Archives—February 2018

Winter Safety Tips

Mittens VS. Gloves

Gloves may look fashionable but using mittens are much more safe. When your fingers are able to touch each other inside mittens, they generate more body heat than when they’re inside gloves.

Warm up Before Shoveling

Before you shovel all the snow and ice outside of your home or workplace, do some stretching exercises first. Alternatively, marching in place or walking for a couple of minutes will warm up your muscles, allowing you to work more efficiently and reduce the risk of injuring yourself.

Michigan Tech from Mont RipleyRock salt + Kitty Litter = Safer walkways

Have some rock salt and kitty litter or sand on hand. Rock salt helps melt the ice on slippery surfaces. Kitty litter and sand gives temporary traction.

Warm up Before Driving Off

Just like stretching exercises before working outside prevents injury to you, warming up your vehicle prevents damage to your car, too. This also helps reduce the moisture condensation on the inside of your car windows. Remember, though, not to warm up your vehicle in a closed garage.

Report those Damaged Lines!

After a winter storm, immediately report any downed power lines or broken gas lines in your area or workplace.


OIS Donates to LeaderShape®

The Office of Information Services (OIS) donated one full scholarship that allowed a student to participate in the LeaderShape® Institute.

The LeaderShape® Institute is an intensive week-long leadership development experience that is designed to help young leaders learn to “lead with integrity.”  This highly interactive program provides the tools for individuals to:

  • Act consistently with core ethical values, personal values, and convictions
  • Develop and enrich relationships
  • Respect the dignity and contribution of all people
  • Believe in a healthy disregard for the impossible
  • Produce extraordinary results

The LeaderShape® Institute uses interactive program methods rather than classroom lectures—everyone is a teacher and everyone is a learner. At the LeaderShape® Institute, participants create a LeaderShape® Breakthrough Blueprint they can begin to implement as soon as they leave. The objective of each participant’s blueprint is to produce extraordinary results in their organization and their institution during the next nine to 12 months.

The Michigan Tech LeaderShape® Institute continues to be very popular after almost a 20 years at the university.

OIS is proud to have contributed to an organization that instills leadership abilities into young people. OIS staff members believe in leadership by relationship building and collaboration and are pleased that a long-running institute provides this training on the Michigan Tech campus.

Screen Shot of the LeaderShape Promotional Video
Screen Shot of the LeaderShape Promotional Video

Find a video of participants and more information about by the institute at the LeaderShape® website. http://www.mtu.edu/student-activities/leadership/leadershape/


First Friday Social Event Management Kaizen

Auxiliaries Services facilitated a Lean event to apply a Plan, Do, Check, Act cycle to the way departments within Michigan Tech coordinate events, specifically, the First Friday Socials that many departments have participated in over the years.
Picture of Blizzard T. Husky with a fan at the Skybox Social.
Picture of Blizzard T. Husky with a fan at the Skybox Social.
Before the Continuous Improvement team applied Lean thinking to the event management process, they found that different departments were hosting similar events with unique needs. The hosting departments had to secure the services they needed to execute their event using multiple on and off campus resources. The team also found that some departments are experienced with planning events while others have little to no experience.
The team’s target state for after the event is to establish a one-stop shop for the customer to contact for all event needs. The problem the team had to tackle was the lack of a centralized location for departments to contact to gain all of the services they need to host a First Friday Social.
To solve this problem and find waste and root causes the team created a process map. This showed the breakdown of what the customer was required to do and what the MUB and Dining Services had been helping with. They brought in outside eyes and assembled a team from multiple departments on campus. After this exercise, they noticed that the customer had an excess of responsibilities and there was a gap where an Event Management Team could help to streamline and error proof the planning the process.
The team decided to breakdown the event planning process into a timeline and then a flow chart and a corresponding checklist to provide at the initial event planning meetings. This helps the customer to see what items are their responsibility and what items the team is available to help with.
The improvement team also created a walk through check list to make sure that the proposed event space is appropriate and that all needs will be met for the event. The walk through check list is still being developed and improved as the team gains experience meeting with customers at the site of the event.
Finally, in an effort to collect metrics and ideas for potential future improvements, the team created a short survey for the customer to evaluate their process, the value in having an event management team, and how they can improve for future events.
Team members included: Daryl Matthews, Laura Harry, Beth Frederick (of GLRC Facilites), Lori Weir, Austin Kunkel, Kari Price, Kari Pietrzyk, and Karen Johnson. Facilitator: Bob Hiltunen
For more information about Lean and Process Improvements at mtu.edu/improvement.

Inclusive Access—Increasing Student Success!

Student Buying BooksInclusive Access is a method of delivering online courseware (in the form of interactive materials and e-books) in place of traditional printed text. The Campus Store, in conjunction with publishers, e-book vendors, and campus faculty, is participating in the inclusive access program to help offset course material costs and increase opportunities for student success in the classroom. It was first used on our campus during the Fall 2017 semester with two Engineering Fundamental courses, students saw approximately a 33% savings (negotiated by faculty with publishers) on their course materials. For Spring 2018, we expanded the program to include select sections in three additional departments: Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering Technology. Course participants are contacted via email before the beginning of the semester explaining the program. They are offered an opportunity to opt-out of the inclusive access program at the beginning of the semester; however, students are encouraged to stay enrolled in the program. If students choose to opt out of the inclusive access program, it will require them to acquire course materials on their own. If students wish to download the digital content and access it beyond the duration of their course, additional fees may apply. The Campus Store has also experienced benefits from inclusive access in the matters of less processing and storage of inventory, reduced costs on purchasing and shipping, and an even more open line of dialogue with faculty and administrators. The Campus Store will be looking to expand the inclusive access program for the Fall 2018 semester.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please feel free to contact us at campusstore@mtu.edu.

Read more about Michigan Tech’s Campus Bookstore at https://www.bookstore.mtu.edu/michtech/