Category Archives: Students

Engineering Ambassadors Plan Dozens of Local Area Visits for Fall 2017

Engineering Ambassadors KidsThe Michigan Tech Engineering Ambassadors (EA) Program is planning 24 visits to local area schools this semester. The program is designed to change the conversation about engineering, starting with creating excitement for engineering disciplines through outreach activities designed for grades 4-9.

Outreach topics for October and November vary from buoyancy and energy in bouncy balls to structures and chemistry in engineering.

Right now there are 21 ambassadors in EA at Michigan Tech, including 10 veteran ambassadors. The program is open to all of Michigan Tech’s engineering majors, who can join at the start of fall or spring semester. The outreach experience is considered to be professional development for University students, allowing practice with brief presentations and hands on activities with kids.

EA is part of a larger network of universities united under one goal: changing the way people talk about engineering.

Learn more about Engineering Ambassadors at Michigan Tech! Contact the program director Jaclyn Johnson if you are interested in participating.

Engineering Ambassadors Presentation


Challenges at the Frontiers of Mobility Seminar

K. Venkatesh Prasad
K. Venkatesh Prasad

Join us in welcoming Venkatesh Prasad of Ford, who will present on challenges faced at the frontier of mobility and opportunities for education, research, collaboration and career pathways.

The seminar is being held from 3 to 4 p.m. Monday, October 2, 2017, in MUB Ballroom A2.

The title of the presentation is Challenges at the Frontiers of Mobility and Opportunities for Education, Research, Collaboration and Career Pathways.

OpenXC Platform Tutorial Presentation

Join Venkatesh Prasad and Eric Marsman from Ford for a tutorial presentation on the OpenXC Platform from 10 a.m. to noon Monday (Oct. 2) in EERC 501. Bring a laptop.

Ford Motor Company will give a two-hour workshop on the OpenXC capabilities and a tutorial on building an Android application. It will include information on GitHub, Android, iOS, Python and vehicle CAN bus basics. Come see how you can use vehicle data in your class or research projects in order to contribute to the next wave of vehicle technologies.

 



Women in Automotive Engineering at Michigan Tech

Women in Automotive EngineeringMichigan Tech’s Automotive Engineering camp for high school girls strives to address concerns about gender gap in the automotive workforce.

The immersive, week-long program aims to inculcate a strong interest in automotive engineering among pre-college teens to kick-start their dream job in the automotive industry and also help gain a competitive edge for college.

Although the camp is meant only for juniors and seniors, some super motivated 9th graders typically make it to the class each summer.

More than 85% camp goers said they would be interested in an automotive engineering career, according to a post-program survey this summer. That compares to 40% who said they would be interested in such a career before the start of the program. A whopping 95% said they would be interested in pursuing a science career once they completed the camp.

Read more at IndustryWeek, by Gargi Chakrabarty.


Smithsonian on Michigan Tech’s NASA Space Research Institute

Air and Space August 2017Smithsonian’s Air & Space Magazine published a feature article about Michigan Tech’s new NASA Space Research Institute, headed by Greg Odegard (ME-EM). The institute will work on using carbon nanotubes to create a composite that is lighter and stronger than any material used in load-bearing structures today.

Strong Stuff

These students are designing materials tough enough to land on another planet.

The project, called the Institute for Ultra-Strong Composites by Computational Design (US-COMP), is led by Michigan Technological University professor Greg Odegard, who assembled the 11-university team of experts in computational mechanics and materials science. The problem NASA has set for them to solve: Use carbon nanotubes to create a composite that is lighter and stronger than any material used in load-bearing structures today. Odegard says high-powered computers at his university and others are the key to success.

Will Pisani is in his first year of work toward his Ph.D. at Michigan Tech, and he’s already started some of the computational modeling the institute will use.

Using molecular dynamics, Matt Radue, who is just about to receive his Ph.D. from Michigan Tech, has created models to simulate the formation or breakage of chemical bonds between atoms; he calculates, by programming Newton’s laws of motion into the models, the velocities and accelerations of the atoms under different conditions, such as changes in temperature.

Julie Tomasi loves it when the materials in the lab behave the way the computer models predict. Tomasi, also pursuing a Ph.D. at Michigan Tech, has tested the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of epoxy with various embedded fillers, such as graphene (a carbon particle lattice).

Read more at Smithsonian Air & Space, by Linda Shiner.


