Tag Archives: John Vucetich

Isle Royale Wolf-Moose News Article in “Nature”

The monumental Isle Royale Wolf/Moose Study, which has been active for more than fifty years, has been a riveting drama to follow. In recent years, the wolf population has been in decline, raising questions as to the future of the wolf on Isle Royale. Below-average temperatures this winter have created an ice bridge between Isle Royale and the mainland, a fairly-rare and potentially promising event for the wolves of Isle Royale. Read what Michigan Tech’s Rolf Peterson and John Vucetich have to say on the subject in this week’s issue of Nature http://www.nature.com/news/iconic-island-study-on-its-last-legs-1.14697 and don’t miss the link to the editorial at the end of the article.


In the News – Peterson and Vucetich

A news story by Associated Press wire service about the latest research on the wolves and moose of Isle Royale National Park, conducted by Professor Emeritus Rolf Peterson and Associate Professor John Vucetich , was published by newspapers nationwide, including the San Francisco Chronicle and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It was also aired by radio and TV stations. See SF Gate.


The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has posted an eight-minute audio slide show on its web site about Michigan Tech’s ongoing wolf-moose research at Isle Royale National Park. The presentation features Professor Emeritus Rolf Peterson and Associate Professor John Vucetich, as well as their colleague, Michael Nelson, an environmental ethicist at Michigan State University. Although the audio slide show is accessible only to members of AAAS, a free three-day trial membership will enable you to see it. Sign up for the free trial membership at AAAS.


Special Volunteer Opportunity: Wolf-Moose Research Program

Isle Royale, Summer 2012. Isle Royale MooseJoin us in the field for a Moosewatch research expedition as part of the Wolf-Moose Study program on Isle Royale!
Do you have an interest in wildlife ecology and wolf-moose dynamics? Are you passionate about wilderness camping and our National Parks? Are you a hardy soul with a tolerance for bugs, lack of conveniences, and long days of rugged hiking? If so, please consider a special opportunity to volunteer for the renowned wolf-moose study at Isle Royale National Park. Expedition teams are being organized right now
Expedition #1: May 5–13, via Voyageur II, Grand Portage, MN
Expedition #2: May 14– 21, via Queen IV, Copper Harbor, MI
Expedition #3: May 26–June 3, via Voyageur II, Grand Portage, MN
Expedition #4: July 31–August 8, via Ranger III, Houghton, MI

Please visit www.isleroyalewolf.org (click on Research Expeditions) to learn about how you can participate this summer. You will find information about the Moosewatch research expeditions, photos, and how to apply. If you have specific questions, please contact Ken Vrana (kjvrana@mtu.edu), director, Isle Royale Institute.

We hope to see some of you on the island this summer!
John Vucetich and Leah Vucetich
Rolf Peterson and Candy Peterson




In the News: John Vucetich and Rolf Peterson

Assistant Professor John Vucetich and Research Professor Rolf Peterson contributed to “Great Lakes National Parks in Peril,” a report released Wednesday by the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council. The report fingers climate change as a cause for the slump in Isle Royale National Park’s moose population and the subsequent decline in the number of wolves. The report is available park.

Environmental Scientists Call North American Model of Wildlife Conservation Flawed

by Jennifer Donovan, director of public relations

Often touted as the greatest environmental achievement of the 20th century, the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation is anything but, according to wildlife ecologists and environmental ethicists from Michigan Tech and Michigan State University.

John Vucetich
Assistant Professor John Vucetich

Writing in the Summer 2011 issue of the journal, The Wildlife Professional, John Vucetich and Joseph Bump, Michigan State’s Michael Nelson, and Canadian environmental scientist Paul Paquet call the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation seriously flawed. The commentary is the first critique that the North American model has faced.

This model has been around as an idea for about a decade, and in that time it has become quite popular among some wildlife professionals. The model consists of two related approaches to conservation: a historical description of past conservation efforts and an ethical prescription for the future. “One rests upon an inadequate account of history and the other on an inadequate ethic,” Vucetich and Nelson say flatly.

The model’s misconception of history gives recreational hunters the sole credit for preventing the ravages of wildlife exploitation caused by commercial hunting in the 19th century. It cites the efforts of famous hunters such as Theodore Roosevelt.

Joesph Bump
Assistant Professor Joesph Bump

“Recreational hunting was only one of several important factors that led to improved conservation in North America,” the authors say. Since the 1960s, they point out, conservation efforts have been led by non-hunters and nature enthusiasts, such as national park visitors and bird-watchers.

The historical narrative crediting recreational hunters with spearheading the drive for wildlife conservation in turn becomes the rationale for a belief that recreational hunting is necessary for wildlife conservation. Then that becomes a prescription for future conservation efforts.

The entire construct is misguided, say Nelson and Vucetich. “The principle of past behavior is not, by itself, an appropriate justification for future behavior,” they explain. “Would you argue that society should perpetuate slave labor or gender discrimination simply because such practices are part of our history? Likewise it is wrong to conclude that hunting should play a central role in future conservation efforts, simply because it has in the past.”

The scientists also express concern that the interests of recreational hunters sometimes conflict with conservation principles. For example, they say, wildlife management conducted in the interest of hunters can lead to an overabundance of animals that people like to hunt, such as deer, and the extermination of predators that also provides a vital balance to the ecosystem.

Vuetich and Nelson examine the seven tenets of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation:

    • Wildlife is held in the public trust.
    • Commerce in dead animals is illegal.
    • Wildlife use is allocated through law.
    • Hunting is an opportunity for all.
    • Wildlife may only be killed for legitimate reasons.
    • Wildlife is an international resource.
    • Science is the basis for wildlife protection.

Consider the tenet that says wildlife may only be killed for legitimate reasons,” the authors observe. “This principle is as basic and appropriate as it is void of useful insight about defining a legitimate purpose. The North American Model provides no further insight about what counts as legitimate,” they note.

The scientists also raise a question about the final tenet, that science is the basis for wildlife protection. “This equates a desire for policies informed by science with science itself determining what policies ought to be adopted,” they say. “Scientific facts about nature cannot, by themselves, determine how we ought to relate to nature or which policies are most appropriate.”

The authors emphasize that they have nothing against hunting. “If the North American Model’s primary motivation was to promote hunting, and even if it did so transparently, the model would still fall short,” they say.

The model’s greatest value, Vucetich and Nelson say, is that it calls attention to the need to confront a more basic question: What is conservation? “All of us should explore whether wildlife management and conservation are the same or whether they represent different, occasionally conflicting goals,” they suggest. “We still need answers for key questions like: What does it mean for a population or ecosystem to be healthy? How does conservation relate to or conflict with other legitimate values, such as social justice, human liberty and concern for the welfare of the individual? Resolving these and other questions could provide a truly meaningful conservation model.”



Vucetich and Bump receive Excellence Award

Associate Professor John Vucetich and Assistant Professor Joseph Bump, members of the Conservation Ethics Group (CEG), were recently awarded the 2011 Michigan State University  Phi Kappa Phi Excellence Award in Interdisciplinary Scholarship . The award specified the highly unique collaboration between the social and ecological sciences with ethics, the large amount of community engagement, and the highly productive research and publication record of CEG members as especially impressive and the main reasons for the award.