Author: ehgroth

Making a Difference Award Winners Recognized

image79734-persSeveral staff members were honored with Michigan Tech Staff Council Making a Difference Awards at an awards program in the MUB Wednesday.

Team of Amanda Cadwell (CEE), Christina Sarazin, Catherine Burns and Lori Weir
This team was nominated for their effort in making last year’s UAW classes a reality. Through collaboration, hard work and determination they created a cutting-edge program to advance the skills of UAW workers that will be a benchmark for other universities. According to President Glenn Mroz, it has already generated interest with UAW at the state level.

Visit the Staff Council blog for a photo of this year’s recipients and a list of all who were nominated.

Making a Difference Award Winners Recognized
Making a Difference Award Winners Recognized

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CEE Senior Design Colloquium

IMG_0455The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department held the fall 2014 senior design team presentations at the Memorial Union Building Alumni Lounge. This semester students in four sections have undertaken a wide range of interesting projects to fulfill the Department’s design project requirement on December 9th and 11th, 2014.  

Flyer: Senior Design Colloquium Fall 2014

CEE Photo Gallery
Schedule:
Tuesday, December 9th:
8:00—10:00 am

UP Luge Club-Lucy Hill Luge Improvements
UP Luge Club-Lucy Hill Luge Improvements

UP Luge Club-Lucy Hill Luge Improvements

  • Building Designs & Master Plan—LEED Consultants
    Jacob Edwards, Project Manager
    Trevor Ehredt, Aaron Lee, Weicke Dai
  • Roads/Parking/Utilities/Surveys—
    ABKM Engineers and Surveyors
    Brent Moore, Project Manager
    Matt Smith, Adam Tupancy,
    Kevin Bennett
  • Bridges and Pedestrian Access—JAMN Bridge Services
    Alex Brown, Project Manager
    Nick Toomey, Jay Hansen, Mengchan Wang

7:00—9:00 pm

Portage Lake Golf Course Improvements
Portage Lake Golf Course Improvements

Portage Lake Golf Course Improvements

  • PAR-T Engineering:
    Paige Lentovich, Project Manager
    Richelle Grosskopf, Tanner Kragenbrink, Alyssa Myers
  • Greens Architect:
    Derek Brandt, Project Manager
    Tyler Brown, Ali Dahlbacka, Xiaojun Guo
  • C3—Copper Country Consultants:
    Nick Snow, Project Manager
    Ashley Cline, Hanqing Song, Nelson Weinke
  • RMZ
    Chris Roell, Project Manager
    Matt Messina, Qishen Zhang

Thursday, December 11th:
8:00—10:00 am

Development Plan: Piers Gorge Unit of the Menominee River State Recreation Area
Development Plan: Piers Gorge Unit of the Menominee River State Recreation Area

Development Plan: Piers Gorge Unit of the Menominee River State Recreation Area

  • Master Plan
    Dylan Byington
    Brent Cousino
    Deanna Occhietti
  • Transportation Elements—KDNC
    Dylan Byington, Project Manager
    Nina Bonnano, Chelsea Dubreuil, Kaitlin Learmont
  • Environmental Elements—
    Keweenaw Environmental
    Consultants
    Brent Cousino, Project Manager
    Sophia Bainbridge, Nicole Iutzi
    Joe Kalcyznski, Jiaxun Liu
  • Structural Elements—River View Engineering
    Deanna Occhietti, Project Manager
    Alex Chizmadia, Wanbing Bai,
    Sam Kolesar

7:00—9:00 PM

Panama—International Senior Design
Panama—International Senior Design

Panama—International Senior Design

  • Water System—Filo Verde
    ABC’s Inc.
    Alyssa Smith, Project Manager
    Caitlin Wotruba, Rebecca Green, Zichao Wang
  • Water System—Bajo Gavilan
    Reasonable Engr.
    Kevin Madson, Project Manager
    Claira Hart, Megan Farrish, Erika Poli, William Tillmans
  • Water System—La Ensenada/Nidori
    Bolen Consultants
    Madeliana Martin, Project Manager
    Tia Scarpelli, Kelli Heiden, Adam Tuff, Logan Anderson

Senior Design Colloquium Fall 2014

CEE Faculty for Senior Design Program: David Watkins, William Leder, Michael T. Drewyor
CEE Faculty for Senior Design Program: David Watkins, William Leder, Michael T. Drewyor

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Nathan Cody Hayden | 1993 – 2014

hayden
The Department is sad to inform that Michigan Tech civil engineering student, Nathan Cody Hayden, 21 of Kalkaska, died unexpectedly on December 4th, 2014. Born and raised in Kalkaska, he is the son of Malinda Hayden and the late Cody Hayden and Krista Bachelor.
Nathan graduated from Kalkaska High School in 2011. He was an honor student, participating in football and wrestling. Nathan was famous for his role as Kalkaska Man. He had the ability to engage the entire Kalkaska community and crowds with his dynamic personality and charisma. He started playing on the Michigan Tech Rugby Club his freshman year and loved every moment. Nathan spent the last six months working on his internship in Bay City, with Soil and Materials Engineers.
Born: October 06, 1993
Died: December 04, 2014

