Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences

Posts under the ‘News’ category

Jeremy Shannon wins Outstanding Faculty Award

Monday, April 14th, 2014

On April 13, about 250 students gathered for the 2014 Greek Life Awards in the MUB Ballroom representing the Michigan Tech Fraternities and Sororities. This is the eighth year of the awards ceremony, but it was the first year for the Outstanding Faculty Award to be included in the program. The Outstanding Faculty Award for 2014 was presented to Jeremy Shannon.

Order of Omega, the Greek Life Honor Society that coordinates the awards, wanted to find a way to recognize the faculty members that the students consider to be the most outstanding. There are almost 500 students in fraternities and sororities at Michigan Tech, and Order of Omega really wanted to emphasize that this award would be coming directly from the students.

The following faculty members were nominated by members of the Greek community and were recognized at the 2014 Greek Life Awards Ceremony:
* Mari Buche (SBE)
* William Sproule (CEE)
* John Durocher (Bio Sci)
* Jeremy Shannon (GMES)
* Marika Seigel (HU)

Research News in GMES Department

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Society of Exploration Geophysicists’ news website reported on three new Geoscientists Without Borders projects, including one in Guatemala led by assistant professor Thomas Oommen (GMES).

Simon Carn (GMES) has received a $16,772 grant for “Improving Constraints on Volcanic CO2 Emissions from the Vanuatu Arc” from the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

Guy Meadows (GLRC) has received $25,000 for the first year of a potential two-year project from the University of Michigan for “Restoring, Retrofitting and Recoupling Michigan’s Great Lakes Shorelands in the Face of Global Climate Disruption.”

Colleen Mouw (GMES/GLRC) has been awarded a four-year, $82,739 research grant from the National Science Foundation for “Collaborative Research: Continuation and Enhancement of MPOWIR.”

Colleen Mouw (GMES) has received $228,117 for the first year of a three-year $667,117 research grant from NASA for “Parameterizing Spectral Characteristics of Optically Active Constituents in Inland Water for Improved Satellite Retrieval.” (more…)

Rachael Pressley wins 1st place

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Congratulations to Rachael Pressley, Senior Geology student on winning 1st place in the Undergraduate Student Poster competition last Friday. Her project

“Questioning Uplift Rates for Suwannee River Basin, Florida”
was under the direction of Dr. Jason Gulley.

She will present this again for World Water Day on Wednesday, March 26, from 4-5pm in the Dow Lobby (campus side).

Very proud of her accomplishment!!

Environmental Engineering Seminar: Nuts and Bolts of Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Environmental Engineering Seminar: Nuts and Bolts of Unconventional Oil and Gas Development including all you might like to know about the technology and practice of hydraulic fracturing
Wayne D Pennington, Interim Dean, College of Engineering, Michigan Technological University
Mon Mar 24, 2014 3pm – 4pm, Dow 642
Watch the seminar Video on Vimeo: Unconventional Oil and Gas Development: Technology and Practice of Hydraulic Fracturing

Over the past couple of decades, technology has been developed to produce oil and gas from geological formations that had been overlooked previously due to the lack of appropriate engineering techniques for those types of formations. As a result, the energy picture for the USA and for the world has been seriously modified, and the impact is being felt.
These “unconventional” deposits contain hydrocarbons in significant quantities, but they were locked up in microscopic pores that were at best poorly connected to each other, limiting or preventing flow through the rocks. Existing technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing (in use since 1948) and extended-reach horizontal wellbores were used independently, and then merged, for a highly successful, efficient, and safe method of oil and gas production.
The geologic formations, and the production techniques used in each, that are described in this presentation include: (a) “tight” gas sandstone deposits (produced through multiple-stage hydraulic fracturing in vertical wells); (b) coal deposits (methane produced by drawing down water pressure to release gas from the coal structure; also the source of many “flaming faucets” from domestic water-wells); and (c) shale deposits (generally using multiple-stage hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells).

GMES 2014 MSGC Awardees Announced

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Michigan Tech faculty, staff members and students received awards tallying $71,175 in funding through the Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC) sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
Graduate students receiving $5,000 graduate fellowships are:

Emily Gochis (Geological and Mining Engineering): “Increasing Native American Involvement in Geosciences Through Interdisciplinary Community-Based Student Investigations”

Brice Grunert (Geological and Mining Engineering): “Impacts of Physical Drivers on Phytoplankton Community Composition in the Bering Sea”

Faculty and staff members receiving $5,000 or more for pre-college, public outreach, teacher training, and/or augmentation programs are:

Alexandria Guth (Geological and Mining Engineering): “Teacher Institute: Exploring the Geology of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula”

John Gierke (Geological and Mining Engineering): “Professional Development for Teachers to Incorporate Place-Based and Culturally Centered Earth System Investigations in Pre-college Curricula at Native American Community Schools” (Includes Augmentation funding)

For other awards see Tech Today

NASA implemented the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1989 to provide funding for research, education, and public outreach in space-related science and technology. The program has 52 university-based consortia in the United States and Puerto Rico. As an affiliate of the Michigan Consortium, Michigan Tech has been an active participant in MSGC for over fifteen years. For more information, please contact Robert Warrington or Paige Hackney in the Institute for Leadership and Innovation.

