Category: Graduate Programs

School of Business and Economics Announces New Fall 2019 Programs

The Academic Office Building on Michigan Tech's campus is featured

To better serve and provide opportunities for STEM students, the School of Business and Economics (SBE) now offers a minor in business as an attractive addition for students of any major who will go on to work for a company or organization or start their own enterprise. The content allows graduates to differentiate themselves with a foundation of business skills.

In addition, our recently approved master’s degree in engineering management, a hybrid engineering-business degree, focuses on managerial knowledge, business literacy, and other relevant skills critical for successful operations in various engineering/technology-intensive industries.

Finally, to infuse technology into our accounting curriculum, new courses and content have been created resulting in the new concentration in data analytics. This fall, students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in accounting with also be able to earn an 18-credit concentration in data analytics. Those seeking to earn the Master of Science in Accounting degree will also be able to earn a graduate certificate in accounting analytics or forensic examination. “The concentration and certificate programs leverage accounting, information systems, and math coursework to help students acquire a valuable skill set encompassing databases, data cleaning and visualization, statistical programming, and analytical methods,” says program director and professor of practice, Joel Tuoriniemi. 

According to Dean Johnson, dean of the School of Business and Economics, these new offerings leverages SBE’s strengths as a business school embedded in a technological institution.

To learn more about any of our programs, please email business@mtu.edu.

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Graduate Student Spotlight: Creating the Future of Natural Resource Economics in Mining

Josephine Amponsem, a master’s student in Applied Natural Resource Economics in the School of Business and Economics at Michigan Tech, is working alongside Emanuel Oliveira, assistant professor of economics, building a socioeconomic database with more than one million observations on factors impacting entrepreneurship. In addition to collating and cleaning data, Amponsem is using Stata, an econometric software for analyzing huge amounts of economic data.

Amponsem is also gaining hands-on experience working with Latika Gupta, assistant professor of economics, collecting and mapping data on energy efficiency in the steel industry. “We ask ourselves what is the data telling us, and how can it be used to make economic decisions,” Amponsem says.

Michigan Tech graduate student Josephine Amponsem
School of Business and Economics graduate student Josephine Amponsem takes a research break outside the Academic Office Building.

Originally from Ghana, West Africa, where she earned her undergraduate degree in materials engineering, Amponsem has professional experience working as a metallurgist in the mining industry. Her passion for natural resource management is rooted in her home country’s illegal gold mining crisis and management of recently discovered oil beneath the sea.

In the traditionally male-dominated field, Josephine was the only female on her 11-member team. Every day she set out to validate her work through determination and focus. Despite the challenges, she loved the environment and had an eye toward managerial positions.

The obstacles she faced at the mine grew more dire with the news that it would soon shut down. “I thought, ‘What am I going to do next? What are my opportunities?’” Her former manager suggested she pursue a US education to differentiate herself.

With her strong interest in natural resources economics, she Googled “mineral economics” and investigated more about the first school to populate: Michigan Tech.

“I discovered Michigan Tech has one of the strongest and best-funded programs in the world. In my master’s program in the School of Business and Economics, I am learning how companies are run. I am learning decision-making tools, the economics of managing natural resources, and environmental issues that are being looked at worldwide. The key issues impacting almost every industry.”

Amponsem is on track to complete her thesis looking at the socio-economic effects of illegal mining in rural Ghana in spring 2018. Her ultimate desire is to make an impact. She may pursue a corporate managerial job back home and isn’t ruling out a PhD.

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