held by students, and the site offers materials that guide use of the sims should you wish to provide more structure.

If PhET isn’t already on your radar, I hope you’ll take a look.  For more information about how these sims are being used in various places around campus, mail ctl@mtu.edu  or feel free to stop by the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning in the Van Pelt and Opie Library, room 219!



November

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet faculty from other departments. 

Lunch and Learn — International Students: How Can We Help Them Succeed in the Classroom? (11/13): International students bring unique skills, perspectives, opportunities, and challenges to our classrooms and programs.  Prior to this blended seminar, you’ll watch video interviews with instructors and administrators who have experience working with international students at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Then, you’ll select those facilitators you’d like to engage during a lunchtime discussion. This luncheon is scheduled for Thursday, November 13 from noon-1 p.m. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Monday, November 10.  Click here to register.

Coffee Chat — How Learning Works (11/18): Dr. Susan Ambrose of Northeastern University recently published a book entitled How Learning Works: 7 Research-based Principles for Smart Teaching.    During this coffee chat, we’ll discuss the 7 principles and how best to apply them to create a learner-centered classroom. Prior to the coffee chat, participants are asked to watch a 52-minute webinar, featuring Dr. Ambrose and recorded as part of WEPAN’s Engineering Inclusive Teaching Project, to inform the conversation. This coffee chat event This coffee chat is scheduled for Tuesday, November 18 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Thursday, November 14.  Click here to register.


October

The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet faculty from other departments. 

Coffee Chat — Organizing STEM Education Research (10/2): A growing number of instructors on campus have expressed interest in measuring the effects of classroom reforms. The Pavlis Honors College, the Graduate School, the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences, the Engineering Fundamentals Department and others have begun working together to formalize programs and centralize resources in order to better support this kind of work. This discussion will include a summary of efforts to-date, a review of a potential campus-wide grant proposal, and opportunities for you to share your input on future directions. All with an interest in STEM Education research are encouraged to attend! This event is scheduled for Thursday, October 2, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, September 29.  Click here to register.

Coffee Chat — Information Literacy Learning Goal (10/7): Join the Information Literacy Goal Committee for a collaborative primer about integrating information literacy instruction effectively and efficiently in your course or degree program. Reminder: The Information Literacy University Student Learning Goal (USLG) will be assessed university wide this year. This timely workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, October 7 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Thursday, October 2.  Click here to register.

Lunch and Learn — Jackson Blended Learning Grant Showcase (10/16): Through a generous gift from William G. Jackson in 2013, the CTL awarded $1000, $5000 and $10,000 grants to teams of instructors for blended learning projects at Michigan Tech. This luncheon will showcase these grant projects, which include travel to blended learning conferences as well as small-to-extensive course development or expansion projects, delivered using blended and online learning techniques. Participants will be invited to explore the kinds of work funded by previous grants prior to the luncheon and then select facilitators for further conversation. The goal is to encourage participants to initiate their own blended learning projects and/or propose a grant during the second solicitation, planned for November 2014. This luncheon is scheduled for Thursday, October 16 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Monday, October 13.  Click here to register.

Workshop and Luncheon — On Thursday, Oct. 23, staff from TechSmith, makers of popular video recording/editing software, will be at Michigan Tech for one day only to showcase their tools and share their expertise. The William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning invites faculty and instructional staff to attend two TechSmith events. For instructors new to recording and editing videos or screen capture, a Video Tools Overview is scheduled for 9:30 to 11a.m., so instructors can see what can be done with TechSmith tools, ask questions and learn how to get started. Those already using Camtasia or other TechSmith tools are encouraged to register for an afternoon Advanced User Workshop to get an expert’s help on projects. To register, click on the links above or contact the CTL for assistance at 7-3000.


Goals for the First Day of Class

by Mike Meyer, Director of the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning

Michigan Tech instructors need to make the most of every minute.   The good news is that a tremendous number of free teaching resources are available to us, so that –  increasingly – we don’t have to “reinvent the wheel.”  Each week of this fall semester, I’ll showcase one of my favorite online (free!) teaching resources, in hopes that you’ll find some things that increase learning and save you time.  If you have favorite resources, I encourage you to bring them to my attention so I can share them with the instructional community as well.

This week’s resource is Merlot Elixr’s “Goals for the First Day of Class”.