Obituary Link

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Civil Engineering Seminar: Bio-Inspired Surfboard Fins: Comparisons of Flow Fields and Lift/Drag Forces using CFD models and Experimental data

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar:
Speaker: Megan MacNeill, Civil Engineering Graduate Student
Thursday, December 4, 2014, 4:00 – 5:00 PM, Dow 642

Title: Bio-Inspired Surfboard Fins: Comparisons of Flow Fields and Lift/Drag Forces using CFD models and Experimental data”

This presentation will give a brief overview of the dynamics of wave surfing, in addition to presenting my current thesis research approach and findings. The theory of wave development and how to surf will be touched upon to give the audience insight into the physics of surfing. An in-depth summary of the purpose of surfboard fins and fin hydrodynamics will also be covered.
The project compares 10 different surfboard fins by means of computational fluid dynamic modeling and experimental analysis from data gathered in the water channel in Dillman Room 110. The fins were self-designed by inspiration of dorsal fin profiles from aquatic species. The single fin set- ups are compared by means of lift and drag forces as well as visual flow analysis. The geometric modeling and CFD approach will be discussed accompanied by the experimental methodology. Because this project is in its beginning stages, there is little known about the results. Future plans for the project will be discussed along with potential post-project ideas.

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EPSSI Seminar: Shock Tube Recreations of Shock Waves and Jets Generated During Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

The Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Institute
proudly presents:
Ezequiel Medici, MTU ME-EM Research Engineer
The EPSSI seminar for Monday, December 1, 4:00 p.m., M&M U113

“Shock Tube Recreations of Shock Waves and Jets Generated During Explosive Volcanic Eruptions”

Abstract: At the beginning of a suddenly explosive volcanic eruptions two types of phenomena can be observed, the formation of a shock wave immediately followed by a supersonic jet of expanding vapor-solid-liquid mixture. The intensity of the shock wave and the structure of the supersonic jet can carry a significant amount of information about the intensity and the dynamics of the volcanic eruption. Despite the hazard they represent to the immediate surrounding area of the volcano vent, these atmospheric shock waves and the subsequent sonic wave can be safely measured at a long distance from the vent. This characteristic makes the measurement of shock/sonic waves suitable for safe, real-time remote sensing of the conditions at the volcanic vent during the eruption. Preliminary results, based on the experiment performed on the shock tube, indicate a strong correlation between the energy released by the eruption, calculated by standard methods post eruption, and the intensity of the shock wave as measured through its pressure field. This correlation could ultimately lead to a more reliable model of shock/sound wave propagation which will serve as an early warning system for the air traffic control.

Immediately after the shock wave, an over pressurized jet mixture of vapor, solid particles, and liquid begins to expand. This mixture typically contains a relatively high concentration of solid particles of different size. To study the coupled interaction between the expanding gas and the particles, a series of analog explosive volcanic experiments using the atmospheric shock tube were performed. High-speed shadowgraph imaging of the expanding jet mixtures is recorded for different initial jet energy, particle sizes and particle concentrations. The study and observations of the interaction between the mixture of expanding gas and particles can elucidate the mechanisms acting during the initial stage of the formation of ash plumes or pyroclastic flows.

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Environmental Engineering Seminar: Virus Removal from Water and Bioterapeutics

Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar: Monday, December 1, 2014, 3-4 PM, GLRC 202, Public Welcome
Speaker: Dr. Caryn L. Heldt
Title: Virus Removal from Water and Bioterapeutics

The removal of viruses can save millions of lives through the creation of safe drinking water and reducing the cost of biotherapeutic production to increase access to live saving drugs. In order to create more robust virus removal methods, we need to better understand the surface characteristics of viruses. The most well-known surface characteristic of viruses is negative charge. To take advantage of this, we created filtration membranes with a positively charged polymer. An ideal virus removal membrane would have low transmembrane pressure, high water flux, high pathogen removal, and have a long, workable lifetime. To provide these qualities, we created a nanofiber filtration material that has a microporous structure for high water flux and low transmembrane pressure. Viruses adsorbed to the high surface area nanofibers through electrostatic interactions for virus removal. A lesser-known surface characteristic of viruses is hydrophobicity. We have evidence that viruses are hydrophobic and therefore, we have explored novel flocculants for virus removal that take advantage of virus hydrophobicity. We have been able to remove two viruses with theses flocculants, and we continue to explore the effect of other viruses in our flocculant system. The flocculant system is more applicable to the removal of viruses from biotherapeutics, but other flocculants, based on hydrophobicity and are less expensive, could be applied to water treatment.

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Seven students represent Michigan Tech at Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar

IMG_3704640Seven Michigan Tech students attended the Kiewitt Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar held in Omaha, Nebraska at the Kiewitt Corporate Headquarters November 6-8, 2014. Candidates were chosen from a pool of sophomores and juniors who have demonstrated leadership skills, a drive for success, and a passion for the construction and/or engineering professions. Kiewitt selected 50 collegiate female leaders to participate in the event designed to challenge and develop their leadership skills. Attending were civil engineering majors Emily Blaney, Lauren Krueger, Natalie Parker, Autumn Storteboom, and Rachelle Wiegand, along with mechanical engineering majors Erika Harris and Erin Richie.

