Tag Archives: integrity

September

COFFEE CHAT: Testing Center Scheduling Process (Thursday, September, 15)

The Michigan Tech Testing Center has grown by leaps and bounds over the past three years, prompting changes in staffing, software, and process. The changes have tried to better serve instructors, offer more flexibility to students, and allow a broader array of sponsored exams. In this Coffee Chat on Thursday, September 15, from 3:30-4:30pm, we’ll discuss the new registration process implemented this fall and get feedback about how the Testing Center can continue to improve. Refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, September 12. Click here to register.

LUNCH AND LEARN: Academic Integrity Student Survey Results (Tuesday, September 20)

In spring 2016, the Academic Integrity Committee surveyed Michigan Tech students from all levels and majors. In the more than 1500 responses received, students rated a variety of behaviors in terms of seriousness, and indicated how often they were observed.   In this luncheon event on Tuesday, September 20 from noon to 1pm, we’ll review aggregated responses and comments.  We’ll then highlight some surprising lessons for instructors regarding current student expectations in a learning environment. Lunch will be provided to those who register by Friday, September 16. Click here to register.

LUNCH AND LEARN: How Students Learn –  Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Thursday, September 29)

 A Pretty Model is, in Itself, More Engaging and Inspiring than Copious Content Extracted from our Minds:  Teachers often overrate the importance of their content and underrate their influence.  However, students forget much of the content that they memorize.  Thus, attempts to teach students all that they will need to know is futile.  Rather, it is important that students develop an interest and love for lifelong learning.  Inspiring and motivating students is critical because unless students are inspired and motivated our efforts are pointless.  Once students are inspired and motivated, there are countless resources available to learn more about a subject.  During this luncheon session, September 29, noon to 1:00pm, we will discuss the background and use of three strategies that are documented to inspire, engage and motivate our students. This event is co-sponsored by the Jackson CTL and the Department of Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology.   Click here to register.

PEDAGOGY WORKSHOP: How Students Learn – Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Thursday, September 29)

Shock and Awe Pedagogy: “Building” Bonds and Brains: The success of shock and awe pedagogy may be attributable, in part, to a powerful emotional connection.  Basic emotions including shock, anger, fear and sadness are shared by all humans.  When we experience emotion in our lives we tend to remember the experience.  In fact, the more emotional impact an experience has, the more intensely we remember its details and the more likely it will be stored in long-term memory.  In this workshop, September 29, 2:00 to 3:15pm, participants will be assigned to small groups based on similar expertise and develop and share one memorable pedagogical experience based on a model, humor or shocking performance. This event is co-sponsored by the Jackson CTL and the Department of Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology.   Click here to register.

KINESIOLOGY AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR: How Students Learn – Dr. Stephen DiCarlo (Professor in the School of Medicine, Wayne State University) (Friday, September 30)

Too Much Content, Not Enough Thinking, and Too Little Fun: Henry Ford, stated “Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is why so few people engage in it.”  This is also true in the classroom where the content driven curriculum leaves little time for thinking.  In this setting, information is transferred from the notes of one person to the notes of another person without going through the minds of either person.  That is, we spend too little time thinking about the information.  This is important because active processing of information, not just passive reception of that information, leads to learning. Specifically, we understand the information we think about because understanding is the residue of thinking.  Therefore, in this seminar, September 29, 3:00 to 4:00pm, we will discuss strategies to create a joy, an excitement, and a love for learning.  By making learning fun, our students will be impatient to run home, study, and contemplate–to really learn. No registration is required for the Friday KIP Department Seminar to be held in 101 ATDC.