Category Archives: Students of Kinesiology

Stephanie Dietrich in Undergrad Research Symposium

StephanieDStephanie Dietrich’s research, Subjective and Objective Assessments of Sleep Differences in Male and Female Collegiate Athletes, was presented at Michigan Tech’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium this past week.

With the assistance of Jason Carter, she hypothesized that female athletes would demonstrate improved objective, and worse subjective, assessments of sleep when compared to men.

A number of studies report that sex (i.e., male vs. female) can influence subjective and objective assessments of sleep. Specifically, women tend to report lower subjective sleep quality compared to men, yet objective assessment via actigraphy have shown a paradoxically higher sleep duration and sleep efficiency in women compared to men. The vast majority of work in this area has been limited to middle-age and older adults. Despite the importance of sleep in athletic performance, no studies to date have focused on young, healthy athletes.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


KIP Student Thomas Bye participates in Undergrad Research Symposium

IMG_6206Thomas Bye presented his research, The Effects of Respiratory Muscle Fatigue on Upper-Body Exercise Performance, at the 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

With the assistance of Dr. Steven Elmer, Bye evaluated the effects of respiratory muscle fatigue on upper-body exercise performance. Through his research, we will have a better understanding of the respiratory system, elite sport performance, and exercise prescription for patients with COPD and asthma.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


KIP Student Sydney Smuck participates in Undergrad Research Symposium

unnamedSydney Smuck’s research, Smart Exercise Application with Wearable Motion Sensor: Validity & Usability, was presented at Michigan Tech’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium this past week.

With the assistance of Tejin Yoon, Smuck looked to improve the commitment levels of a home-based exercise program, a smart exercise application with a wearable motion sensor.

The Undergraduate Research Symposium highlights the amazing cutting-edge research being conducted on Michigan Tech’s campus by some of our best and brightest undergraduate students.

The students showcasing their work today have spent a significant portion of the past year working alongside Michigan Tech faculty and graduate students to explore, discover and create new knowledge. They’ve spent long hours in the lab or out in the field designing experiments, gathering data, creating new models and testing hypotheses. They’ve applied their classroom knowledge in new and sometimes unexpected ways, and developed new skills that will propel them forward in their careers.


Michigan Space Grant Consortium Award Recipients Announced

gScmGaeKIP students received awards tallying $10,000 in funding through the Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the 2017-18 funding cycle.

Michigan Tech Undergraduates receiving $2,500 research fellowships:

  • Thomas Bye (KIP): “NASAs Concern for Upper-Body Work Performance During Spaceflight: What Impact Does Respiratory Muscle Fatigue Have?” with Steven Elmer (KIP)
  • Marcello Guadagno (ME-EM): “Stratus Meteorological CubeSat: Payload Integration and Mission Level Design” with Lyon Brad King (ME-EM)

Michigan Tech Graduate Students receiving $5,000 research fellowships:

  • Matthew Kilgas (KIP): “Muscle Function Following Aerobic Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction: Implications for Spaceflight” with Steven Elmer (KIP) and Tejin Yoon (KIP)
  • Kevin Nevorski (Bio Sci): “Nitrogen in Space: An Examination of How Nitrogen Cycle Processes are Related in Streams and How Those Processes are Influenced at Multiple Special Scales” with Amy Marcarelli (Bio Sci)

NASA implemented the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1989 to provide funding for research, education and public outreach in space-related science and technology. The program has 52 university-based consortia in the United States and Puerto Rico.

As an affiliate of the Michigan Consortium, Michigan Tech has been an active participant in MSGC for approximately 20 years. MSGC funding is administered through Michigan Tech’s Pavlis Honors College.

For more information, contact Paige Hackney in the Pavlis Honors College at 7-4371 or visit the MSGC website.


Kilgas and Bye Awarded Michigan Space Grant Consortium Awards

KilgasByeCongratulations to doctoral student Matthew Kilgas and undergraduate student Thomas Bye as both received fellowships for their proposed research through the Michigan Space Grant Consortium (MSGC).  Briefly, MSGC offers research fellowships to students pursuing projects directly related to NASA strategic interests, including aerospace, space science, earth system science, and other related science, engineering or mathematics fields.

