All posts by ehgroth

Community Lecture: Natural History and (un)natural future of plants in Keweenaw and Isle Royale

mar17On Tuesday, March 17, Kareena Schmidt, expert on natural plant communities, will lead a discussion about Keweenaw plants. The event is part of a monthly series of sessions on the Geoheritage and Natural History of the Keweenaw, at the Carnegie Museum in Houghton. The discussions are aimed at the general public, but discuss current research and science.

Ms Schmidt explains her discussion: “Geologically, Isle Royale and the Keweenaw Peninsula reflect each other quite nicely. Bedrock twins one could say. Botanically, too, the spare acidic soils maneuvered by glaciers are the substrate to a host of plants that manage to survive dynamic influences of Lake Superior. Historically humans, in their quest for cash, mined for copper and harvested magnificent old-growth forests; their actions radically altered the vegetative landscape, even more than a beaver or moose could ever dream. Isle Royale and the Keweenaw have recovered quite differently from these ventures for a variety of reasons we will explore.

There is no end to the botanical delights that await discovery and understanding. Many plants here are western disjuncts, primarily having home base in the Pacific Northwest. Many arctic species reach their southern-most limit. Plants readily identified with more southerly climes reach their northern-most limit, putting down roots yet declaring thus far and no farther. Unique too are large and diverse populations of orchids, heathers and lichens all of which have evolved unique and admirable adaptations to abide in the spectacular Keweenaw terrain..”

The Carnegie Museum of the Keweenaw, located at Huron & Montezuma in downtown Houghton. Seminars are held in the recently restored Community Room on the ground level of this historic building. Lectures are free, open to the public, and barrier free (wheelchair accessible). For each monthly lecture, the museum will open at 6:30 pm for refreshments; lectures and discussion occur from 7:00 to 8:00 pm. Please contact the Museum for further information, 906-482-7140.

GMES Lecture: Hematite Formation – Metamorphic, Tectonic and Hydrothermal Controls

feb16Geological and Mining Engineering Department Lecture:

Fernando R.M. Pires – UERJ (Rio de Janeiro State University) (PhD MTU, 1979)
“HEMATITE FORMATION – METAMORPHIC, TECTONIC AND HYDROTHERMAL CONTROLS”
Monday – February 16 at 3:00 p.m., 875 Dow Environmental Sciences Bldg. All are welcome!

Fernando R.M. Pires – UERJ (Rio De Janeiro State University) (PhD MTU, 1979) Pires presented a Lecture: "Hematite Formation - Metamorphic, Tectonic and Hydrothermal Controls"; Dr Jorma Kalliokoski was his doctoral advisor at Michigan Tech;
Fernando R.M. Pires – UERJ (Rio De Janeiro State University) (PhD MTU, 1979) Pires presented a Lecture: "Hematite Formation – Metamorphic, Tectonic and Hydrothermal Controls"; Jorma Kalliokoski was his doctoral advisor at Michigan Tech;

