Category Archives: Alumni

Graduate Student Prehoda In the News

image144321-persABC-10 News aired a story, about the potential for using solar energy in the UP, quoting Michigan Tech graduate student Emily Prehoda.

She is working on a survey that will be conducted in L’Anse next fall, a collaborative effort of the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region, the Village of L’Anse, WPPI Energy, and Michigan Tech’s Keweenaw Research Center and Department of Social Sciences.

Residents of the village buy their power from WPPI Energy, a non-profit company.

Prehoda was also featured in USA Today (“The US could prevent a lot of deaths by switching from coal to solar“), and on NBC and CBS with researcher Joshua Pearce (MSE/ECE).

Also in print, Joshua Pearce (MSE/ECE) and social sciences PhD Student Emily Prehoda coauthored, potential lives saved by replacing coal with solar photovoltaic electricity production in the U.S., in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews that can be read here.

 

 


SS Alumnus Publishes on Immigration and Ethnic History

Marc Sanko
Marc Sanko

Marc Sanko (History, 2011) published an essay, “The Worlds of the Immigration Historian” in the Immigration and Ethnic History Society’s new blog on July 1st. The essay was picked as one of ten to run over the course of the year in a competition during December. Sanko, a PhD Candidate at West Virginia University, also had an article, “The Gift of Empire: Exploring the Importance of the Skilled Labor Experience in Maltese Migrants, 1919-1924”, recently accepted for publication in The Michigan Historical Review.

 



Stathi Pappas and Steam Locomotive Heritage

Steam Locomotive For the Love of Steam

In March 2009, Michigan Technological University industrial archaeology alumnus Stathi Pappas purchased the Santa Cruz Portland Cement Company No. 2 Engine and began restoring it in his Mineral, Wash.,, shop.

As true living history, he says, they run them like they ran them, break them like they broke them, fix them like they fixed them, and repeat.

“From an anthropological standpoint, we want to understand that subculture and act accordingly,” Pappas says. “It’s a social movement as well as a professional rebuild.”

Read more at Michigan Tech News, by Dennis Walikainen.


IA Grads in Virgin Islands

IA Grads at Work in USVI

From David Hayes we hear that a number of MTU IA graduates are taking part in a monitoring project in the U.S. Virgin Islands this winter (yes, we here in Houghton are jealous).  In the photo the person on the far right in the maroon shirt is Alicia Valentino (IA ’03) and to her right is David Hayes (IA ’00)  They are working with a large team of archaeologists checking back dirt from an sewer line excavation in Charlotte Amalie on the island of St Thomas on 21 January 2014. This federally-funded project will allow  infrastructure improvement on Main Street, but it runs through a 1500-2000 year old site of the Saladoid people (for more on the ancient Saladoid sites, see this post from the V.I. Daily News last Feb.).  David Hayes  is the principal investigator on this project.



Mary Durfee and MindTrekkers

Parade of Nations
Parade of Nations

As the representatives of some sixty nations were lining up in Hancock for the Parade of Nations, the sun came out and it was starting to warm up.

Nearby, Social Sciences Professor Mary Durfee was gathered with a group of students from Malta. They are attempting to create the first international chapter of MindTrekkers, that fantastic traveling science demonstration that has enthralled school kids around the Midwest and in DC.

Read more at Here, There, and Everywhere in TechAlum Newsletter, by Dennis Walikainen.


Lankton to Present for Hancock Anniversary

FAHC
FAHC

Celebrating 150 years
Events marking Hancock’s sesquicentennial year continue

The celebration for the 150th anniversary of Hancock has included talks and presentations on subjects such migration, influential people and significant events, and the next four months will include a continuation of those concepts.

On Oct. 8, Anderson said local historian Larry Lankton will give a talk at the FAHC (Finlandia’s Finnish American Heritage Center) on Hancock’s contribution to the development of the Portage Lake region.

“We had a lot of industry in the city, too,” he said.

There were saw mills and other industrial businesses, many of which supported the copper mines.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Kurt Hauglie.


Digging for Copper Predates Settlers

Wonderful Power
Wonderful Power

Digging for copper predates European settlers in the Keweenaw by 7,000 years

Susan Martin, retired professor from the Michigan Technological University Department of Social Science, has written a book about the use of copper by ancient people in the Lake Superior region.

She said the title of the book, “Wonderful Power,” was a term used by a 19th century Ojibwa man to describe copper.

Jo Urion, Keweenaw National Historical Park historian, said park officials work with tribal members whenever work is planned on properties that are eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including archeological sites.

Jessica Koski, mining technical assistant for the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, said copper has traditionally been an important part of Ojibway/Anishinaabe people of the Keweenaw, and it still is.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Kurt Hauglie.