Former Peace Corps Volunteer and Geoscientist Welcomed as New Geoscience Communication Fellow

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Alexandria, VA – The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) and Schlumberger welcome former Peace Corps volunteer and geoscientist, Stephanie Tubman as the AGI/Schlumberger Geoscience Communication Fellow. Through a generous donation from Schlumberger, a global service provider to the oil and gas industry, Tubman will be working with AGI’s Critical Issues Program to disseminate geoscience information to help support decision making at the federal, state and municipal levels.

“The goal of the Critical Issues program is to provide decision makers with clear, relevant and quickly digestible information about the geosciences, without oversimplifying the science.” Tubman said of her new post. During the first month of her fellowship she has already written a factsheet that was distributed at a congressional briefing commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Good Friday Earthquake. Throughout her fellowship, Tubman will be investigating other topics and ways to deliver geoscience information to decision makers.

Tubman pursued geoscience because of her passion for connecting with the environment and her desire to help others do the same. Following her undergraduate degree at Colgate University she completed an internship at the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory and enrolled in Michigan Tech’s Peace Corps Master’s International program in Geohazards Mitigation. During her two-year tour in Guatemala with the Peace Corps, she was assigned to a municipal environmental office, collaborating with local officials on water management, environmental science education and ecotourism projects. Her experience working at the municipal level made her an ideal candidate for her work with the Critical Issues program.

Tubman first heard about the fellowship when attending a reception hosted by AGI at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting.

“Science is an important tool,” Tubman stated, “I’m looking forward to engaging with different decision-making communities to understand how they use information and how we can help to meet their needs for geoscience information.”

For more information on the Center for Critical Issues: http://bit.ly/1fFF2uw

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The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society’s use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with
the environment.

Team Places 3rd in Society of Exploration Geophysicists Challenge

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

At a recent student “Challenge Bowl” competition organized by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists at the University of Oklahoma, a team of Michigan Tech students came in third. They were the only team composed of undergraduates to make the final round and they were also the only team with any females to make the finals.

“This is the third year that Michigan Tech students have participated in this competition, and our students consistently perform extremely well,” said Wayne Pennington, interim dean of engineering and faculty advisor for the Michigan Tech student section of SEG. “This year’s team consisted entirely of undergraduates, and they were up against formidable opposition from advanced graduate students, defeating almost all of them. We are very proud of their performance, and I personally am very pleased that Neala Creasy and Stephanie Dow were the students who chose to compete on our behalf.”

Michigan Tech Students Head to Detroit for Alternative Spring Break

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Students from the Michigan Tech National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) visited seven middle and high schools in Detroit over their Spring Break, March 11-14, 2014, to promote college and engineering to K-12 students. Two GMES students were in the group, Simisola Arogundade and Samantha Fentress. In the evenings, they conducted Family Engineering Night events at three K-8 schools. NSBE’s Alternative Spring Break is conducted in collaboration with the Detroit Public Schools Office of Science and the Detroit Math & Science Center, and funded in part, with a grant from John Deere.

WXYZ Channel 7 news in Detroit aired a feature story about an interview with Michigan Tech NSBE student chapter members in Detroit, working to motivate middle and high school students in Detroit schools to see college in their futures and to study science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Read More about Michigan Tech Students Head to Detroit for Alternative Spring Break

Michigan Tech NSBE students Family Engineering session at classroom in Detroit shown here in a photo from 2014

Environmentally and Socially Responsible Mining Presentation

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

Hannah White, public outreach manager at Northwest Mining Association, a national nonprofit, nonpartisan trading association representing the entire mining life cycle, from exploration to reclamation and closure. Their purpose is to advocate and advance, educate, and foster and promote environmentally and socially responsible mining. She spoke to students in a seminar on November 19th. More info

(more…)

Michigan Tech Students Win First Place in National Mining Competition

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

The National Mining Competition announced the three winners from the 2013 event. First place Michigan Tech, second place University of British Columbia, and third place Edwards School of Business.

The winning Michigan Tech Mining team, “the fabulous four,” was Cora Hemmila, Matthew Younger, Matthew Schuman and Matthew Schwalen. The team advisor is James Murray Gillis, Instructor, Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Director, Mine Safety and Health Training Program. (more…)

Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences

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Fax: 906-487-3371
Email: geo@mtu.edu

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