Springer Changes to Affect Michigan Tech Users

Springer journals and ebooks are moving to a redesigned Web platform on Monday, November 26, 2012.  The migration is scheduled to occur between 4:00 am and noon EST. While no service interruptions are expected, the change is significant in these ways:

Redirection and Linking:

You should be automatically redirected to the new platform regardless of your starting point:  Husky Fetch services, Google, indexing databases, our Voyager catalog or old Springerlink connections.

My SpringerLink:

Individual accounts from the old SpringerLink will unfortunately not be migrated. Please go to link.springer.com and set up a new profile/account. Be sure to do this while connected to an on-campus computer so that your account is associated with the library’s Springer-licensed books and journals.

Support:

The librarians are pleased to assist you in this transition and to make the most of the Springer publications.  Contact us for assistance

Training:

Springer is offering instructional webinars sessions during the coming months to aid you taking full advantage of features available. You may register for these webinars here: Springer training page.

An extensive FAQ and future training dates can be found here.   If you have any questions or wish to report problems, please contact:  Ask Us!


Nexus: The Scholar and The Library

Dr. Robert R. Johnson speaks on “Romancing the Atom,” Thursday, November 8, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. in the East Reading Room of the Van Pelt and Opie Library.

Johnson will speak on the development and writing of his recently released book, “Romancing the atom: nuclear infatuation from the radium girls to Fukushima.”  The book chronicles over one hundred years of atomic and nuclear development focusing on what he depicts as the human love affair with the atom.

“I’m also looking forward to being a part of a movement to educate people of all ages about the history and current events regarding the atomic age: what we did, what we have left behind, what we’re still doing,” said Johnson. Drawing examples from the uranium dial painters of the early 1900s right up to the recent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, Johnson seeks to engage readers and listeners in deep thinking about the atom, nuclear energy and choice.

More on the book can be found at: www.romancingtheatom.com

Before coming to Michigan Tech, Johnson was a professor at the Miami University, Ohio, where he directed a graduate program.  At Michigan Tech, Johnson served as Chair of Humanities for nine years and has been instrumental in the Reading as Inquiry program for first-year students, now entering its tenth year of operation. He has also consulted with a number of corporations, including Microsoft, Lenscrafters, and General Foods. His published works include articles in virtually every major journal in his respective disciplines and the book User-Centered Technology: A Rhetorical Theory for Computers and Other Mundane Artifacts, won the 1999 Best Book Award in Scientific and Technical Communication from the National Council of Teachers of English.

The event is part of the library’s series “Nexus: the Scholar and the Library” which illuminates ways scholars and scientists productively use libraries and archives. It is open to the public and is sponsored by the Van Pelt and Opie Library. Join us for free refreshments. For further information: (906) 487-2500, library@mtu.edu or www.mtu.edu/library


Archives Recovering from Oct. 26 Fire

The Michigan Tech Archives are recovering from the Oct. 26 fire and ensuing water damage.

Although most of the library is open, the Garden Level of the library and the archives remain closed. Recovery crews are working to restore the area and its documents, with the aim of reopening it to the public.

Additional information is available here.



Join the Tours of the Library

Everyone is invited to tour the library along with Perspectives students, for which the tour is often required. Tours are
available at these times until October 1st:

Sundays: 5:00 p.m.
Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m.

From October 1 through December 14 tours are available:

Tuesdays and Thursdays: 1:00 p.m.


New service enabling students to book study rooms online

As you may know, the library reserves 22 group study rooms for undergraduate and graduate student use—twelve group study rooms (up to 6 occupants), and ten large group study rooms (up to 12 occupants). Students may now book these study rooms themselves through any web browser, smart phone, or web-ready mobile device.

Students may book one or more rooms per day for a total of four hours, and rooms may be reserved up to two weeks in advance. Rooms are equipped with tables and chairs, electrical outlets, wireless internet access, and dry-erase boards. Laptops and dry-erase markers may be checked out at the Library and IT Service Center on the first floor. Rooms 238, 302 and 303 are equipped with large screen, wall-mounted monitors and room 238 is also configured for web-conferencing.

