2014 Lake Superior Water Festival Thursday, October 23

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Lake Superior Water Festival: Students Flood Great Lakes Research Center

The 2014 Water Festival was held in the Great Lakes Research Center on Thursday, Oct. 23. Almost 1,000 students in grades four through eight from local school districts were registered to attend.

News article from Daily Mining Gazette Water festival offers hands-on science

Article and Video from Upper Michigan Source Water Festival draws over 1,000 middle schoolers to Michigan Tech

Water Festival at Michigan Tech Read the Michigan Tech news story

Article and video from ABC News 10: Students learn about Lake Superior at MTU’s Water Festival 

Students spent a half-day on campus and attended four 35-minute activities. The Water Festival is designed to offer students engaging Great-Lakes-based content taught by Tech scientists, students and community experts (including artists and historians).

Activities offered include remotely operated vehicles, non-native invasive species, Great Lakes monitoring, land and water stewardship, Keweenaw geology, the aquatic food web, fish ecology and more.

“The Water Festival will provide an opportunity for students to learn about and celebrate our most precious natural resource: clean, fresh water,” said Joan Chadde, education program coordinator. “We will present a wide variety of topics related to the Great Lakes, from science and engineering to social studies and the arts.”

October 23 Water Festival for Grades 4-8 from 8:45 to 3:00 pm at the Great Lakes Research Center:

View slide of Pictures of Lake Superior Water Festival

View Videos clips about Lake Superior Water Festivals

Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech
Lake Superior Water Festival October 23, 2014 at the Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Tech

Flyer

Water Festival Homepage More information

Recent Seminars at Great Lakes Research Center

A series of Center for Water & Society Seminars took place in September. Dr. Ellen Spears, Environmental Historian; University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Topic: “Circulating Toxics: PCBs and the Campaign for Toxic Chemical Policy Reform” at the Great Lakes Research Center and a second seminar was presented with the Topic: “Toxic Knowledge: Race, Pollution, and Social Movements for Environmental Justice”
CWS is a co-sponsor of this visit, along with Social Sciences and the Visiting Women & Minority Lecture Series

Dr. Ellen Spears, Environmental Historian ; University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Dr. Ellen Spears, Environmental Historian ; University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

Dr. Celia Chen, Research Professor, Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, gave a seminar with the topic “Factors Controlling Mercury Fate in Aquatic Food Webs”
The Center for Water & Society was a co-sponsor of this visit, along with Biological Sciences and the Visiting Women & Minority Lecture Series (VWMLS) funded by the President’s Office and a grant to the Office of Institutional Equity from the State of Michigan’s King-Chavez-Parks Initiative.
Dr. Colleen Mouw of Michigan Tech and Dr. Celia Chen, Research Professor; Biological Sciences, Dartmouth
Dr. Colleen Mouw of Michigan Tech and Dr. Celia Chen, Research Professor; Biological Sciences, Dartmouth

The Big Superior Storm

A particularly strong rain and windstorm Tuesday night caused the waves in Lake Superior to reach 14.5 feet off the North Entry of the Portage Waterway near Houghton. The water temperature also dropped a dramatic 20 degrees from the surface of the big lake to the bottom.

Guy Meadows, director of the Great Lakes Research Center, is calling it “The Big Superior Storm.”

“I am continually amazed at how fast this big lake changes,” Meadows said. “This not only includes how fast it responds to the wind in generating very large waves, but also how fast its temperature changes in response to storm forcing—like 20 degrees in the past day—but also how fast it responded to last winter’s big chill.”

Waves on Lake Superior West Shore
Waves on Lake Superior West Shore

Meadows and his team of Great Lakes Research Center scientists are studying Lake Superior, its physical, biological and meteorological characteristics. They bring the expertise of many disciplines to their research; there are engineers who are doing biology and biologists who are doing engineering.

Their goal is to understand the rate and magnitude of changes in the Great Lakes so that engineers can design physical structures like pipelines and bridges appropriately.

For more on Lake Superior and other Great Lakes research being conducted at Michigan Tech, see Great Lakes Research Center.

See a video clip of the Waves

Waves in Lake Superior to reach 14.5 feet off the North Entry of the Portage Waterway
North Entry buoy wave height graph and a video take by Colin Tyrrell.
Big Lake Superior waves shown on NOAA GLERL Nowcast image from Sep 11, 2014
Big Lake Superior waves shown on NOAA GLERL Nowcast image from Sep 11, 2014

2014 Green Lecture Series: Rethinking Local Energy Choices & Costs

2014 Green Lecture Series presents:
Rethinking Local Energy Choices & Costs
By Abhilash Kantamneni, PhD student, MTU Dept. of Computer Science

Date & Time: Thursday, September 11, 7:00-8:30 pm

Location: G002 Hesterberg Hall, Forestry Building, Michigan Tech
Cost: FREE Enjoy coffee, tea & refreshments

About the Lecture:
Residents of our community pay the 2nd highest electricity rates among the 48 contiguous United States, and almost twice as much as the rest of Michigan! Despite our large number of heating degree days and high electricity rates, much of our local population cannot afford to invest in energy-saving technologies and appliances as they are already struggling to simply make ends meet. Our electricity rates have doubled over the last dozen years, and are expected to increase significantly over the next few years. This talk will focus on how our community can rethink our energy use and implement creative strategies to save energy costs. Find out what it means for our community to be a Quarterfinalist competing for the $5,000,000 Georgetown University Energy Prize.

About Abhilash Kantamneni (‘AH-bee-LAA-sh CAN-tum-NAY-ni’)
Abhi is a PhD student in Computer Science at Michigan Tech. His research uses artificial intelligence and agent based programming to build agile and smart microgrids: power system devices of the future. He graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from Anna University, India in 2008 and obtained a Masters Degree in Physics from Michigan Tech in 2013. Abhi is also the co-founder of iThoughtz.com, a software company in India that now employs 15 full time engineers. Having never seen snow before in his life, he made the unfortunate decision of flying to Houghton in the middle of the winter of 2009. Since then however, he has come to think of the UP as his second home. Abhi is committed to using his education to help the community around him, and strives to be a good ambassador for his family, teachers, culture and country.”

Cosponsored by:
Lake Superior Stewardship Initiative, Michigan Tech Dept. of Social Sciences, Michigan Tech Center for Water & Society, Keweenaw Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, and Keweenaw Land Trust