Archives—May 2019

Gagnon, Huntoon, and Zhao Recognized as Notable Women in STEM

Three Michigan Tech women are among the “Notable Women in Stem” named by Crain’s Detroit Business editors.

Valoree Gagnon, Director of University-Indigenous Community Partnerships, Great Lakes Research Center

Jacqueline Huntoon, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Feng Zhao, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering

According to Crain’s (5/28/2019): The women featured in this Notable Women in STEM report were selected by a team of Crain’s Detroit Business editors based on their career accomplishments, track record of success in the field, contributions to their community and mentorship of others, as outlined in a detailed nomination form.

Congratulations for this well-deserved recognition!

See: https://www.crainsdetroit.com/awards/notable-women-stem?utm_source=crain-s-special-report&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190528&utm_content=article1-readmore


What Does a Scientist Look Like?

Close your eyes and visualize a scientist. What do you see? Do you picture a male? A female? Is your scientist in a lab coat and surrounded by chemicals and fancy equipment? Perhaps your scientist is in waders or measuring a tree. Our perspective on who or what makes a scientist may vary based on our experiences, our background, or perhaps our culture. What is important however, is that we realize that science, in order to be at it’s best, must be inclusive. We must have scientists from a variety of backgrounds because our individual life experiences  shape our perspective and unique perspectives are what lead to breakthroughs.

Just this morning, the ADVANCE team found an article in Science magazine referencing an article about how children perceive scientists. In the article, a group of scholars analyzed 5 decades of “draw-a-scientist” studies conducted on school aged children. They found that students depict scientists as female 34% of the time as of 2016, up from 1% in the 1960s and 1970s. A breakdown by gender found that female students are now depicting female scientists nearly 50% of the time, again, up from 1% in the 1960s and 1970s. These numbers are encouraging but still highlight the need for increased education on what makes a scientist so that our children realize anyone can be a scientist.

Want to learn more?

Visit this link for the article from Science.

 

For a more in-depth look, the study from Child Development can be found here.


2019 University and Distinguished Professors Announced

The Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs announces this year’s University Professors and Distinguished Professors recognizing outstanding faculty.

The Distinguished Professor title recognizes outstanding faculty members who have made substantial contributions to the University as well as their discipline but are not presently recognized through an endowed position or faculty fellowship. Distinguished Professors will not exceed 10% of the number of tenured and tenure-track faculty in a specific college or school at any time. Recipients selected this year as Distinguished Professors are: Dr. Jennifer Slack, Professor, Department of Humanities; Dr. John Vucetich, Professor, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science; and Dr. Zhanping You, Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 

The University Professor title recognizes faculty members who have made outstanding scholarly contributions to the University and their discipline over a substantial period of time. University Professors will not exceed 2% of the total number of tenured and tenure-track faculty at Michigan Tech. This year, two professors have been awarded the title of University Professors. Dr. Kathleen Halvorsen, Professor of Natural Resource Policy in the Department of Social Sciences and Dr. Timothy Schulz, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

The confidential process for selecting recipients spans the academic year and recipients for each award are notified in mid-May. Additional details regarding the award and selection procedures can be found on the provost’s website.


PhD GRA Funding Available-ADVANCE Initiative

The ADVANCE Initiative at Michigan Tech is seeking a PhD student to participate in and conduct research on faculty gender and career issues including diversity, equity, and inclusion. Research would be primarily focused on STEM disciplines but may also be expanded to other disciplines. Up to three years of support for tuition and stipend are available (including summer semesters) through this Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) position.

The ideal candidate is either an incoming PhD student with a Master’s degree or a current PhD student in their first or second year. Students may pursue any of Michigan Tech’s PhD degree programs but should have or be willing to take courses in survey methods and quantitative analysis. The research done under the ADVANCE programs will ideally form the core (or a substantial portion) of the student’s dissertation. Familiarity with current diversity and inclusion research in STEM is advantageous but not required.

To apply, please submit:

  1. A cover letter indicating your current academic level
  2. A CV
  3. A statement of interest regarding diversity and inclusion in STEM to Prof. Adrienne Minerick.

A multidisciplinary team of faculty will be reviewing application materials, so please try to minimize technical, discipline-specific jargon. The start date for this position is as soon as possible but no later than August 19, 2019.