Abstract:
Quadrilatero Ferrifero (QF) displays an astonishing morphology consisting of high elevation peaks built in itabirite, massive, compact and/or banded laminated hematite, brecciated hematite and also composed of quartzites and itacolomites (flexible quartzite) at Caraça and Itacolomi Peaks in altitudes over 6 000 feet or 3 000m. The origin of the itabirite which presents different compositions exhibits a yellow, fine-grained, very hard and finely disseminated magnetite in a rock similar to the Minnesota taconite, possibly a volcanic origin. Predominant type, the siliceous itabirite is a BIF, a metamorphic rock largely distributed in QF containing numerous hematite bodies. Itabirite is a banded/laminated rock, with Fe-oxides (magnetite and hematite)-quartz-amphiboles and pyroxenes (grunerite, cummingtonite, actinolite-tremolite, riebeckite, aegirine) distributed into grunerite, cummingtonite and actinolite-tremolite zones. Garnet appears at higher grade and hypersthene under the highest metamorphic zone outside QF. Hematite forms concordant bodies displaying different types of structure mostly banded and laminated, schistose, micaceous, foliated formed during sin-metamorphic deformation produced by strong mylonitic process. Microscopic studies demonstrated that the hematite laths are arranged in LPO (lattice preferred orientation) or GSPO (grain shape preferred orientation). Banding/lamination (S0-planes) is deformed in recumbent folds with axial planes (S1) refolded with axial planes (S2) exhibiting sigmoidal structure, coplanar micro-breccia, hematite boudins cemented by hematite, pinch-and-swell, meso- and micro-folded specular hematite and mylonitic texture is common. Blue dust hematite was formed along extremely deformed and squeezed hematite along mylonitic zones. Large masses of isotropic, compact and massive hematite produced by regional hydrothermal process and meso- and micro-brecciated hematite cemented by hematite or quartz represent second or third generation of hematite. “Espelho de macaco” or monkey’s mirror which represents non deformed, perfectly crystallized hematite is found within metric pockets in the itabirite or within pods in BT (brown terrena) associated with quartz, imperial topaz, kaolinite and muscovite. Chemical potential diagrams µH2O-µSiO2 applied to the metamorphic reactions and µH2O-µH+ adapted to the hydrothermal condition, respectively, such as 7 Fe3O4+ 8 SiO2 + H2O = 7 Fe2O3 + Fe7Si8O22(OH)2 representing destabilization of magnetite and 2Fe3O4 + H2O = 3 Fe2O3 + H+, are applied in both metamorphic and hydrothermal situations. Apparently magnetite constitutes a primary phase and tends to succumb. Fluid inclusions in quartz related to hematite and internal process of oxidation in LWR (Light Water Reactors), allowed the preparation of PT-diagrams which indicated 2500C-3000C and 2-4kbar. Under metamorphic conditions of granulite facies hematite is not stable and hypersthene-magnetite pair is common.

Fernando R.M. Pires Family with  Jorma Kalliokoski
Fernando R.M. Pires Family with Jorma Kalliokoski

Lecture: Using Mineral Spectroscopy for Geothermal Exploration

calvinGeological and Mining Engineering Department Lecture:
Dr. Wendy Calvin, Professor of Geophysics & Remote Sensing
Director, Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, University of Nevada – Reno
“Using Mineral Spectroscopy for Geothermal Exploration”
Friday – February 13 at 4:00 p.m., 642 Dow Environmental Sciences Bldg.
Visiting Women & Minority Lecturer/Scholar Series funded by: A grant to the Office of Institutional Equity from the State of Michigan’s King-Chavez-Parks Initiative, the EPSSI and Geological and Mining Engineering Departments of Michigan Tech University; Reception to follow in the Dow 6th floor Lakeside Atrium

Dr.-Ing. Rudolf “Rudy” Greuer Passes Away

RudolfGreuerDr.-Ing. Rudolf “Rudy” Greuer of Houghton, Professor Emeritus of Mining Engineering at Michigan Tech, passed away on Sunday, January 18th, 2015 in Michigan’s Copper Country. Rudy was born on April 6th, 1927, in Guetzlaffshagen, German Pomerania. Rudy was a veteran of World War II, serving in the German armed forces prior to spending a period of Soviet captivity as a prisoner of war. After his military service and during his studies, Rudy worked as a miner in metal, coal, and potash mines in Germany and the United Kingdom. He attended the School of Mines in Freiberg, East Germany from 1948 to 1950. He later graduated with a Diplom (Masters) of Engineering in Mining Engineering from the Technical University at Clausthal, West Germany in 1953. He was granted the Doctor of Engineering in 1955 from the Technical University in Mining Engineering.

After receiving his doctorate, Rudy spent time on a fellowship through the Government of South Africa performing advanced studies and research on ventilation at Witwatersrand University in Johannesburg, South Africa. His next appointment was as Lecturer at the Technical University in Istanbul, Turkey, before accepting a position as a Senior Engineer at the West German Coal Mining Research Center in Essen, where he was also German representative to the European Community’s Committees on Mine Fires and Mine Ventilation. After ten years in this role, Rudy came to Michigan Tech’s Department of Mining Engineering in 1967 as an Associate Professor. He was later promoted to full Professor and held the position of Head of the Mining Engineering Department from 1980 to 1989.

