Category: BIPOC

Juneteenth Tweet Summary

1. In honor of our country’s newest national holiday, Juneteenth, ADVANCE at Michigan Tech will be sharing a new resource each hour (approximately) on Black culture and systemic racism in academia. The complete list will be posted on our blog ADVANCE Newsblog – MTU Blog site for the ADVANCE initiative

2. The BARC (Building an Anti-Racist Classroom) Collective has a Suggested Reading List (https://barcworkshop.org/resources/recommended-reading/…) featuring classics and contemporary work on racism, anti-racism, and decolonizing the academy. Also foster Principled Space in classrooms.

Principled Space

The BARC collective begins each session with a ground-clearing practice that sets a levelled foundation upon which to build our work and relations in the workshop space. Artist and activist Hanalei…

barcworkshop.org

3. See past @AWIS program with Dr. Malika Grayson, author of Hooded: A Black Girl’s Guide to the Ph.D., for a conversation about surviving and thriving in STEM despite experiencing Imposter Syndrome and other challenges.

Whats Next Webinars – AWIS

awis.org

4. Experiences in science are varied. For a perspective that will change the way you think, read Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein’s (54th Black American woman Ph.D. in physics) (http://cprescodweinstein.com/my-origin-story) book, The Disordered Cosmos (https://boldtypebooks.com/titles/chanda-prescod-weinstein/the-disordered-cosmos/9781541724709/… ). #DisorderedCosmos

The Disordered Cosmos

From a star theoretical physicist, a journey into the world of particle physics and the cosmos — and a call for a more just practice of science. In The…

boldtypebooks.com

5. A community group is reading the book, “The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together” by Heather McGhee. Author interview podcast on NPR helps summarize discriminatory laws and practices that negatively impact society.

‘Sum Of Us’ Examines The Hidden Cost Of Racism — For Everyone

Author Heather McGhee draws on a wealth of economic data to make the case that discriminatory laws and practices that target African Americans also negatively impact society at large.

npr.org

5. Sabrina Nawaz’s in Forbes: “Commit To Inclusion: Establish Anti-Racist Team Norms” 95% of senior managers are white and establish comfy – to them – team norms. Alternatives enable understanding of BIPOC faculty experiences to better position for success

Commit To Inclusion: Establish Anti-Racist Team Norms

If you are looking to get the most out of a diverse team, don’t go it alone. Enlist the help of your team to create inclusive norms that allow everyone to make an ordinary day yield extraordinary…

forbes.com

6. POCSquared offers a blog and podcast dedicated to “putting people of color into the equation” in STEM fields.

Putting People of Colour Into The Equation

poc2.co.uk

7. Great read to learn and understand the difficulties Black scientists continue to face when seeking funding for their research. #fundblackscientist @Lola_UMich @kellystevenslab @KristynMasters @dr_princess @drkahaynes

https://cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674(21)00011-8.pdf
8. Concluding tribute to our newest national holiday, Juneteenth. Let’s support communities & elevate excellence of Black scientist @BlkInEngineering @BlackInBME @BlackInChem @BlackInBiophys @BlackInRobotics @BlackInCardio @BlkInComputing @BlackInCancer @BlackinNanotech @BlackInMath


ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: When question-asking becomes harassing

In certain fields, women dread presenting seminars because of the aggressive questioning they experience. This type of questioning goes well beyond questions that arise from intellectual curiosity about a topic. Patronizing and hostile questioning is a type of harassment. This New York Times article describes a study published in the National Bureau of Economic Research illustrating that women and minorities giving seminars at conferences often experience a form of biased questioning that can harm their career progress and stifle the diversity of ideas found in the field.


If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


ADVANCE Weekly Roundup: Programs to Diversify Role Models in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Medicine)

An engineer friend once told my wife that my daughter, who was considering majors in college, was not the right type to be an engineer. Too often, we develop preconceived ideas of what a scientist, engineer, or artist is expected to look like. We use such stereotypes to simplify the complex world around us. This practice becomes harmful when it projects narrow preconceived expectations on others. Teachers and professors who consciously or unconsciously expect different competencies from different genders or races not only constrain their own ability to think creatively and originally in the classroom but they do real harm to the ambitions of students.

Today’s Weekly Roundup focuses on two articles from Science that describe programs that work to widen our expectations and images of what a professional in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine) looks like. And for my engineering friend and the record, my daughter earned a computer engineering degree from the University of Michigan and is in the last year of her PhD in computer science at MIT.  

The first article, “Women innovators become STEM ambassadors for girls,” describes an AAAS program called IF/THEN. It focuses on ambassadors who are selected to become high-profile role models for middle-school girls. One goal is to break down narrow exclusionary ideas of what a scientist or engineer looks like and does. When we show that engineers can be dancers and artists and that scientists can be poets and athletes, we allow young people to see greater opportunity for themselves in STEMM.

The second article describes the contributions of Shirley Malcom who has led the Sea (STEMM Equity Achievement) Change Program, which is supported by AAAS and helps academic institutions identify how they can better serve diverse students and faculty. Sea Change grew out of the 2005 Athena SWAN Charter which was developed to promote greater participation of women in science in the United Kingdom. Malcom adapted and broadened this program to include other underrepresented groups.