Nancy Barr Presents at ICCC PCS

Nancy Barr
Nancy Barr

Nancy Barr, director of the MEEM Engineering Communications Program, presented a paper at IEEE’s Professional Communication Society (PCS) annual conference in Madison.

Her paper, titled “Starting from Scratch: Incorporating communication instruction in a revised mechanical engineering curriculum,” described the process used to develop and implement instruction in technical writing and presenting into the four-course mechanical engineering practice sequence.

The IEEE PCS society is dedicated to understanding and promoting effective communication in engineering, scientific and other technical environment.

The conference took place July 23-26, 2017.


Short Course on Diesel Engines July 12-14, 2017

“Fundamentals of Diesel Engines”—MEEM 5202 will be offered next week Wednesday through Friday as a one credit short course.

Course includes extensive laboratory components with a format that mixes traditional lecture and group discussion with hands-on experiments conducted in powertrain test-cells and through driving vehicles on the road. The course will be available to all Michigan Tech faculty/staff, graduate students, and undergraduate seniors.

Course description is included below.

“Fundamentals of Diesel Engines”—MEEM 5202 is a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. Options for transportation and lunch. Content; fundamentals of operation, performance metrics, thermochemistry, combustion, fuel injection and spray, air systems and turbocharging, EGR, energy balance, heat transfer, diesel engine simulation and advanced concepts and trends in diesel engines.

These courses are a great option for anyone looking to increase their understanding of vehicle systems, engines, or for students needing additional credits. The course will be delivered from the Michigan Tech Advanced Power Systems Research Center located near the Houghton County Airport. The course will be 2.5 days in duration, starting at 1 p.m. Wednesday, ending at 5 p.m. Friday of that same week. Transportation to and from campus may be provided each day. Lunch will be provided on Thursday and Friday.

Registration is now open through banweb.

Fundamentals of Diesel Engines, 7/12 through 7/14 CRN 52378.

There are no pre-requisites, but familiarity with thermodynamics and/or IC engine cycles will be helpful.

Contact Chris Morgan cjmorgan@mtu.edu for further details.

By MEEM, APS Labs.


Robotics Machining Workshop for High School Students This Week at Tech

Michigan Tech’s Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics is hosting high school students from Houghton, Calumet and Lake Linden at a Robotics Machining Workshop during the week of June 19, 2017. The students are members of FIRST Robotics Competition teams.

Workshop developers are Marty Toth and Michael Goldsworthy (ME-EM). They will teach the students machining skills and safety practices. During the workshop, the students will machine all the components to construct a working Stirling Engine.

Building a competition robot is a complex undertaking requiring electro-mechanical design, computer modeling, creating machining prints, prototyping and lots of machining.

Michigan Tech connects with FIRST Robotics in many ways. Like many universities, Tech recruits FIRST Robotics high school students with scholarship opportunities. Tech faculty and staff volunteer with the teams during the six-week building season and during the off-season with special projects such as a robot that was created for this year’s Bridgefest Parade, which helped students develop skills for the next building season, which begins early in 2018.

FIRST Robotics


Tech Students Awarded at Noise Control Conferences

NOISE-CON 2017

A total of 14 Michigan Tech students, 13 graduate students and one undergrad, are in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the joint SAE Noise and Vibration Conference and the Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA (NOISE-CON 2017). They are students of Jason Blough (ME-EM) and Andrew Barnard (ME-EM).

On Wednesday, Michigan Tech students won 11 awards between the two conferences:

  • SAE NVC Best Student Paper—First place: Troy Bouman, Second Place: Mahsa Asgarisabet
  • INCE-USA NoiseCon Best Student Paper—Micaela Theiry and Trinoy Dutta
  • INCE-USA Hallberg Foundation Travel Award—Theiry, Miles Penhale, Siddharth Parmar, Suraj Prabhu and Asgarisabet
  • Beranek Gold Medal for Excellence in the Study of Noise Control Engineering for an Undergraduate Student—Stephania Vaglica
  • Beranek Pewter Medal for Excellence in the Study of Noise Control Engineering for a Graduate Student—Asgarisabet

The students also had a booth in the expo where they showed off some of their work and it was busy with visitors for two straight days.

By Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

The event took place on June 12-14, 2017.


ME-EM Senior Recognition Banquet April 20, 2017

The ME-EM Senior Recognition Banquet and Order of the Engineer Program was held on April 20, 2017.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Robin Johnson-Cash, Technical Training Manager, Ford Motor Company. Cash is a 2015 alumna with a PhD in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

WATCH THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS. Closed captioning is available.

