One-Celled Plants Key to Understanding Changes in the Great Lakes

Colleen Mouw calls herself an oceanographer “with one foot in the ocean and the other in the Great Lakes.” An assistant professor in Michigan Technological University’s Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences and the University’s Great Lakes Research Center, she is using satellite-based remote sensing technology to develop new and better ways to measure and understand the changes occurring in the Great Lakes.

MORE

New Funding for Great Lakes Research

Guy Meadows (GLRC) has received $25,000 for the first year of a potential two-year project from the University of Michigan for “Restoring, Retrofitting and Recoupling Michigan’s Great Lakes Shorelands in the Face of Global Climate Disruption.”

Colleen Mouw (GMES/GLRC) has been awarded a four-year, $82,739 research grant from the National Science Foundation for “Collaborative Research: Continuation and Enhancement of MPOWIR.”

Governing Transboundary Waters Canada, the United States and Indigenous Communities

Emma S. Norman, assistant professor of geography (SS/GLRC) has just been named a research associate with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. This affiliation will allow her direct access to Smithsonian materials for research and educational purposes and also provide her the opportunity to collaborate with Smithsonian employees. The first project she is undertaking is to work with their staff cartographer and senior geographer to create a series of maps that show the changing settlement patterns of indigenous peoples along the Canada-US border (pre- and post-contact) and how those patterns impact access to and governance of water. These maps will appear in her forthcoming book, Transboundary Water Governance: Canada, the United States, and Indigenous Communities (Routledge) and will also also be made publicly available through the Smithsonian. Read about it online Governing Transboundary Waters.

Project Learning Tree workshop in Detroit

Joan Chadde, education program coordinator, Michigan Tech Center for Science and Environmental Outreach, conducted a Project Learning Tree workshop for 15 Detroit Public School teachers on Feb. 1, in Detroit at the Belle Isle Nature Zoo, as part of the third year of a US Forest Service grant to integrate urban and community forestry into the middle/high school curriculum, including the benefits of trees, how to assess forest health, forest stewardship and careers in forestry and natural resources.