This “case story” is a series of short videos showcasing essential practices for the first day of class and a plethora of ideas to really get the semester started right.   Snippets from a wide variety of disciplines are included, but the general themes (Motivation, Framing, Expectations, Assessment, Climate, and Administration) are generically useful as you plan your first day.

If you’d like to talk more about your first day, or about any aspect of your teaching, feel free to stop by the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning in the Van Pelt and Opie Library, Suite 219!


September and Early October

The Center schedules events for faculty and instructional staff to provide opportunities to learn new instructional strategies and tools and meet faculty from other departments. 

Coffee Chat — Dr. Barbara Oakley (9/11): Dr. Oakley (Antarctic adventurer, Russian translator, engineering professor, and author) will be in Houghton for a series of lectures at both Finlandia University and Michigan Tech.  This event provides instructors a unique opportunity to learn about her recent research on learning math and science that is presented in her book “A Mind for Numbers”.  Discussion will focus initially on her “10 Rules of Good and Bad Studying” and how they might apply to class design, but topics are expected to range widely! Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, September 8.  Join us for this event on Thursday, September 11 from 3:30 to 4:30pm. Click here to register.

Lunch and Learn — Student Accommodations (9/16): A growing number of Michigan Tech students are eligible to receive extra time, quiet space, or other accommodations during class activities. This trend has raised concerns among instructors. In this event, we will explore the process through which student accommodations are granted and the resources available to help instructors appropriately, consistently, and fairly accommodate students. Prior to this blended seminar, participants will watch video interviews with several faculty and administrators involved in this process and then select those most relevant for lunchtime discussion. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Thursday, September 11. Join us for this event on Tuesday, September 16 from noon to 1pm. Click here to register.

Luncheon and Gamification Workshops — Todd Wilmore (9/23): Todd Wilmore is a dynamic speaker and organizational consultant, as well as an adjunct professor at both Central Michigan and Saint Leo Universities. During his visit to Michigan Tech on Tuesday, September 23, he’ll offer both a lunchtime session on the changing role of instructors in higher education and a 75-minute workshop on using game theory in class design (gamification). The gamification workshop will be offered twice (one morning session and one afternoon session), but enrollment will be limited to 40 for each workshop session. All are encouraged to attend the luncheon event. Don’t miss this opportunity to explore innovative techniques with an expert that you can use to motivate your students! To register for any of these events, please call 487-3000 or register online using the links above. Lunch will be available for those who register by Thursday, September 18.

Coffee Chat — Organizing STEM Education Research (10/2): A growing number of instructors on campus have expressed interest in measuring the effects of classroom reforms. The Pavlis Honors College, the Graduate School, the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences, the Engineering Fundamentals Department and others have begun working together to formalize programs and centralize resources in order to better support this kind of work. This discussion will include a summary of efforts to-date, a review of a potential campus-wide grant proposal, and opportunities for you to share your input on future directions. All with an interest in STEM Education research are encouraged to attend! This event is scheduled for Thursday, October 2, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, September 29.  Click here to register.

Coffee Chat — Information Literacy Learning Goal (10/7): Join the Information Literacy Goal Committee for a collaborative primer about integrating information literacy instruction effectively and efficiently in your course or degree program. Reminder: The Information Literacy University Student Learning Goal (USLG) will be assessed university wide this year. This timely workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, October 7 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Thursday, October 2.  Click here to register.

 


January and Early Feb

  • Coffee Chat — The Move to Online Evaluations (1/21)
  • Lunch and Learn — Academic Integrity (1/30)
  • Guest Speaker Luncheon — Ethics & Compliance with Tim Mazur (2/17)
  • Coffee Chat — ENGAGE: E3 as a means to improving FSI (2/18)

Coffee Chat — The Move to Online Evaluations: During fall semester, a new online teaching evaluation system was piloted at Michigan Tech. Students submitted more than 6000 teaching evaluations for more than 100 instructors – who got their results about one week after the end of the semester. In this Coffee Chat, we will discuss the move to a fully online system for spring semester, considering both what went well and what issues may need to be addressed in this change. Pilot participants are encouraged to attend to share their experiences. Pilot non-participants are also encouraged to join this discussion about the new evaluation process. Join us for this event on Tuesday, January 21 from 3:30-5pm. Click here to register.