Beginning in the 1950’s, Rudy pioneered the use of electronic digital computers for mine ventilation planning and is best known for a series of computer programs used for transient state simulation of ventilation and fire protection systems for underground mines and high rise buildings. Some of Rudy’s awards have included the Michigan Tech Faculty Research Award; a Special Achievement Award by the U.S. Bureau of Mines; the Performance Award from the U.S. Bureau of Mines; and the Society for Mining and Exploration (SME) Howard L. Hartman Award at the 1999 U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium. Rudy has worked as an international consultant for the United States government and in the private sector, and participated in notable forensic investigations such as the 1972 Sunshine Mine disaster in Idaho’s Silver Valley and the 1980 MGM Grand Hotel fire in Las Vegas. During his tenure at Michigan Tech and while under contract with the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Rudy was instrumental in the development of MFIRE, a groundbreaking simulation program for mine ventilation and fire modelling which lent the source code to current industry-standard simulation programming. In 1998 he retired from Michigan Tech. Rudy was also a longtime member of the Upper Peninsula section of Society of Mining and Exploration (SME) of the American Institute of Mining Engineers (AIME).

Rudy was an enthusiastic traveler and who particularly enjoyed working and spending time in China, and tied his travels throughout the Middle East together with his passions for ancient history, having once boasted that he has visited every single place mentioned in both the Old and New Testaments. He was married to Adelheid “Heidi” Greuer (Teichman) for 51 years, and is survived by wife Heidi of Houghton, daughter Friederike (Gast) of Chassell, son Wilhelm of Marquette, and grand-daughter Lilli Gast.

Service Information:
When: Friday, January 23rd, 2015, 1:00pm
Officiating: Rev. Bucky Beach
Location: Memorial Chapel Funeral Home

Obituary Webpage

GreuerRudy_Tribute1

AIME Field Trip 1070
AIME Field Trip 1070

Some pictures from the past in Michigan Tech Mining Engineering

AIME Section Meeting
AIME Section Meeting
Rudy and Heidi Greuer
Rudy and Heidi Greuer
Mining Engineering Department Photo
Mining Engineering Department Photo

Indigenous Cultural Elements of Keweenaw and Isle Royale: Community Lecture/Discussion

Indigenous Cultural Elements of Keweenaw and Isle Royale: Community Lecture/Discussion

On Tuesday, February 24, MTU Professor Emerita Susan Martin, expert on Prehistoric Archeology and ancient copper, will lead a discussion about ancient cultural elements of our region. She will be joined by Seth dePasqual, Cultural Resource Manager at Isle Royale National Park. The event is part of a monthly series of sessions on the Geoheritage and Natural History of the Keweenaw, at the Carnegie Museum in Houghton. The discussions are aimed at the general public, but discuss current research and science.

Professor Martin explains her discussion: “My discussion will center on the long human history of the Keweenaw Peninsula, with side trips to other parts of the Lake Superior Basin. I will discuss the many cultures that made the UP their home, and introduce some of the raw materials, including stone (lithics) and copper, that they used to build their liveways. I will be joined by Seth dePasqual of Isle Royale National Park, who will bring us up to date on current Isle Royale archaeological research..”

The Carnegie Museum of the Keweenaw, located at Huron & Montezuma in downtown Houghton. Seminars are held in the recently restored Community Room on the ground level of this historic building. Lectures are free, open to the public, and barrier free (wheelchair accessible). For each monthly lecture, the museum will open at 6:30 pm for refreshments; lectures and discussion occur from 7:00 to 8:00 pm. Please contact the Museum for further information, 906-482-7140.

weblink: http://www.geo.mtu.edu/~raman/SilverI/CarnegieSem/Feb.html

News Briefs in GMES Department

A Q&A with George Robinson, retired curator at the A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum and geology professor, was published in EARTH. The recent donation of a significant Russian tourmaline to the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum was highlighted, along with a color photo, in the magazine Rocks and Minerals, Museum Notes published January/February 2015. The tourmaline was donated to the museum by long-term museum supporter Bill Shelton of Tucson, Arizona, who specializes in collecting Russian minerals.

Joshua Pearce (MSE/ECE) was quoted in a story “Can Open Source Really Work

Associate Professor Aleksey Smirnov’s (GMES) research on the rapid movement of the North American tectonic plate a long time ago was reported on the science news website Science Around Michigan.

Technology Century, a news wire published by the Engineering Society of Detroit, featured a story about Assistant Professor Jason Gulley’s (GMES) research in ice caves in the Arctic.

Simon Carn (GMES/EPSSI) has received $9,892 from the University of Maryland College Park for the first year of a potential three-year project that will total $107,472. The title of the research project is “Extending NASA’s Long-Term Satellite Data Records: Advanced SO2 and NO2 Measurements from Suomi NPP OMPS.”