Matt will be working with Dr. Elmer  and Dr. Yoon on his project entitled “Muscle Function Following Aerobic Exercise with Blood Flow restriction: Implications for Spaceflight”.

Tom’s project, “NASA’s Concern for Upper-body Work Performance During Space Flight: What Impact Does Respiratory Muscle Fatigue Have?” is the first MSGC award for an undergraduate student in the Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology.  He will be working with Dr. Elmer on his project.

We wish Matt and Tom the best of luck with their respective projects and strongly encourage other students to apply to MSGC in the future.

 


Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology student place at Graduate Research Colloquium

32897145312_f70a45955c_zKIP students Andrew Chapp placed 3rd in the Oral Presentation Competition and Mathew Kilgas placed 1st place in the Poster Presentation Competition at the 2017 Graduate Research Colloquium. Kate Glodowski won a Graduate Student Service Award for her work. Below is a complete list of winners.

The 2017 Graduate Research Colloquium (GRC) was held on February 15-16 in the Memorial Union Ballroom. There were oral and poster presentation. The banquet was held on the evening of February 16

ABC 10’s Keweenaw Bureau Reporter Rick Allen reported on the colloquium. Read more and watch the video at ABC10 UP, by Rick Allen.

Complete list of winners:

Oral Presentation Competition

  1. 1st Place: Kevin Sunderland, Department of Biomedical Engineering
  2. 2nd Place: Teresa Wilson, Department of Physics
  3. 3rd Place: Andrew Chapp, Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
  4. Most Attended: Muraleekrishnan Menon, Department of Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics
  5. Most Attended: Niranjan Miganakallu, Department of Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics

Poster Presentation Competition

  1. 1st Place: Matthew Kilgas, Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
  2. 2nd Place: Brian Page, Department of Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics
  3. 3rd Place: Zichen Qian, Department of Biomedical Engineering
  4. People’s Choice: Mugdha Priyadarshini, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Graduate Student Service Awards

  1. Gorkem Asilioglu, Department of Computer Science
  2. Hossein Tavakoli, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  3. Kate Glodowski, Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
  4. Erin Pischke, Department of Social Sciences

The GRC is held each year by the Graduate Student Government at Michigan Tech.


Randy Owsley Memorial Scholarship Winners Named

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Hali Evans, a participant in Michigan Tech’s Athletic Training Internship Program treats a student-athlete. Evans, an exercise science major, is one of five recipients of the Portage Health Foundation/Randy Owsley Memorial Scholarship.

Five undergraduate students at Michigan Technological University have been selected to receive inaugural Portage Health Foundation/Randy Owsley Memorial Scholarships.

Randy Owsley made an impact that would last a lifetime, in fact, beyond his lifetime. During the 18 years he was the Head Athletic Trainer for Michigan Tech, he worked with a group of student trainers who bonded with him and with each other. Even after Randy left Tech in 1988, he continued to influence them and their careers. That cadre of former student trainers have remained close today.

Owsley died on Thanksgiving morning, 2015. Although his former students are a living legacy of his impact, these former students wanted to establish a lasting tribute here at Michigan Tech. Working in partnership with Portage Health Foundation, these alumni have created and funded the Randy Owsley Memorial – Portage Health Foundation Scholarship. Every dollar the alumni gave, the campus-wide Portage Health Foundation grant matched to help them reach their initial goal of providing five, $1,000 scholarships this year to five student athletic trainers. The long-term goal is to endow the scholarship fund as a lasting tribute to Randy and his influence.

The scholarships are designed to create opportunities for students participating in Michigan Tech’s Athletic Training Internship Program, for those enter health science and engineering professions.

The $500 scholarships, which are renewable for an additional semester, are named after the late Randy Owsley, who spent 18 years as the Huskies’ head athletic trainer and passed away in 2015. Former student athletic trainers who worked with Owsley worked in launching the scholarship as a means of keeping his name associated with Michigan Tech and to show gratitude for the service he provided athletes and life lessons he taught student trainers.

The scholarships were presented at a ceremony this past fall.