Lunch and Learn — Academic Integrity: Recent events on many campuses, including Michigan Tech, highlight the importance of proactive systems to ensure academic integrity. Systems are needed to prevent cheating, evaluate questionable behaviors, and provide consequences/incentives that build a culture of integrity. Prior to this blended seminar, you’ll watch video interviews with several faculty and administrators working to build such systems. Then, you’ll select those you find most relevant for lunchtime discussion. This event will take place on Thursday, January 30 from 12 noon to 1pm. Click here to register.

— February Events —

Guest Speaker Luncheon — Ethics & Compliance: Tim Mazur is the Chief Operating Officer of the Ethics & Compliance Officer Association (ECOA), the world’s leading professional association for ethics and compliance officers. Tim will share his expertise with the campus at large in a luncheon session from noon-1pm Monday February 17. Tim’s more than 26 years of experience in business ethics includes serving as an officer at two Fortune 500 companies, implementing ethics/compliance programs, teaching business ethics at six universities, and delivering hundreds of speeches and training sessions. Lunch will be available for those who register by Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from a true Ethics and Compliance Expert! Click here to register.

Coffee Chat — ENGAGE: Gretchen Hein, Amber Kemppainen, and Nilufer Onder have received grants through two different branches of the National Science Foundation’s ENGAGE program. Gretchen and Amber have been working to create and implement “Everyday Examples in Engineering” (E3’s) in their instruction, and Nilufer has explored several ways to promote Faculty-Student Interaction (FSI). In this coffee chat, we’ll work through several E3’s and discuss how bringing your practical interests (and ducks!) into the classroom can provide motivation for and connection with your students. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Friday February 14. Join us for this event on Tuesday, February 18 from 3:30-4:30pm. Click here to register.


November

Blended Learning Grant Program: Please see the associated website for important information and (the fast approaching!) deadlines (Oct 31 & Nov 3) regarding this new grant opportunity.

New Module: Incorporating Information Literacy into Instruction: The Van Pelt and Opie Library and the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) invite faculty and graduate students to attend a new module that is part of the CTL’s University Teaching and Learning (UTL) Seminars program (see here for full curriculum). “Incorporating Information Literacy into Instruction” consists of three one-hour workshops on sequential Mondays (starting Nov. 4) presented by Instruction and Learning Librarian Sarah Lucchesi. This module will explore the library’s information resources, digital tools for keeping current in a field of study, and assignment elements that allow students to practice information literacy skills. Click here to register.

Coffee Chat – Ownership and Authorship: The recent campus visit by Chuck Valauskas, a Blended Learning IP lawyer, raised awareness of the need to clarify ownership and authorship rights and obligations at Michigan Tech. The University Senate Academic Policies committee, charged with writing a clear copyright policy, seeks faculty input through this coffee chat. For this coffee chat event on Tuesday, Nov 5, from 3:30-5pm, faculty will be asked to review several policies that might serve as a model, and come prepared for discussion. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Friday 11/1. Click here to register.

Coffee Chat — Communication Learning Goal: Are you addled by assessment? Rattled by rubrics? Confounded by communication? Join the Communication Learning Goal Task Force for a collaborative primer about applying the communication rubrics in your course and program. Reminder: The Communication University Student Learning Goal (USLG) is going to be assessed university wide this year. Join us for this timely workshop on Tuesday, November 12, from 3:30-5pm. Click here to register.

Lunch n’ Learn — Student Devices in the Classroom: Surveys show that more than 90% of students now carry an Internet connected “device” – a smartphone, tablet, or laptop – into classes.  During this session on Thursday, November 14, we’ll explore ways that these devices can be used for student/instructor interaction.  We’ll also discuss the challenges that accompany engaging or ignoring “devices”. Click here to register.

Faculty Orientation to the New Experimental Education Environment: Faculty, instructors and other interested educators are invited to learn about the features and uses of a new space dedicated to promoting innovation and testing of teaching strategies, technologies and creative learner-instructor arrangements. Sponsored, in part, by the Herman Miller Corporation, the overview sessions will be held throughout the day on Tuesday, Nov. 19. More information about the Experimental Education Environment (E3), as well as details regarding scheduling that space, can also be found on the same page with the registration links. Click here to register.