Today’s feature was shared with us by David Flaspohler. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


Equal Pay Day 2021 Marks Progress, Challenges

by Faith Morrison, Tech Today, March 23, 2021

Women earn less than men do, on average. This difference, the gender wage gap, is approximately 18 % across all workers. The gap is even larger for women of color.

The problem is present even just one year from graduation. Just one year from college graduation, women make seven percent less than men, even after accounting for college major, occupation, economic sector, hours worked, marital status, GPA, type of undergraduate institution, institutional selectivity, age, geographic region and months unemployed since graduation (“The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap, AAUW, 2018).

Tomorrow (March 24) is Equal Pay Day (averaged for all women), a day that symbolizes the extra days women must work to catch up to what the average man earned the previous year. In 2020 Equal Pay Day was March 31, and in 2019 it was April 2, indicating that incremental progress is occurring.

Red is worn on this day as a symbol of how far women and minorities are “in the red.” Join the Copper Country League of Women Voters and other supporters for a “Red Out” to recognize Equal Pay Day.

Due to COVID-19 considerations, our usual cookies and literature event will not take place this year. We can all safely wear red, however.

Find out what you can do to help close the gap.


March 12, 2021 Weekly Roundup: 8 Practical, Sustainable Steps to a Diverse Faculty

A strategic and sustainable approach to realizing a more diverse faculty is both overdue and critical to the future of higher education. Two university deans offer timely advice for enacting such an approach. They recommend introducing BIPOC faculty to the university’s unique features and facilities through invited presentations, postdocs, or conferences in order to create positive impressions and connections even before a hire is possible. Proactive recruitment beyond the “post and hope” method is necessary but takes care and both individual and collective effort. Apart from the start-up package, robust systems of support for faculty development should be available, utilized, and affirmed by academic leaders. Such strategies are “neither mysterious nor terrifically expensive.”

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.
The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


March 5, 2021 Weekly Roundup: Focus on culture to overcome imposter syndrome

Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features an article from Harvard Business Review on ways an organization can support individuals to reduce imposter syndrome. Imposter syndrome, coined in 1978, describes the feeling of doubting one’s abilities, second guessing one’s accomplishments, and having mild-anxiety about work success. Imposter syndrome places the blame for feeling this way on the individual rather than considering how the organization’s historical and cultural context sends signals to women, particularly women of color, about their professional contributions. Rather than seeking to correct the individual, the answer lies in creating organizations that position racial, ethnic, and gender diversity as the norm. Addressing systemic bias and toxic cultures can reduce experiences that lead to imposter syndrome and maximize the net productivity of all members of the community.

Today’s feature was shared with us by the Advocates and Allies Advisory Board. If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


January 15, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Did you know that only one federal holiday has been designated as a national day of service? That holiday, Martin Luther King Jr Day, is coming up on Monday (Jan. 18) and in observance of Dr. King’s legacy, we’ve dedicated this week’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup to highlighting resources for community service, racial justice, and equality. Please join ADVANCE at Michigan Tech and our partners in educating your colleagues while redoubling efforts to build a diverse, equitable, and intentionally inclusive campus community.

National Day of Service

Resources For an Equitable and Inclusive Community

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


January 8, 2021 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Much as our lived experiences are influenced by the intersections of our identities, so too are our perceptions of diversity and inclusion. Recent research from the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) at Harvard University indicates that white faculty members often have a vastly different perception of diversity and inclusion than their non-white counterparts. Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup highlights a recent analysis from COACHE on this difference as well as the idea of faculty “fit” and how we can improve our narratives to progress toward equity on our campus.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


December 4, 2020 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Are you ready to be an ally for equity in higher education? Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup features an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education focusing on ways Black academics believe their white colleagues can better support them within their units and across campus. Use today’s resources as a launchpad but be sure to simultaneously have regular conversations with underrepresented individuals to ensure your allyship is best positioned as an effective partnership.

For example, while we all know that hard work is requisite for success in academia, not everyone recognizes that underrepresented minorities often face an even heavier work burden in order to be successful. As a double whammy, perceptions of the value of contributions are not equitable either. Simply confronting these inequities is one place where allyship can be critical.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.


November 13, 2020 ADVANCE Weekly Roundup

Future faculty are the students at colleges and universities today. The bias in selection for success changes the demographics of potential faculty. The student debt crisis in the United States continues to rise to unprecedented levels with total student debt totalling in excess of $1.5 trillion. The burden of borrowing to finance higher education is not equitably distributed. Today’s edition of the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup focuses on the impacts of “Borrowing While Black” and the factors that exacerbate the student debt crisis for Black Students. An emphasis on addressing this crisis can ensure that the benefits of college are more equitably distributed including that future faculty will be more diverse.

If you have an article you think we should feature, please email it to advance-mtu@mtu.edu and we will consider adding it to the ADVANCE Weekly Roundup.

The ADVANCE Weekly Roundup is brought to you by ADVANCE at Michigan Tech, which is an NSF-funded initiative dedicated to improving faculty career success, retention, diversity, equity, and inclusion. These articles are available on the ADVANCE Newsblog (https://blogs.mtu.edu/advance/). To learn more about this week’s topic, our mission, programming efforts, and to check out our growing collection of resources, contact us at (advance-mtu@mtu.edu) or visit our website: www.mtu.edu/advance.