Category: Marketing

Marketing Student Shines at 2014 UPISRC

MTU and NMU combine for the 2014 UPISRC to showcase undergraduate student research.

The 2014 Upper Peninsula Interdisciplinary Student Research Conference (UPISRC) was organized to showcase and publicize the research being done by local students in human and behavioral sciences. This event was developed to organize a conference involving student research in: psychology, human factors, education, human effectiveness, human-centered design, social science, kinesiology, and other related fields. This year 30 students submitted abstracts, and many of the authors presented on their research at the conference for the first time. Presenters came from several departments across both MTU and NMU.

Each student gave an oral presentation for fifteen minutes in addition to a poster presentation on their research topic. The School of Business and Economics had one student participate in the UPISRC. Haley Florinki is a senior Marketing major and she presented on Assessing the Effect of a Salesperson’s Customer Service Duration Up-selling and Cross-Selling.

The abstract for her research is presented below:

The purpose of this research project is to empirically test how a salesperson’s time spent with the customers impact on their purchasing decision. More specifically this project focuses on the duration of a salesperson’s customer service and its effects on up-selling and cross-selling. Up-selling takes place when a salesperson attempts to sell a similar but better quality product than the first product exposed to a customer. Cross-selling happens when complimentary products adding to the main product that customer initially looks for creates extra customer value. Regarding the research method, this project used observation research to capture important independent variables (Time spent with customers, and product display method) and dependent variables (Whether or not the sale was made, and sales results – up selling & cross-selling). Responses from shoppers in a large local mall were recorded into the IBM-SPSS software. The questionnaire was designed for the associate to be able to interact with a customer and complete the questionnaire afterwards. The expected outcome was that the amount of time spent with a customer would increase the likelihood of up-selling and/or cross-selling. The results from the Chi-square test greatly supported the evidence that the time spent with the salesperson had a positive impact on sales. I specifically found that while a salesperson’s short time spent with customer (less than 30 sec) increased the likelihood of up-selling, her long time spent with customers (more than 90 sec) promoted that of cross-selling.

This event was sponsored by the MTU Human Factors Student Chapter and the MTU Department of Psychology.


SBE’s Reginald Hicks Elected VP of USG

Reginald Hicks is a current Marketing student with a minor in Global Business.  He’s on the Dean’s Student Advisory Council, Heritage Month Committee, National Society of Black Engineers, serves as Treasurer of the American Marketing Association and Treasurer of the Society of African American Men.  But Reggie holds a new office; he was recently elected Vice President of Michigan Tech’s Undergraduate Student Government!

According to their website, the Undergraduate Student Government (USG) “serves over 220 student organizations in conjunction with student activities. USG allocates over $800,000 annually to support organizations and enable new opportunities.”  They play a key role in on-campus traditions such as Winter Carnival, and they work to ensure that the undergraduate student body is represented.

Reggie was elated to be elected VP.  He stated, “I cannot even express in words how I feel being elected Vice President of USG!  With great humility, I am honored to lead such a vital organization on Michigan Tech’s campus, in a very profound way.  There are a couple of initiatives I would like to work on during my candidacy.”

His initiatives include:

  • fostering a campus community conducive to showing the undergraduate population how much USG cares,
  • educating students as to how USG can be their voice on campus,
  • and creating a more inclusive, yet still diverse, campus.

Reggie will be a wonderful Vice President for USG, and we wish him all the best for his term!


Alum Randy Isaacson Visits Michigan Tech

Randy Isaacson ('86) on campus as part of the Scott Pattullo Visiting Executive Speaker Series.

Randy Isaacson (’86) will be on campus March 1st and 2nd as part of the Scott Pattullo Visiting Executive Speaker Series. Join our School in welcoming Randy at one of these opportunities:

  • Thursday, March 1, 2 – 4pm: Student Networking Opportunity
    MUB Alumni Lounge A
    Free forum with students in enterprise, entrepreneurship, business, and engineering.
  • Thursday, March 1, 6 – 7:30pm: Campus Presentation
    MUB Ballroom A
    Presenting on The Biology of Business.
  • Friday, March 2, 1:30 – 3:30pm: Student and Faculty Discussion
    Academic Office Building 101
    Meet with faculty and students of the School of Business and Economics.

Biography

Randall E. Isaacson graduated from Michigan Technological University in 1986 with a BS in Biological Sciences and an MS in Rhetoric and Technical Communication in 1988. His master’s thesis studied language patterns in small group communication during simulated scientific problem solving.

He began his career as a medical copywriter at Roche Pharmaceuticals in New Jersey, and later joined VICOM/FCB, a medical advertising agency in New York. After moving to Chicago in 1990, Randy worked as a copy supervisor at Frank J. Corbett, before joining a new agency, Williams‐Labadie, in 1992. Since then, Randy has risen through the ranks as copy supervisor and creative director, and is now executive vice president at Williams‐ Labadie.

Randy and his team have won numerous awards in healthcare advertising, including recognition from Medical Marketing and Media for creating the best pharmaceutical advertisement in 2003 and the best professional digital campaign in 2007. His multidisciplinary background in biology and technical communication was excellent preparation for a very successful career in healthcare marketing and advertising.