Robin Johnson-Cash
Keynote Speaker Robin Johnson-Cash

Spring 2017 Outstanding Student Awards

From time to time we observe exemplary and outstanding performance of an individual or group of individuals in Senior Capstone Design or Enterprise, and when that happens we recognize those students with an Outstanding Student Performance Award.

Isabella Kesler
Isabella Kesler and William Endres

Isabella Kesler, FSAE

Bella joined Formula SAE early in her college career. Bella’s first year on the team marked the beginning of transforming Michigan Tech FSAE from a Monster Garage operation to a race team with a purpose, a plan, and a return to yearly competition. As a new member, Bella learned that building a successful race car requires hard work and dedication. As an FSAE Leader, Bella demonstrated this to her to her teammates. Bella finds out what needs to be accomplished and gets it done. She has a can-do attitude as a team member, SAE Board member, and electrical and controls leader. As President this year, Bella made sure that the team met every competition deliverable on time. Bella was always at the shop working on the cars, preparing competition documents, and occasionally doing homework. Her degrees show mechanical and electrical engineering, but her dedication has been to Formula. Isabella Kesler is the model Outstanding FSAE Member.

Jacob Kendziorski, Erica Huhta
Jacob Kendziorski, Erica Huhta, and William Endres

Erica Huhta and Jacob Kendziorski, SCD 4

Erica and Jake have gone above and beyond within Team 4, which was already a great team to work with as an Advisor. One of the most outstanding qualities of Jake and Erica is their level of professionalism and work ethics. From the first day to the very last one, they have been the driving force and have striven for success and perfection throughout the project. Jake has delivered an outstanding performance and beyond his profound contributions to the team in motion simulation and manufacturing he has shown exceptional leadership skills. Erica, beyond her responsibilities as communication liaison and technical contributions to the team, has kept the team on track and has shown exceptional leadership and professionalism.

Mike Fischer, Lauren Tetzloff
Mike Fischer, Lauren Tetzloff, and William Endres

Mike Fischer and Lauren Tetzloff, SCD 7

Mike Fisher and Lauren Tetzloff have both been exceptional and integral members of Team 7. For both semesters Mike usually ran the meetings, and has been involved with all aspects of the project from brainstorming all the way to testing. In the first semester Lauren did most of the CAD layout and kinematics work. She carried a large part of the work-load and played a key role in every aspect of the project. During the project both Mike and Lauren have been very professional and hard working. The team would not have been as successful without them.

Rachel Pohlod, Cayman Berg-Morales
Rachel Pohlod, Cayman Berg-Morales, and William Endres

Rachel Pohlod and Cayman Berg-Morales, SCD Team 11

As many of you are aware, the ME undergraduate curriculum has undergone a major change recently. That change has challenged students to learn more about implementing modern model-based simulation and analysis tools. This pair of students stood out in taking what they learned in ME Practice, engaging on their own knowledgeable faculty, and taking MotionView far beyond what they had previously learned to simulate sliding, impact, contact and settling (and not tipping over) of gear blanks working their way through the automated handling and inspection system for MacLean-Fogg Component Solutions. For this work, we recognize Rachel Pohlod and Cayman Berg-Morales.

Miller, Tetzloff, Raboin, Johnson
Matthew Miller, Thomas Tetzloff, Kyle Raboin, Dean Thomas Johnson, and William Endres

Thomas Tetzloff, Dean Johnson, and Kyle Raboin and Matt Miller, SCD Team 20

As a team, they did a great job, a fully integrated ME and EE team, and represented MTU extremely well at a national venue in the Air Force Research Labs University Design Challenge. On that team there were a few individuals who really stood out in the spirit of what the Outstanding Student Performance Award is here to recognize. For their extreme dedication from design through prototyping to making it work (more than once), this award goes to MEs Thomas Tetzloff, Dean Johnson, and Kyle Raboin and Electrical and Computer Engineer Matt Miller.

ME-EM Teachers of the Year Award

Radheshyam Tewari
Lecturer Radheshyam Tewari

Radheshyam Tewari is a lecturer in the Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics department at Michigan Technological University since 2014.

Jaclyn Johnson
Lecturer Jaclyn Johnson

Dr. Jaclyn Johnson is a lecturer in the ME-EM department at Michigan Tech, since 2014.

Photo Galleries

View the MEEM Spring 2017 Ceremonies Photo Gallery

View the MEEM Spring 2017 Capstone Senior Design Poster Session Photo Gallery