Archives—January 2011


Dean’s List Fall 2010

4.0 Students (EMSE)
Bowen, Patrick K
Deane, Kyle J
Lifer, Amberlee S
Michels, Taylor J
Taylor, Lance P

3.50-3.99 Students (EMSE)
Anderson, Kyle W
Biallas, Taylor A
Durham, Emily M
Enz, Peter A
Gelbaugh, Jesse A
Klittich, Mena R
Knudsen, Michel D
Leonard, Samantha L
Magaluk, Travis W
Michael, Kelsey R
Miko, Andrew R
Nigro, Elizabeth A
Operhall, Luke M
Ostrowski, Carol J
Pasionek, Bradley J
Ranck, Helen J
Sahr, Alyssa M
Tianen, Matthew N
Twilley, Mark A
Waterman, Thaddeus W
Waugh, Kelsey P
Wolbeck, Emily C
Wong, Matthew J
Young, Daniel S


Development of an Empirical Model of Rehydration/Rehydroxylation Kinetics for Archaeological Ceramics

Friday, January 21, 2011 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm (1 of 2 speakers)
Room 610, M&M Building

Patrick Bowen
Graduate Student
Materials Science and Engineering
Michigan Technological University

Abstract

Fired-clay ceramic rehydroxylation dating has recently been proposed as a newchronometric dating tool for use on archaeological ceramics.  The technique reliesupon the well-known characteristic of fired clay objects to take up water in a slowmanner, which has been shown to follow a (time)1/4 power law.  Experiments wereconducted in which the mass measurements taken from XIX-century ceramicartifacts revealed a deviation from the (time)1/4 power law over a wide range oftemperatures.  These findings have led to the formation of a general empiricalequation which describes the observed rehydration/rehydroxylation behavior.  This presentation will describe the development of an empirical model describingrehydration/rehydroxylation of ceramic artifacts.  It will also briefly discuss theapproach that can be used to date artifacts using this method, as well as issues ofprecision


A Systematic Investigation of Decomposition of Nano Zn4O(C8H4O4)3 Metal-Organic Framework

Friday, January 21, 2011 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm (1 of 2 speakers)
Room 610, M&M Building

Lei Zhang
Graduate Student
Materials Science and Engineering
Michigan Technological University

Abstract

Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) is a network in the appropriate topology via thecombination of inorganic and organic linker moieties from a wide range ofmultidentate ligands and metals or metal clusters secondary building units. Herein,the systematic investigation of thermal decomposition of the metal-organicframework Zn4O(BDC)4 (MOF-5) was carried out. It was found that thedecomposition of MOF-5, which could take place at 400 °C or above, was due tothe breaking of carboxylic bridges between benzene rings and Zn4O clusters. Thedecomposition produced CO2, benzene, and amorphous carbon besides crystalZnO. Furthermore, the ZnO was covered by amorphous carbon, resulting in theC/ZnO nanoparticles of about 10 nm. The removal of ZnO from the C/ZnOnanoparticles could generate mesoporous carbon with a large surface area of1844 m2/g.Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) is a network in the appropriate topology via thecombination of inorganic and organic linker moieties from a wide range ofmultidentate ligands and metals or metal clusters secondary building units. Herein,the systematic investigation of thermal decomposition of the metal-organicframework Zn4O(BDC)4 (MOF-5) was carried out. It was found that thedecomposition of MOF-5, which could take place at 400 °C or above, was due tothe breaking of carboxylic bridges between benzene rings and Zn4O clusters. Thedecomposition produced CO2, benzene, and amorphous carbon besides crystalZnO. Furthermore, the ZnO was covered by amorphous carbon, resulting in theC/ZnO nanoparticles of about 10 nm. The removal of ZnO from the C/ZnOnanoparticles could generate mesoporous carbon with a large surface area of1844 m2/g.