Category Archives: Michigan Tech News

Merelaniite article Published by Inside-Science

John Jaszczak 2Merelaniite, a new mineral discovered by Michigan Tech professor John Jaszczak, was named Mineral Of the Year for 2016. The mineral was selected by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA). Sergey V. Krivovichev of the IMA says this annual initiative was started in 2014, and “recognizes a single new mineral species published in the previous year as most interesting and outstanding among others.”

Congrats!

 


Yap featured in Research Magazine – Commercialization

Yoke Kin Yap 011320170045Yoke Khin Yap’s research in high-brightness fluorophores earned him a place in Michigan Tech’s Research Magazine in the article “Commercialization“.

“We are expecting a huge impact to the field of flow cytometery…This will mean a lot for cancer and stem cell research.”

High-brightness fluorophores are dyes that fluoresce in different colors and degrees of brightness. They are used in machines called flow cytometers to detect diseased cells in blood.



A New Mineral Named after Physics Professor

In Mineralogical Magazine’s recent newsletter, the International Commission on New Minerals, Nomenclature and Classification announced twelve new minerals that were approved by the commission in November.

Among them is a new bismuth and gold sulfide [Bi3S3][AuS2] from Alsó-Rózsa adit, Nagybörzsöny Mountains, Pest Co., Hungary named jaszczakite, in honor of Michigan Tech professor John Jaszczak (Physics).

The new mineral was proposed by Luca Bindi (Università di Firenze, Italy;) and Werner Paar (Salzburg, Austria).


Cloud in a Box

Cloud Chamber20140324_0003When it comes to climate change, clouds are the wild card. Atmospheric physicists at Michigan Tech use a turbulence-generating cloud chamber to better understand the details and droplets.

There are few absolutes in life, but Will Cantrell says this is one: “Every cloud droplet in Earth’s atmosphere formed on a preexisting aerosol particle.”

And the way those droplets form — with scarce or plentiful aerosol particles — could have serious implications for weather and climate change.

It’s been known for decades that cleaner clouds tend to have bigger cloud droplets. But through research conducted in Michigan Tech’s cloud chamber, which was published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cantrell, graduate student Kamal Kant Chandrakar, Raymond Shaw and colleagues found that cleaner clouds also have a much wider variability in droplet size. So wide, in fact, that some are large enough to be considered drizzle drops.

Dirtier clouds, Shaw explains, not only have smaller droplets, but also much more uniformity in droplet size, with no observable drizzle drops.

“If clouds have more aerosols in them, the drops would be smaller and more similar in size,” Shaw says. “It would be harder for the cloud to rain, and the cloud would then last longer. If a cloud rains, or has less water in it, it won’t be there to reflect sunlight.”

By Stefanie Sidortsova, read the full story.

 


Physics in Michigan Tech News

The Iron Stepping Stones To Better Wearable Tech Without Semiconductors
February 5, 2016
Shaking the Nanomaterials Out: New Method to Purify Water
December 11, 2015
New HOLODEC Study in Science on Using Holography to Better Understand Clouds
October 1, 2015
Michigan Tech Team Helps Clarify the Impacts of Black Carbon in Nature Communications Study
September 30, 2015
A Mousetrap Leads to $2 Million Gift to Physics Department
September 23, 2015
Better Together: Graphene-Nanotube Hybrid Switches
July 31, 2015
Science Helps Students Master Skiing
May 5, 2015
Falling Faster — Researchers Confirm Super-Terminal Raindrops
February 13, 2015
PhD Students Learn to Communicate their Research
February 12, 2015
Flashes from Faster-than-Light Spots May Help Illuminate Astronomical Secrets
January 8, 2015
Physics Chair Elected Fellow of American Physical Society
January 6, 2015
Physics Department Recognized Nationally for Percentage of Women PhDs
October 3, 2014
Michigan Tech Receives NSF Grant for Transmission Electron Microscope
August 26, 2014
A Little Light Magic
July 29, 2014
Three Generations, Seven Graduates, One Family
May 1, 2014