Archives—November 2013

Spring 2015 Canvas Courses Available after Week 12

The new Canvas course shells for teaching Spring 2015 semester courses will become available after week 12. You should be able to access them over Thanksgiving break.  Once the upcoming semester’s Canvas courses become available there are a few things many instructors and instructional staff often want or need to do in Canvas.  We’ve included links to help you with a handful of them below.

You will probably need to Customize your Courses drop-down menu to remove any courses from previous semesters, and possibly add some course to that menu too. Instructors at Michigan Tech can use the Combine Canvas Sections tool on the CourseTools page to combine two or more BANNER sections into one Canvas course.  Go to Combining Canvas Sections for directions.  If you would like to copy the content in one of your previous Canvas courses into a new Spring 2014 Canvas course, you can do that too.  See Copying Content from Another Canvas Course to find out how.  If you would like to enroll a TA, additional instructors, etc. into your course, see Adding New Users to your Canvas Course.  And finally, you will need to Publish your Canvas course in order for your students to be able to see and access it.  See How do I publish my course? for directions.

You may just want some help or information.  You can Contact Support, or stop in to eLearning Walk-in Hours for Canvas Help.  And as always, for general information or help with Canvas at Michigan Tech, be sure to visit Canvas One Stop first.  The CTL Tip of the Week is brought to you by the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) at Michigan Tech.


New Feature: Relative Margins of Error in Canvas Quiz Formula Questions

Canvas has recently added yet another new feature to its Quizzes tool – Relative Error in Quiz Formula Questions.  Canvas will compute responses for Quiz Formula questions based on relative error in addition to absolute error. Margins of error can now be created as a percentage, not just as a point value (up to three decimal places).  More information can found on this page.

This new feature will not only be handy, but also even essential for mathematical questions in which the answer could vary by orders of magnitude.  If students are asked to use a formula to determine an answer that could vary between one and 100,000, then having to enter a realistic numerical margin of error could be impractical, if not impossible.  Expressing the margin of error as a percentage would work nicely though.  This is another important step in the process of Canvas maturing by responding to the needs of its customer base.

The CTL Tip of the Week is brought to you by the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). For more general information or help with Canvas at Michigan Tech, be sure to visit Canvas One Stop.