To book your group study room, simply visit the library’s homepage (http://www.mtu.edu/library/) through your computer or mobile device. Click on the big blue button which reads “Need to book a study room?” and follow the simple instructions.


EndNote Workshops in September

The J. Robert Van Pelt and John and Ruanne Opie Library presents a series of EndNote workshops.

EndNote is citation management software which allows anyone to easily collect, organize, and use their research references. Learn how EndNote can save you hours of time in your library research and document preparation process.

Seating for these workshops is limited and registration is required. Send an email to libraryworkshop@mtu.edu letting us know which session(s) you would like to attend. Please include your status (e.g. faculty or graduate student) and your department.

Note: Our sessions use EndNote X5 on PCs. Laptop users are encouraged to update their versions of EndNote prior to the session. See the library’s EndNote Download page.

Upcoming Sessions:

EndNote Basic I: Creating and Organizing an EndNote Library
In this 1 hour workshop participants will learn how to build a collection of citations (i.e. EndNote library) and manage an EndNote library.

September 26th @ 12:00 PM In room 242
September 28th @ 1:00 PM In room 242

EndNote Basic II: Cite While You Write (CWYW)*
In this 30 minute workshop participants will learn how to import specialized output styles.

* Attendance of EndNote Basic I or prior knowledge of building and managing an EndNote library is required.

September 26th @ 1:00 PM In room 242
September 27th @ 2:00 PM In room 242

EndNote Special Topics: Adding Graphics and Setting Preferences **
In this 30 minute workshop participants will learn how to add tables, charts and graphs to your library and include them in your writing process. You will also learn how to set your EndNote preferences to improve performance and learn short cuts.

** Attendance of our EndNote Basics I & II workshops or prior knowledge of creating an EndNote library and using CWYW are required.

September 27th @ 2:30 PM In room 242
September 28th @ 2:00 PM In room 242

We look forward to seeing you at the Van Pelt and Opie Library!


Scott Turner’s Doctoral Hood

It’s been a busy fall semester for the Archives. Nine individual classes have incorporated archival sources into their coursework this semester, which means at least 200 students were regulars in the reading room over the past 15 weeks, studying different aspects of the University’s history, such as broomball, the Pep Band, and the Ford Forestry Center, as well as poring through civic and mining company records in search of documentation on the Quincy Smelter, the lives of copper miners, the history of the St. Mary’s Falls Ship Canal Company.

Although the semester is winding down, we’re still seeing last minute student researchers making a final effort to uncover more content or verify source citation information. (Find help citing archival sources at our web pages http://www.lib.mtu.edu/mtuarchives/citation.aspx.)

In addition to the normal bustle of our well-used reading room, the Archives recently played host to a photo shoot.

UMC photographer works to capture just the right image of recent graduate Dr. Cameron Hartnell.
UMC photographer works to capture just the right image of recent graduate Dr. Cameron Hartnell.

Photographer Calvin Goh (UMC) used the Archives Reading Room as a fitting backdrop for his images of recent graduate, Cameron Hartnell, PhD, Industrial Archaeology. Here, the photographer is captured at his craft:

Cameron’s doctoral research focused on the archaeological remains of the Arctic Coal Company on the island of Spitsbergen, or Svalbard. An earlier Tech grad, Scott Turner, spent six years in the early 20th century working for the ACC at Spitsbergen.

Through his doctoral research, Hartnell became quite familiar with the Scott Turner Collection, housed here at the Michigan Tech Archives. To honor the man whose papers were invaluable to his own research, Hartnell approached the Archives with a unique request: to wear Turner’s doctoral hood in the University’s midwinter commencement ceremonies.

Turner wore this hood when he received an honorary PhD from Michigan Tech in 1932 and it was donated to the Michigan Tech Archives along with corporate records, personal correspondence and other artifacts by Turner’s family following his death. According to Hartnell, the intricate folds and pockets of the graduation hood served a very practical purpose in the past. Students at one time kept a bit of bread or fruit in the pouches so they could continue their studies while they ate.

Doctoral hoods are part of a long academic tradition dating back to the Middle Ages.
Doctoral hoods are part of an academic tradition dating back to the Middle Ages.