Alexandria Guth published “Volcanic Volumes Associated with the Kenya Rift: Recognition and Correction of Preservation Biases” in Geological Society, London, Special Publications.

Simon Carn (GMES/EPSSI) has received $13,485 for the first year of a potential three-year project totaling $167,600 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center. The project is titled “Volcanic SO2 and Ash Products from EPIC Observations.”

GMES PhD student, Elisa Piispa, has won an Outstanding Student Presentation Award at the American Geophysical Union’s annual meeting. The title of Elisa’s presentation was “Paleomagnetism of the 1.1 Ga Baraga-Marquette dykes (Michigan, USA)”. The AGU Annual meeting was held in San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2014. Piispa’s PhD advisor is Aleksey Smirnov.

Upper Peninsula Second Wave, a website featuring UP news, published an article about the under-ice research being done by Tech’s GLRC.

Assistant Professor Thomas Oommen (GMES/CEE) is mentioned in the December 2014 issue of the ASCE’s Civil Engineering Magazine. Oommen is collaborating with researchers from the University of Arkansas and Idaho State University to develop a device that could help detect post-wildfire landslides through remote sensing.

Thomas Oommen (GMES/MTTI) has received $116,864 from the University of Arkansas for a two-year research project, “Remote Sensing Based Assessment System for Evaluating Risk to Transportation Infrastructure Following Wildfires.”

Continue reading

MESTA to Award Salotti Earth Science Education Award

Since 1999, the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum has recognized individuals for excellence in earth science education with the Charles A. Salotti Earth Science Education Award. Now the mineral museum has a new partner in selecting the awardee: the Michigan Earth Science Teachers Association (MESTA).

Thanks to the efforts of museum director Ted Bornhorst and Tiger Salotti, wife of the late Charles Salotti, MESTA has agreed to promote the Salotti Award, solicit nominations and select the awardee.   Continue reading

Community Natural History Seminar about Local Wildlife by Prof. Rolf Peterson

image23337-scolOn Tuesday, December 16, Professor Rolf Peterson, MTU expert on Wildlife Ecology, will lead a discussion titled “Animal Elements of Keweenaw Peninsula and Isle Royale”. The event is part of a monthly series of sessions on the Geoheritage and Natural History of the Keweenaw, at the Carnegie Museum in Houghton. The discussions are aimed at the general public, but discuss current research and science.   Continue reading

EPSSI Seminar: Shock Tube Recreations of Shock Waves and Jets Generated During Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

The Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Institute
proudly presents:
Ezequiel Medici, MTU ME-EM Research Engineer
The EPSSI seminar for Monday, December 1, 4:00 p.m., M&M U113

“Shock Tube Recreations of Shock Waves and Jets Generated During Explosive Volcanic Eruptions”

Abstract: At the beginning of a suddenly explosive volcanic eruptions two types of phenomena can be observed, the formation of a shock wave immediately followed by a supersonic jet of expanding vapor-solid-liquid mixture. The intensity of the shock wave and the structure of the supersonic jet can carry a significant amount of information about the intensity and the dynamics of the volcanic eruption. Despite the hazard they represent to the immediate surrounding area of the volcano vent, these atmospheric shock waves and the subsequent sonic wave can be safely measured at a long distance from the vent. This characteristic makes the measurement of shock/sonic waves suitable for safe, real-time remote sensing of the conditions at the volcanic vent during the eruption. Preliminary results, based on the experiment performed on the shock tube, indicate a strong correlation between the energy released by the eruption, calculated by standard methods post eruption, and the intensity of the shock wave as measured through its pressure field. This correlation could ultimately lead to a more reliable model of shock/sound wave propagation which will serve as an early warning system for the air traffic control.

Immediately after the shock wave, an over pressurized jet mixture of vapor, solid particles, and liquid begins to expand. This mixture typically contains a relatively high concentration of solid particles of different size. To study the coupled interaction between the expanding gas and the particles, a series of analog explosive volcanic experiments using the atmospheric shock tube were performed. High-speed shadowgraph imaging of the expanding jet mixtures is recorded for different initial jet energy, particle sizes and particle concentrations. The study and observations of the interaction between the mixture of expanding gas and particles can elucidate the mechanisms acting during the initial stage of the formation of ash plumes or pyroclastic flows.