“We are so proud of our students, especially with such a strong representation at this nationally recognized event,” said Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Tess Ahlborn. “As for the students, exposure to such a supportive environment of leadership at a corporate level can be a huge turning point for many young professionals in this stage of their career. These women are headed to very high places.”

“It was a wonderful learning experience,” said Blaney. I absolutely enjoyed the subject matter, the events that we took part in, and the opportunity to make connections with other women in my field.” Blaney felt especially inspired by the professionals she met during the event. “Their knowledge and drive was astounding, and really fueled my love for civil engineering,” she added.

Seven engineering students from Michigan Tech's CEE and ME departments attended the Kiewett Women's Construction Leadership Seminar in Omaha, Nebraska. Left to right - Erika Harris, Natalie Parker, Rachelle Wiegand, Lauren Krueger, Emily Blaney, Erin Richie, and Autumn Storteboom.

Seven engineering students from Michigan Tech’s CEE and ME departments attended the Kiewett Women’s Construction Leadership Seminar in Omaha, Nebraska. Left to right – Erika Harris, Natalie Parker, Rachelle Wiegand, Lauren Krueger, Emily Blaney, Erin Richie, and Autumn Storteboom.

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Michigan Department of Transportation – Hall of Honor: Thomas R. Irwin, P.E., ’63

nov13-14aThomas R. Irwin, P.E., ’63, Michigan Tech Civil Engineering alumni, was one of the 2014 honorees to join the Michigan Department of Transportation Hall of Honor. Irwin entered the highway construction industry in 1969. He has held prominent positions in state and nation transportation associations throughout his career.

He was president and owner of Hodgkiss & Douma Inc. (H&D) from 1984 to 2005. Irwin believes in continuous knowledge growth and personal involvement in order to develop personally and encourage others to develop. He is past president of the Michigan Road Builders Association (now the Michigan Infrastructure Transportation Association), past president of the Michigan Asphalt Paving Association (now the Asphalt Paving Association of Michigan), past state director of the National Asphalt Paving Association, past state director of the American Road and Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA), and past co-chair of ARTBA’s environmental committee. He was past president of the Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech) Fund board of trustees, serving on the board for 11 years. Irwin received Michigan Tech’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2014 and the Petoskey Regional Chamber of Commerce President’s Award in 2003, and other awards throughout the years.

The Hall of Honor, a permanent display in the Van Wagoner Transportation Building in Lansing, was established in 1971 to honor individuals who have made outstanding contributions to developing Michigan’s network of highways, roads, streets, transit systems, railroads, airports, and waterways. Members are elected by a committee representing a wide range of transportation industry organizations. With the inclusion of this year’s honorees, a total of 83 people have been inducted into the Hall of Honor.

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Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: Analysis of Pile- Supported Slabs under Concentrated loads

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar
Thursday 30th October, 2014; Dow 642, 4 – 5 pm

Aneesha Reddy, Current Graduate Student, Civil Engineering, Michigan Tech

Presentation Topic: Analysis of Pile- Supported Slabs under Concentrated loads
A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of:
Master of Science in Structural Engineering
Submitted to the University of East London on 27th September, 2013

The purpose of the project is to find out the maximum loads that can be applied to pile-supported ground floor slabs while complying with the critical slope requirements of TR34. A numerical analysis of pile supported ground floor slabs under unit point load of 1KN is performed using STAAD.Pro. The parameters varying for this research are thickness of the slab (150mm, 200mm, 250mm and 300mm), the span lengths of the slab (3m, 4m, 5m and 6m) and the panel type on which the point load is applied (Interior, edge and corner panels). The maximum deflections obtained for each slab are used to calculate critical slopes formed on the respective slabs. The critical loads calculated are compared to the permissible slopes given by TR34. The maximum loads to be applied on the slab are calculated and design charts are created for FMA Property I and DMA for Property I and II. These design charts can be used to directly find out the maximum concentrated load that can be applied.

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Civil Engineering Seminar: Uncertainty in Civil Engineering Design

Bulleit-2010
Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: Speaker: Dr. William Bulliet, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan Tech
Thursday, October 23, 2014; 4:05 – 5:00 PM Dow 642 Public Welcome

“Uncertainty in Civil Engineering Design”

Civil engineering design includes many uncertainties, some of which are obvious and some of which many engineers may never have consciously considered. The level of uncertainty for civil engineering systems, mostly non-prototypical engineered systems, is larger than smaller scale engineered products because prototype testing is not possible. This presentation will examine the uncertainties facing engineers who design non-prototypical engineered systems and consider the ways that engineers have developed to manage those uncertainties in a manner that allows design decisions to be made. Uncertainty in design is impossible to escape, and the way it is managed affects both engineers and society. The way engineers approach uncertainty has philosophical, technical, and even ethical implications for the design and construction of civil engineering systems.

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