Archives—September 2010

Michigan Tech Kicks Off $200 Million Capital Campaign

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At a campaign kickoff dinner, Mroz also announced two new $1 million gifts, one from Tom Shaffner and the other from John and Ruanne Opie.

John Opie graduated from Michigan Tech in 1961 with a Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. He spent most of his career with General Electric, retiring in 2000 as vice chairman/executive director. He delivered Tech’s commencement address in 1987 and again in 2001, receiving Honorary Doctorates in Engineering and Business.

Opie and his wife, Ruanne, recently donated $1 million for the construction of ten new skybox suites in Michigan Tech’s John MacInnes Student Ice Arena. The new suites, all on the west end of the rink, can accommodate eight to fourteen people each and three skyboxes for larger groups. The Opies previously funded a 54,000-square-foot addition to the library and established an endowment to support the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.


Innovation in Metals Production – Faster, Cheaper, Safer

Wednesday, September 29, 2010 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Room 610, M&M Building

Prof. David Robertson
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Missouri University of Science and Technology
Rolla, MO

Abstract

Metals constitute an important class within the more general category of materialsand steel is by far the most produced of all the metals.  The lecture will giveexamples of how basic scientific knowledge is gained and then used to meet thetechnical challenges and opportunities that arise as we strive to satisfy the everrising demand for metals in a world where sustainability is a vital issue.

Biography

David Robertson is Professor Emeritus at the Missouri University ofScience and Technology.  He was the TMS Extractive Metallurgy Lecturer in 2008and Director of the national Center for Pyrometallurgy (funded by the US Bureauof Mines) from 1985-1996.  Dr. Robertson’s teaching and research interests havecovered the smelting and refining of all the metals – from aluminum through copperand steel to zinc.  He and his colleagues have always worked closely withindustry, both in the US and internationally. The citation for the Elliott LecturerAward reads:  “For application of process modeling to steel refining technology,and for advances in quantitative analysis of metallurgical processes.


Introduction to Pearson’s Crystal Data Software TUTORIAL

Friday, September 17, 2010 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Room 610, M&M Building

Edward A. Laitila
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Michigan Technological University

Abstract

A new software package, Pearson’s Crystal Data, is available to the campuscommunity. The software has been deployed to select areas of the campus.Pearson’s Crystal Data contains a large amount of information on crystallineinorganic materials and would be beneficial to anyone working with solidcrystalline materials. Information in the database includes atomic positions,symmetry data, crystal models, lattice parameters, x-ray diffraction spectra, andmore. An introduction to the software will be provided along with a tutorial of thebasic searching functions. Advanced searches will be introduced as well as thevarious types of data presentation along with tips on how to export importantinformation.

Individuals are welcome to install the software on their laptops and bring it tofollow along the tutorial.


Enterprise of the Week: Advanced Metalworks Enterprise

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The Advanced Metalworks Enterprise (AME) is a collective group of the Innovative Castings Enterprise (ICE) and the Program in Integrated Sustainable Manufacturing Enterprise (PrISM). They joined forces in 2009 to make it easier for students to communicate and complete projects in a more efficient manner. AME gives students the opportunity to work in the machine shop, foundry, and with various specialized microscopes…


Middle School Students Taste the Thrill of Science on the Agassiz

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Frank Best, a 1975 forestry alumnus and middle-school science teacher at Menominee Catholic Central, is bringing two groups of sixth, seventh and eighth grade students to Michigan Tech for a hands-on science experience on Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 13-14. While the students are at Tech, they will also see a MSE demonstration and visit Nara Nature Park as part of a SFRES program.


Channel Saturation and Conductance Quantization in Metal Point Contacts

Friday, September 10, 2010 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Room 610, M&M Building

Harsh Deep Chopra
Laboratory for Quantum Devices, Materials Program
Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department
The University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY

Abstract

Notwithstanding the discreteness of metallic constrictions, it is shown for the first timethat the finite elasticity of stable, single-atom gold constrictions allows for a continuousand reversible change in conductance, thereby enabling direct observation of channelsaturation and conductance quantization. The observed channel saturation andconductance quantization under strain perturbation is achieved by superposition ofatomic/subatomic-scale oscillations on a retracting/approaching gold tip against a goldsubstrate of a scanning probe. Results also show that conductance histograms, whoseuse is considered de rigueur in analysis, are neither suitable for evaluating the stability ofatomic configurations through peak positions or peak height nor appropriate forassessing conductance quantization. A large number of atomic configurations withsimilar conductance values give rise to peaks in the conductance histogram. Thepositions of the peaks and counts at each peak can be varied by changing the conditionsunder which the histograms are made. Histogram counts below 1Go cannot necessarilybe assumed to arise from single-atom constrictions.

Biography

Harsh Deep Chopra (pronounced as ‘Hersh’) is Professor in Mechanical &Aerospace Engineering Department at SUNY-Buffalo, which hosts the Materials Program.Chopra graduated from the University of Maryland’ Materials Department in December 1993.After postdoctoral experience at NIST and Monash University, he joined SUNY-Buffalo inJanuary 1998. Chopra’s primary research interests are focused on single-atom spintronics;mechanics, electronics, and magnetism in atomic sized systems; magnetic functional material(magnetic shape memory alloys, magnetostrictive materials) in thin films, multilayers, and bulkforms; micromagnetic fractals; transport/thermal properties in small systems.


Senior Design vs. Enterprise

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Emily Durham, graduating senior from the materials science and engineering program, felt that the “extended experience” is what she appreciated most about enterprise. “The best way I have come to describe enterprise is an extended senior design project.” Durham will have been a part of the Enterprise program for six semesters once she receives her bachelor’s degree in May. Her experience with the program helped her gain a summer internship with a major company in the metals industry.