The following overview on Turner’s life and accomplishments is excerpted from an article by Erik Nordberg, first published in the Michigan Tech Alumnus, 2002.

Scott Turner began his mining career in a somewhat ordinary manner, completing his BS and Engineer of Mines degrees at the Michigan College of Mines in 1904 at the age of 24.  A native of Lansing, he had completed an associate’s degree at Ann Arbor before taking up the mining trade as his life’s passion.  Yet from these humble Michigan roots, numerous mining jobs and work as an assistant editor for the Mining & Scientific Press took him to the four corners of the globe within the first few years of his career.

In 1926, he received a call from the United States government requesting his service as Director of the Bureau of Mines.  Although an important federal appointment, many noted its added significance under then-Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover, one of the nation’s most prominent mining engineers.  Turner spent eight years at the helm of the BOM, overseeing difficult changes associated with the stock market crash of 1929 and the ensuing onset of the Great Depression.  During this period, Turner returned to Houghton to receive an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree in 1932.  He received similar honorary degrees from the University of Michigan, Colorado School of Mines, and Kenyon College.

A chance meeting with John Longyear in London in 1911 directed a major change in Turner’s career.  The Marquette, Michigan, lumber and mining man was interested in potentially profitable iron and coal deposits in Spitsbergen, an unclaimed arctic island north of Scandinavia.  Turner accepted the position of manager for Longyear’s European interests, an assignment that would keep his attention focused on Spitsbergen for nearly six years.  In addition to a “small fixed annual salary,” he received a bonus of 5% of the company’s net profits.

His work in Spitsbergen was marked by many unusual feats.  The mines proved particularly difficult to develop; only 750 miles below the North Pole, the Arctic Coal Company was the first company to successfully implement modern mining methods at so high a latitude.  In addition, the land was “terra nullius,” meaning that no single nation had ownership of the place.  Through permission of the U.S. government, Turner represented American interests in the region – perhaps the only time that a civilian engineer has been enlisted to maintain American sovereignty overseas.

It was on one of Turner’s many trips across to Spitsbergen that he became a participant in another of history’s infamous incidents.  On May 7, 1915, as it neared the coast of Ireland, a German torpedo struck Turner’s ship, the S.S. Lusitania, just a few decks below the engineer’s cabin.

The mining engineer’s work continued in earnest.  Following his discharge from the hospital, he continued his journey to Scandinavia and arranged for the sale of Longyear’s Spitsbergen properties to Norwegian interests (on his trip from England to Norway, his ship narrowly missed destruction by bombs dropped from raiding German Zeppelins).  Looking to escape the growing European turmoil, Turner headed south, pursuing work in Peru, Chile and Bolivia.  He completed a two-year stint in the Naval Reserves at the tail end of World War I and then spent the next seven years of his life as “Technical Head” for the Mining Corporation of Canada.  This work took him to various parts of that country – as well as China, Mexico, Russia and South America — on exploratory and mine development work.  He often traveled with his new wife, the former Amy Pudden, whom he had married in Lansing in 1919.

Following his departure from the Bureau, he pursued a variety of consulting work.  At one point he was an officer or director of nine mining companies.  He even returned to Spitsbergen to review the progress of mines he developed decades earlier. His life work was capped in 1957 when he received the Hoover Medal, a special honor commemorating civic and humanitarian achievements of engineers.  Recipients are selected by a special board with representatives from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME).

Scott Turner died in July 1972, just one day shy of his 92 birthday.  In his later years, when not hunting or fishing, Turner would talk regularly of his life’s adventures.  But it was his spot on the Lusitania that always singled him out for the most attention.  He responded to endless requests for interviews and completed dozens of questionnaires about the incident.  In the mid-1950s Turner donated the Boddy life belt that had saved his life to the museum at Michigan State University.  It is not clear what became of a cast iron medal he owned, minted in 1915 by the German government to celebrate the sinking of the Lusitania.  The medal had been uncovered during some road construction in Washington, D.C. and had been presented to Turner as a survivor of this historic event.

