Tag Archives: WorkLife Quality

Financial Wellness Lunch and Learn

 

WorkLife Connection offers the third Financial Wellness Lunch and Learn from noon to 1:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 28 in MUB Alumni Lounge A. Chris Riesgraf, Financial Advisor at Edward Jones, will discuss strategies to “Bring Balance to Your Budget.”

Learn about the basics of budgeting, how to sharpen your spending and savings strategy, and the importance of credit and debt. If you are saving for college, planning for retirement, or have any investment goals in mind, you’ll find this Lunch and Learn very informative and helpful to reaching your goals.

Feel free to bring your lunch; beverages will be provided.


Welcome to our New WorkLife Intern!

We recently welcomed our new WorkLife Connections Intern, Morgan Laajala, to our team. Please read on to get to know her a bit better. We are looking forward to her working with us and helping to build WorkLife Connections programs here at Michigan Tech!


Hi everyone! My name is Morgan and I’m the new intern for the WorkLife Connections Program. I have been working to help organize events, researching other university’s work life programs, and building awareness to the program by setting up social media pages.

I am a second yemlaajalaar business marketing student at Michigan Tech. There was never a question about what university I wanted to attend, as it was always this one. My mom and two sisters graduated from here, and I couldn’t wait to follow in their footsteps. While my classmates were researching and choosing colleges during our senior year, I was confident in my choice and I have not regretted it. I’ve been enjoying my classes so far and I’m excited to continue learning more. I’m not quite sure what I plan to do with my degree yet, but I have at least two more years to figure that out. All I know is that I hope it allows me to travel. During my time here, I would love to study abroad for a semester.

Speaking of travel, I got to do some this summer when my best friends and I took a ten-day road trip out east. We visited New York City for the first time, wandered around Washington, D.C., swam in the Atlantic Ocean, hiked Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina, white water rafted in Tennessee, stayed in a cabin high in the Smoky Mountains, and finished off our trip in Nashville. I have always wanted to travel, and after that trip, I only wanted to see more beautiful places! I am so lucky to have these crazy friends that are always up for every new adventure. When I’m not dreaming about my next travel destination, I enjoy meeting new people and trying new things, painting, writing, and spending time with friends and family.

I am excited to be a part of this important program at Michigan Tech. I have been researching other universities such as Yale University, Michigan State University, and Brown University. There are many different dimensions that come with a Work Life program, and I am gaining knowledge on what those are. I hope I can be useful in helping the WorkLife Connections program meet its goals to help Michigan Tech’s faculty, staff, and students balance their work and home lives.


An Invitation to Staff to Join Michigan Tech’s Pilot Staff Mentoring Program

The Staff Mentoring Program Committee invites all university staff interested in working with a trained mentor to fill in the Mentoring Interest Form. Forms must be submitted by August 15, 2016 to be considered for participation. Click HERE to fill out the Mentoring Interest Form.

In 2015, Michigan Tech received a grant from the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) to develop a staff mentoring program, designed to train mentors here on campus who would like to work with their colleagues to assist with things like:

  • Finding ways to more effectively blend work and home life demands
  • Developing job skills to assist with career growth and advancement
  • Learning about the University and opportunities to become more involved
  • Improving professionalism and communication skills
  • Finding opportunities to network and meet people from other departments
  • Addressing challenging workplace situations
  • Learning more about University resources and benefits

Seventeen mentors have recently completed their training; about two-thirds of these trained mentors are members of the AFSCME and UAW unions. The overall goal of the Staff Mentoring Program is to provide staff with an opportunity to work with a trusted colleague to help with career growth and development here at Michigan Tech.

Questions? EMail worklife@mtu.edu or call Ann Kitalong-Will, Staff Mentoring Program Committee Chair, at 7-1809. See also the 2016 Staff Mentor List.


Don’t Let the Water get Stagnant: Tips for a Learning Organization

By Amelia Newman

We are an output society. Education has taught us this. From the time we start college, for instance, we push out assignments. One after another, just to get it done, whether we truly understand what we’re doing or not. A common phrase in the scholastic world is, “I’m good at BS-ing.”

So we morph to fit into a society that’s more about the doing than about the understanding. And so do our organizations. At some point many of us shut our brains down and are no longer learning new things, but rather going off of what we already know.

Therefore the question is raised: how do we mix up the stagnant water? How do we keep moving toward a culture of learning organizations? Here are a few tips that any one of us can either initiate or start practicing to help keep our schools and work environments moving in a healthy direction.

Tip 101:

Be question-friendly. Show that you can both be asked a question and can answer one for someone too. This is huge. Many people either in school or in the  workplace get stumped on something with a simple solution all because they are afraid to ask a question. We’re afraid to appear dumb in a smarter and smarter world. So laugh a little about your mistakes, and in the process say what you’ve learned. This will help a shy person feel that you are approachable and they may come and ask you a question.  Maybe there are even some things you’ve thought you should ask your boss recently, but then you told yourself,”No, I’ll just figure it out.” Well, why not go ahead and ask?

Tip 102:

Out with the old, in with the new. Talking about what’s new, trying out new fads, new technologies, and new health options can really help make the workplace more exciting. When a work culture is too sedentary, it does not encourage learning and change within the organization. But showing a co-worker how you utilize your android phone for organizing and planning, sharing how your new version of software has really improved your job, or how your new desk chair has really improved your back posture, can help your organization overall to stay up to date.

Tip 103:

Read books related to what you do. One can always improve and learn more. Have some fun with this and don’t treat it like a college textbook that you want to avoid. There are many good, creative books out there with tips for a healthy workplace, and you are a big part of what gives your organization its own culture.

