Category Archives: New Funding

Lafreniere Co-PI on Grant Tracing Early French Canadian Migration and Settlement Patterns

ljdrc6Don Lafreniere (SS/GLRC) is Co-Pi on a partnership development grant that has received $197,500 from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The project, “Nouveaux regards sur l’occupation du continent nord-am-ricain par la population canadienne-fran-aise 1760-1914,” is tracing the migration and settlement patterns of French-Canadians from Quebec across the North American continent, including the establishment of communities in the Upper Peninsula. This is a two-year project.

From Tech Today.



Lafreniere, Scarlett, Arnold Bring GIS Education and Research to Copper Country High School Students

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Don Lafreniere (SS/GLRC) is the principal investigator on a project that is providing paid GIS internship opportunities to local high school students this summer.  Students are learning geospatial technologies and working with MTU Social Science Researchers and NPS Staff from the Keweenaw National Historical Park to built components of the Keweenaw Time Traveler. The project is supported through a $16,772 contract from the Institute for Geospatial Research and Education/NSF.  Sarah Scarlett (SS) and John Arnold (SS) are Co-PIs on the project entitled  “GRACE (GIS Resources and Applications for Career Education) Project Student Interns.”


John Baeten

John Baeten (Ph.D. candidate, IHA) has received a research grant from the Mining History Association to study the industrial heritage of the Mesabi Iron Range of Northern Minnesota. Baeten’s research project investigates the historic context of low-grade iron ore mining and processing in the Mesabi Range through the lens of industrial heritage and environmental history. His project will consist of  both archival and field research. While in the field he will be conducting a driving and pedestrian survey of the western Mesabi Range, documenting the historical footprints of iron ore “beneficiation” plants that produced both “washed ores” and the more familiar taconite, concentrated iron ore pellets, before shipment to the steel mills of the Great Lakes and beyond. The landscape he is investigating has undergone extensive abandonment and scrapping. This project hopes to connect the stories of direct shipping iron ores to taconite by exploring how the development of washable iron ores in the Mesabi Range helped pave the way for the eventual success of the taconite industry.

 


Robins Awarded Pasold Research Fund Grant

Jonathan Robins

Jonathan Robins has been awarded a grant from the Pasold Research Fund. The grant supports publication of photographs in Robins’ forthcoming book, “Cotton and Race Across the Atlantic,” University of Rochester Press. The Pasold Research fund, a UK-based charity, supports research into the history of textiles.





Schneider receives grants to support his M.S.(I.A.) thesis project

Daniel Schneider at work
Daniel Schneider (MS-IA student) works on a measured drawing of a 19th-century border stamping machine that was used to manufacture wood type for printing decorative borders.

Daniel Schneider, a master’s student in the Industrial Archaeology program has received funding through two grants totaling $2,800 for his master’s thesis project at the Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, WI.  A grant from The Kohler Foundation, Inc. of Wisconsin supports a series of oral history interviews with workers who produced wood printing type in the type shop of the Hamilton Manufacturing Company. Another grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council supports a public archaeology component of Schneider’s thesis research, which involves the experimental operation of an 19th-century stamping machine that produced wood type for printing decorative borders.  These borders would have been used on posters and other large-scale printed matter such as flyers and handbills. He has made a number of trips to the museum to document and rehabilitate the machine, meet with former employees, and use the museum’s archives.  He also attended a Wayzegooze event there last in November where he interacted with leaders in the current wood type printing community.

Schneider will demonstrate the machine’s operation March 10-14, 2015, at Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum. The museum is in Two Rivers, WI, 40 miles southeast of Green Bay, and is the largest museum devoted to wood type printing in the country (and perhaps the world).  He is also in charge of the letterpress studio at the Copper Country Community Arts Center in Hancock, MI.