Left to right, Dr. Jackie Huntoon, dean of the graduate school, Cameron Hartnell, his fiancé Dr. Elizabeth Norris, and Dr. Patrick Martin, Cameron's doctoral advisor and chair of the Social Sciences department.
Left to right, Dr. Jackie Huntoon, dean of the graduate school, Cameron Hartnell, his fiancé Dr. Elizabeth Norris, and Dr. Patrick Martin, Cameron's doctoral advisor and chair of the Social Sciences department.

The staff of the Michigan Tech Archives congratulate Cameron Hartnell on his achievement and are pleased that our collections – both paper and fabric – were such integral parts of his study and graduation.


Archives’ Genealogy Collections

Genealogical holdings of the Michigan Tech Archives were highlighted in a feature article in the November 7, 2009 issue of Houghton’s Daily Mining Gazette.  Here is the article:

Genealogy resources abound in Copper Country
By Garrett Neese, DMG Writer

HOUGHTON – Every year, thousands of people come to the Copper Country to research their heritage.

Fortunately for them, there are many resources available locally to help them with their quest.

Many of the records for which people are looking may be found in county courthouses. Houghton County’s clerk’s office has vital records dating back more than 150 years: births and deaths since 1867 (indexes starting 1893 and 1911, respectively), marriages since 1855 and naturalization records starting in 1848.

Some records are restricted, said Mary Sivonen, senior accounts processor with the county clerk’s office: Only family members may see birth records, while military discharge records may be seen by that person and a spouse.

Because of space and staffing constraints, Sivonen said people should call ahead and set aside a time to come.

“We limit it to just a couple at a time,” she said. “We don’t allow groups to come up because we only have a limited amount of space. The books are very large.”

Coming in to look at open records is free. There are small fees for services beyond that, including $2 for copies and $10 for any records that need to be typed.

The Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections has a wealth of sources, including Upper Peninsula census reports, local newspapers, tax and immigration records, and tract books showing purchases of land from the government.

Assistant archivist Julia Blair didn’t have total visitor numbers, but said hundreds of people come per month to do research.

There are microfilm archives from about 70 local papers, which can include pertinent information such as obituaries. Copies of the Daily Mining Gazette and its predecessor, the Portage Lake Mining Gazette, date back to 1862. There are other papers both major and minor, including three months of 1908 copies of the Hancock newspaper Wage Slave.

Other information includes census records, mine inspector reports of mining accidents, and Calumet & Hecla Mining Co. records, “probably the resource that is most valuable to people who come from outside the area,” Blair said.

The archives have telephone directories from Houghton and Keweenaw counties and Chassell, as well as their forerunner, the Polk directories, which included a list of residents with their job and address (for example, the 1898 Houghton County edition includes Dagenain Frederick, a laborer who lived at 129 Hecla St. in Laurium).

Many people also use Sanborn insurance maps, which shows the layout of streets in the town, as well as the businesses there at that point in time.

“It’s possible to trace a particular family dwelling and see if that home is still there,” she said.

Recently, Blair had a woman call who was interested in what business used to be in a particular building in South Range.

But as with any kind of historical research, Blair said, people should be prepared to put a little time into it.

“We can’t just type in a name, and say ‘Oh, we have this,'” she said.

In the event there’s nothing at the archives, they will also connect them to other resources, Blair said.

“It’s rare that we can’t connect somebody to some records in the past, but it has happened,” she said.

http://www.mininggazette.com/page/content.detail/id/507342.html?nav=5003


Archives Increases Hours

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The Michigan Tech Archives is increasing its hours for public research. Effective Monday, October 5, 2009, the Archives will be open weekdays, Monday-Friday, 10:00am-5:00pm. This increases the total number of hours from 32 to 35 per week, makes the schedule more consistent from day to day, continues lunchtime hours for off-campus users, and will more effectively utilize existing staffing. Responding to input from user focus groups for additional hours, and benchmarking data of other institutions, these extended hours are in line with other archives with similar staffing levels.

Questions or comments may be shared to Erik Nordberg at the Michigan Tech Archives at 906-487-2505 or via e-mail at enordber@mtu.edu