Tip 104:

Inspiration is key. This is fundamental for other things such as a creativity, innovation, invention, etc., so do what it takes to stay inspired. Maybe it’s certain people in your life that inspire you, a nature photography hobby you do on the side, or traveling to a place you’ve never been. Whatever it is, take some time between your work and personal life to stay inspired.

Tip 105:

Take a break to recharge. This goes along with focusing on your breathing, especially when you’re stressed out. It also means taking care of you. If you’re like me, stress takes a huge toll on you mentally and physically. I find that when I’m especially stressed out, I’m sitting there not breathing well and not really learning anything in class or at work. If I try to work on something I have to do, I can’t focus. So I have to stop and recharge with something relaxing, in order to re-feed the brain.

We are real people with real lives who need to make real decisions that have important things at stake. We are not computers, simply calculating and functioning—though sometimes we may feel like it. Whatever the case, we all need to stop a little and recharge, taking a little thought for what we are doing.


WorkLife Annual Survey Still Open

We in the WorkLife Advisory Committee appreciate the feedback you have provided to us thus far regarding your concerns and challenges when it comes to work-life integration.

Our first annual survey remains open, and will be open until December 28, 2015. This survey asks for information relating to challenges you face between work-related demands and home-life responsibilities, childcare needs, adult-care needs, and self-care needs. We also ask about what areas of work-life blending you would be most interested in or find most helpful.

Please help us out by taking about 10-15 minutes to provide your feedback. Click here to take the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/worklife_connections .

All answers are completely anonymous.

Our goal in the New Year is to develop new programs for you, based on the data provided through the survey.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at worklife@mtu.edu . If you are interested in serving on the committee, please email us as well.

Thank you for your help.


First Annual WorkLife Quality Survey is Open

The WorkLife Advisory Committee invites you to take the first annual WorkLife Quality Assessment Survey by clicking here. (URL: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/worklife_connections)

This survey will provide baseline data to help identify the services that are most needed to support work-life blending, as well as to assess the quality of work-life blending that all of us in the Michigan Tech community experience. All responses to the survey are completely anonymous. The report for the survey will be made available on the WorkLife website.

Your feedback is important as it allows us to address topics of importance and provide resources and services that are valuable to the campus community. The WorkLife Advisory Committee appreciates your assistance.


Laugh in the Face of Adversity: Maintaining a Sense of Humor in the Workplace

Humans are social creatures and humor is one of the greatest interactions we have that connects us to one another. We laugh in countless situations in countless settings, from family dinners to friendly get togethers. Even when first meeting someone, a well placed and proper joke does wonders in breaking the ice and paving the way to more casual interaction. Humor is fun, easy, usually free, and makes us feel comfortable being around each other in everyday social settings—something that is often overlooked in the workplace.

The workplace: “no pain, no gain;” “work isn’t supposed to be fun;” “work before play;” “no rest for the weary.” These are phrases often used when discussing our work and career. We seem to be under the impression that we should not be having fun at our jobs, which is where we spend much of our time. Plus, work can be frustrating: your boss piles you with files, forms, and impossible due dates; you ran into a co-worker and dropped your lunch; you’re tired and your patience is frayed. It’s no wonder we feel so stressed out and frazzled by the end of the week—nay, day—we typically have more things to complain about than rave about when we are asked about our days at work. This is a serious health problem that can be alleviated by a simple change in attitude to allow ourselves to make our jobs more enjoyable. In other words: Be funny; it may improve your health!

Studies have shown that laughter really is medicinal. In fact, laughing is similar to exercising in that it works your core muscles and stimulates the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. When you have a good, hearty chuckle, your body increases endorphin levels and reduces stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. Subsequently, your body’s stress responses diminish: blood pressure lowers, muscles relax, and mood improves. Not only will you feel refreshed after a good giggle fit with your colleagues, but that shared chuckle over the ridiculous demands of your job and home lives also helps your immune system stay active.

 

What can you do to build a sense of humor in the workplace?

  1. Start with a smile (even if it’s a fake one)—“Fake it ‘til you make it,” as the old adage goes, and it goes for a reason. A conscious smile can go a long way to make it easier for a real smile to creep onto that face of yours.
  2. Take a step back and look for what’s ridiculous—It can be easy to feel overwhelmed when you’re in the middle of a project. Try to look at your situation from an observer’s perspective, and you may find it easier to recognize some of the absurdity of what you’re doing. It might even help to think about your life as a sitcom. In other words, sometimes the important things we do can give us a good chuckle.
  3. Take short breaks—Make time to read your favorite webcomics or watch short, funny videos. Use these breaks as rewards for getting things done and you may see improvement in how you feel by the end of the day.
  4. Make sure your friends and co-workers are on board—You may need to be the one who initiates the humor in your workplace, so make it a point to start days off by sharing a video you found that cracked you up or by telling your colleagues about something hilariously stupid that happened to you the other day.

 

Now, get out there and use that humor of yours to laugh at all these lemons life inexplicably puts in your pockets.

 


Instructors – please join us for Coffee Chat

Today’s teaching methods and tools enable communication with students from virtually any place at any time. Instructors often struggle to achieve a work-life balance that enables them to teach in an increasingly connected environment and still have time for family and personal interests. The WorkLife Programming Advisory Committee and the William G. Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning will co-host this coffee chat to explore tips and techniques for balancing the many demands placed on today’s instructors. We’ll also brainstorm other possible solutions, such as workplace flexibility and resources, that the WorkLife Programming Advisory Committee can advocate to help instructors balance their roles.

This coffee chat event is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 26 from 3:30–4:30 p.m. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided to those who register by Monday, February 23. Click here to register.