He has maintained an ongoing relationship with Michigan Tech by providing strategic marketing guidance for the School of Business and Economics and the University, and financial support for Rhetoric and Technical Communication graduate students. He has also taught classes in the School, and hosted students for a half‐day seminar on healthcare advertising at his office in Chicago. He has developed a reputation in the industry for his ability to transform complex scientific concepts into simple, compelling marketing campaigns.

Poster for Campus Presentation (feel free to distribute).


Feb 22: Lunch Research Presentation with Jun Min

Assistant Professor in Marketing Jun Min

Join the School of Business and Economics and Assistant Professor in Marketing Junhong Min for a brown bag lunch presentation on Wednesday, February 22nd at Noon in Academic Office Building 101. The campus community is invited to attend.

His presentation is titled: “Practical Guidelines for Online Educators.”

Biography

Junhong Min earned his Ph.D. in Marketing from the State University of New York at Binghamton as well as a Master of Marketing Research (MMR) from the Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Prior to entering the Binghamton Ph.D. program Junhong Min was a senior research executive at Nielsen, NY. He has also served as a marketing consultant for a variety of marketing research projects. He brings this practical background to both his research and teaching efforts.


Marty Richardson ’79 – Marketing Maverick and Sailing Enthusiast

Marty Richardson '79

Anchors aweigh, steady as she goes, and full speed ahead! These have been the hallmarks of Martha (Marty) Kresnak Richardson’s career. An expert in marketing and a sailing enthusiast, Richardson’s connection with Michigan Tech came about in a less traditional way.“I was actually the first professional that Michigan Tech ever hired to serve in a marketing capacity,” recalls Richardson, who first arrived at Tech in 1976 with a bachelor’s in communication arts from Michigan State. Her commitment to Tech remains strong, now as chair of the Board of Control.

While employed by Tech, Richardson pursued a master’s degree in the School of Business and Economics with a specialty in marketing. “Most of the students were engineers wanting to get more of a business acumen. So, I was a bit different from the usual student at that time. I worked full time and still managed a pretty heavy course load.” After graduating, Richardson found that women with a master’s in business were rare commodities. She was offered a number of great opportunities and chose to work for the international accounting and consulting firm Coopers & Lybrand (now PricewaterhouseCoopers) in the Detroit area.

This began a ten-year career with a variety of positions of ever-increasing responsibility. From marketing supervisor to marketing manager to marketing director, Richardson saw many different facets of the company. “I traveled across the country, working with top management for their ninety-eight offices. I really learned a lot—certainly a big expansion of my master’s education.”

While enjoying her work with Coopers & Lybrand, Richardson dreamed of starting her own business. The best advice she received was from another woman entrepreneur in New York where Richardson had an office at the time. Richardson recalls, “She said, ‘Are you sure you want to do this? This is going to be the most difficult thing you’ve ever done.’ And she was right. It was the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. But, I’m proud of it and really wouldn’t change a thing.”

Richardson’s business, founded in 1989, was Services Marketing Specialists (SMS), a consulting firm providing full-service marketing and communications support to professional service firms and business-to-business organizations. Ironically, her first client was Coopers & Lybrand. Her portfolio grew into several hundred clients across the US and Canada, including those specializing in accounting, architecture, engineering, law, and health care.

However, another dream was waiting in the wings, or rather at the dock, for Richardson and her husband, Jerry, a former engineering manager for General Motors. Since leaving Detroit in September 2007, the Richard sons have logged nearly 12,000 nautical miles on a fifty-two foot trawler they named Monarch. They have traveled up and down the Atlantic Coast, to the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. “We named our boat Monarch because she goes from Ontario and northern Michigan all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico just like the monarch butterfly,” says Richardson.

According to Richardson, after college it is important to find the right job, save prudently, and never give up on your dreams. “It’s surprising we’ve become so successful with such simple advice. Although not always easy, you just have to keep your eye on your vision and persevere. I can look back and say, ‘If it hadn’t been for my company and the good salaries our employees made, where they would be now?’ It feels good to know we made a difference.”

Making a difference continues to be a part of Richardson’s life. She has been a board member or officer of numerous professional and community organizations, including the Greater Detroit Foreign Trade Zone, Lutheran Social Services of Michigan, Women’s Economic Club of Detroit, International Institute of Detroit, Leadership Detroit, and the National Association of Women Business Owners. In 2002, she was named to the Crain’s Detroit “Most Influential Women” list.

Governor Jennifer Granholm appointed her to the Michigan Tech Board of Control in 2005. In July 2010, she took over the leadership of the Board.

“It was a real honor to be appointed to the Board of Control, and serving on it is a wonderful experience,” says Richardson. “The board is populated by extraordinarily intelligent and savvy people. They are all so competent in their areas and have such a deep love for the University and commitment to its interests.”

Richardson is also enthusiastic about the new MBA programs, especially the Tech MBA Online. “Who among our alums would not want an MBA from Tech? And if you can do it online around your schedule, it’s a real draw. It’s great knowing you can take the program at a set cost that you can budget for. And the quality—well, that just can’t be beat!”

Richardson is positive about the current goals for Tech. “Having a University-wide strategic plan is key. And, the School of Business and Economics plays an important part in the accomplishment of a number of University goals. The Board and administration are always focusing on how we can provide a world view for the students. Not only how to invent the technology but how to apply it to bettering mankind. The business school provides the critical link between technology and real-world applications.”

This article was originally published in Impact, the Michigan Tech School of Business and Economics magazine.