This year’s scholarship winners are:

  • Marissa Kinney, Berkley, Michigan, a fourth-year medical laboratory science major now in her second year as a student athletic trainer.
  • Kelsey Saladin, Maple Grove, Minnesota, a third-year exercise science major in her second year as a student athletic trainer.
  • Emily Gilkes, Edgewood, Kentucky, a fourth-year biological sciences/pre-med major in her third year as a student athletic trainer.
  • Sydney Smuck, Traverse City, Michigan, a second-year exercise science major in her second year as a student athletic trainer.
  • Hali Evans, Lake Isabella, California, a third-year (transfer) exercise science major in her second year as a student athletic trainer.

In addition to submitting their resume, applicants were required to submit a 300-word written response or one-to-three minute video response addressing two questions; “How has athletic training internship played a role in health promotion in our local community” and “How has the athletic training internship helped you academically and in the profession that you desire.”

Jason Carter, Professor and Chair of Michigan Tech’s Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology, says he was impressed with the quality of the applicants.

“These are excellent students from multiple majors and I am very pleased they will have a chance to be rewarded for their high levels of engagement with our athletic trainers and our sports teams. They deal with amazing real-world situations that will prepare them well for careers in health care professions,” Carter said.

Read the full story.



Kilgas and Phillips Receive Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Award

Please join me in congratulating doctoral students Matthew Kilgas and Kevin Phillips as both received $3,000 awards for their research through the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation (BCBSM) Student Award Program. Briefly, this foundation is dedicated to improving the health of Michigan residents and supports student research projects across a wide range of human health topics. We wish Matt and Kevin the best of luck with their respective projects and strongly encourage other graduate students to apply in the future.

Matthew Kilgas (Dr. Elmer’s Lab)
Kilgas“Restoring Quadriceps Function Following ACL Reconstruction with Blood Flow Restriction Exercise”

 

 

 

 

Kevin Phillips (Dr. Yoon’s Lab)
Phillips“Muscle Architecture and Muscle Neuromuscular Fatigue in Middle-Aged Obese Adults”


Experimental Biology 2016

The Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology  (KIP) department was represented well at the Experimental Biology (EB) 2016 Conference in April.  Faculty members Dr. Jason Carter, Dr. Qinghui Chen, and Dr. Zhiying Shan along with their graduate students were in attendance and presented posters.

The list of KIP/Biological Sciences graduate students includes; Andrew Chapp (PhD), Ida Fonkoue (PhD), Michael Huber (MS) and Robert Larson (PhD).  Andrew Chapp and Michael Huber were also awarded the 2016 Caroline tum Suden/Frances Hellebrandt Award from the American Physiological Society. KIP Visiting Scholar, Fengli Zhu also had a poster presented by Robert Larson and Dr. Zhiying Shan.

Abstract Title: Intraneuronal Acidification with Acetic Acid, an Ethanol Metabolite, Increases Excitability of Central Nucleus of Amygdala Neurons with Axon Projecting to Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (CeA-RVLM).
Andrew D. Chapp, Kyle M. Driscoll, Zhiying Shan, Jason R. Carter, Qing-Hui Chen

Abstract Title: Acute alcohol consumption blunts the muscle sympathetic nerve activity response to mental stress in humans.
Ida T. Fonkoue, Brett Gervais, Qing-Hui Chen, and Jason R. Carter

Abstract Title: Upregulation of Orexin in the Paraventricular Nucleus Contributes to Salt Sensitive Hypertension
Authors: Michael J. Huber, Fengli Zhu, Robert A. Larson, Ningjun Li, Qing-Hui Chen, and Zhiying Shan

Abstract Title: Diminished Intracellular Calcium in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Augments Neuronal Excitability and Sympathetic Nerve Activity
Robert A. Larson, Andrew D. Chapp, Zixi Cheng, Zhiying Shan, Qing-Hui Chen

Abstract Title: High Salt Challenge Augments Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Contributes to Elevated Neuronal Activity in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus
Authors: Fengli Zhu, Robert A. Larson, Peng Shi, Ningjun Li, Qing-Hui Chen, and Zhiying Shan


Huber EB 2016

Chen,Chapp,Huber,Larson EB 2016

 

 

 

 

EB 2016