Author: Sue Hill

Family Science and Engineering Night at Barkell

Brian Doughty demonstrating in classBarkell Elementary School hosted Family Science and Engineering Night Wednesday evening, February 6, 2019, giving children grades K-5 opportunities to think outside of the box in the fields of science and engineering, with educational yet fun activities.

Brian Doughty of the Michigan Tech Center for Science and Environmental Outreach, led an activity in which fourth- and fifth-grade students explored generating electricity with a lemon.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Graham Jaehnig.

Students Learn About Ice

The students took a hike through the winter trail at the Nara Nature Center, as well as participated in some hands on activities inside. “This program allows roughly 4,000 students in the Western Upper Peninsula to experience the outdoors and to learn science in the outdoors,” said Joan Chadde, Michigan Tech’s Director for Science and Environmental Outreach.

Read more at the Keweenaw Report.

Brian Doughty Nara Nature
Brian Doughty leads the Nara Nature expedition.

Nara Nature Field Trip TV

Much of the program’s funding comes from contributions and strong community support. “We are super excited to have received a $20,000 grant from the Wege Foundation this year to continue the program.” – Chadde

Watch the Video, by Lee Snitz.


Jennifer Becker Publishes on Sustainability Metrics for Water Resource Recovery

Jennifer Becker
Jennifer Becker

Jennifer G. Becker (CEE) is one of the lead authors on a paper that defines the sustainability metrics that should be used to assess water resource recovery facilities of the future. The paper, which was just published in Water Environment Research, was a follow-up to a National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop to which Becker and other leaders in the field of water and wastewater treatment and reuse were invited.

The workshop focused on developing evaluation metrics to advance the Facilities Accelerating Science & Technology (FAST) Water Network. FAST includes over 90 test bed facilities dedicated to accelerating innovation and adoption of water energy, and nutrient recovery systems.

Sustainability metrics for assessing water resource recovery facilities of the future

Pablo K. Cornejo Jennifer Becker Krishna Pagilla Weiwei Mo Qiong Zhang James R. Mihelcic Kartik Chandran Belinda Sturm Daniel Yeh Diego Rosso
First published: 25 January 2019 https://doi.org/10.2175/106143017X15131012187980
Volume 91, Issue1, January 2019, Pages 45-53

The recovery of water, energy, and nutrients from water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) is needed to address significant global challenges, such as increasing water demand and decreasing availability of nonrenewable resources. To meet these challenges, innovative technological developments must lead to increased adoption of water and resource recovery processes, while addressing stakeholder needs (e.g., innovators, practitioners, regulators).

Read more at Water Environment Research.


Sarah Washko Attends Snow Measurement Field School

Sarah Washko takes measurements in the snowSarah Washko, an environmental engineering MS student, participated in the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) Snow Measurement Field School on January 6-11, 2019, in Bozeman Montana. The NASA-funded course provided training for performing high-quality snow measurements in the field, as well as in the fundamentals of snow hydrology analysis. In addition to traditional field methods, remote sensing techniques were also explored.

Each day in the field concluded with a presentation of the day’s findings. The final day culminated in a student designed field campaign at the Bridger Bowl Ski area. The workshop was designed to cultivate snow measurement and research design skills.


Julie Ross is an Unsung Hero

Julie Ross
Julie Ross

At an awards program in the Memorial Union Ballroom Wednesday (Jan. 9, 2018), staff members were honored with the Staff Council Making a Difference Award.

Julie Ross, academic advisor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, was a recipient of the Unsung Hero Award. Julie’s nominator states “When the faculty member who established the CEE Student Success Center left the University, Julie picked up the role of advisor for this group because she knew the services provided by the student success coaches were essential to the Department’s teaching mission. Without her stepping up and taking the advisor reigns, this group would not exist today.

Read more at the Staff Council blog.


Small Water Systems Project Funding

Tim Colling
CTT Director Tim Colling

Timothy Colling (CEE/Center for Technology and Training), is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $18,160 grant from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

John Velat (CEE/Center for Rural and Tribal Community Resilience) is Co-PI on the project “Smart Management for Small Water Systems FY18.”

This is the first year of a potential three-year project totaling $39,977.

By Sponsored Programs.


CEE Graduate Students on the Road

Marjan Monfarednsab to Attend weSTEM Conference

weSTEM conference showing presentation.Marjan Monfarednsab, a civil engineering graduate student, applied for and was accepted to the Society of Women Engineers’ (SWE) Women Empowered in STEM (weSTEM) Conference on February 23, 2019.

The weSTEM conference provides a forum through which current and future STEM leaders can motivate and inspire each other to excel at the frontier of scientific advancement and develop solutions for the next generation of technical challenges.

Monfarednsab is the first SWE graduate student member at Michigan Tech to be accepted to the conference. Her travel and conference costs will be funded by the SWE section and the College of Engineering, along with the conference sponsors.

Emily Gamm Attends American Segmental Bridge Institute Convention

Emily Gamm, a structures grad student, was awarded a scholarship to attend the American Segmental Bridge Institute (ASBI) Convention in Chicago, Nov. 5-7, 2018. She participated in technical sessions, committee meetings, networking opportunities (including meeting Michigan Tech alumnus Tim Barry) and a tour of a segmental bridge construction project. The tour also included an opportunity to sign the inside face of one of the match cast segments.

Emily Gamm Signing Section
Emily Gamm at the Signing Section
Emily Gamm Match Cast Section
Emily Gamm at the Match Cast Section
Large, structural piers are shown.
Piers

Hayden Henderson Travels to North American Lake Management Society Conference

Hayden Henderson
Hayden Henderson

Environmental Engineering MS student Hayden Henderson traveled to the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) annual conference in Cincinnati to present his work titled: The Role of Anoxia, Entrainment, and Intrusions in Mediating Phosphorus Trophic State Dynamics to the general audience. In addition, he was asked to speak to the attendees of a workshop on internal phosphorus loading regarding a specific research site and subsequent findings. The 38th International Symposium of NALMS took place October 30 to November 2, 2018.

After returning from the conference, Hayden was informed that the research poster he presented at the conference titled: “Neither Wolf nor Dog: P-Management in a Quasi Polymictic Lake” was awarded 1st place in the Jody Connor Student Award poster competition.


Funding for Amlan Mukherjee on Pavement Life Cycle Project

Amlan Mukherjee
Amlan Mukherjee

Amlan Mukherjee (CEE/MTTI) is the principal investigator on a project that has received a $162,256 contract with the ESC. Inc on a project funded by Federal Highway Administration. The project is titled “Mapping of Unit/Product System Processes for Pavement Life Cycle Assessment.”

This is the first phase of a three-year project potentially totaling $206,029.


Veronica Webster on Intense Rain Events

Veronica Webster
Veronica Webster

HOUGHTON — Going by historical norms, the storm that hit the Copper Country on June 17 was a 1,000-year event.

But the combination of warmer, wetter weather and changes in land use means events like it could become more common, said Veronica Webster, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Michigan Technological University. Webster’s Tuesday lecture, “Is Intense Rain the New Normal? Understanding Our Risks” was the second in the Keweenaw Natural History Seminar Series, which is focused on the causes and effects of and responses to the flood.

As development increases, the community needs to consider how runoff could increase from changes in the climate or the watershed, and take into account how roadways affect runoff patterns.

Where we choose to build and how we choose to build impacts our resilience to the increasing risk of heavy storm events and flood events,” she said.

Read more at the Mining Gazette, by Garrett Neese.