Category: Outreach

Brimley Area School Students Visit MTU

Brimley Brimley2

Thirty middle-school students, plus two science teachers, and two chaperones from Brimley Area Schools visited Michigan Tech and the Keweenaw Peninsula from Sept. 28-30, hosted by Ted Bornhorst, executive director, A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum and Joan Chadde, Director of the Center for Science & Environmental Outreach.  The Brimley Area Schools student population is 54% Native American and 51% low income. Students participated in a half-day of STEM activities on campus with Brian Barkdoll and “Kiko” de Melo e Silva, faculty and research scientist, respectively, in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Dr. Sarah Sun in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

“We were pleased to provide this unique opportunity for the Brimley students that may spark their interest to pursue a STEM degree at Michigan Tech,” explained Bornhorst.

“This was a great group of students,” observed Chadde. “We plan to work with them to make this an annual visit.”


Teachers From Flint Studying Water at Michigan Tech

Agassiz
Agassiz

Water and the City of Flint have garnered plenty of headlines this year. This week, 13 teachers from the Flint area are on the campus of Michigan Tech for a four-day teacher institute focused on water and water issues.

The special interdisciplinary teacher institute will focus on three specific areas: Flint River Watershed; Drinking Water Treatment; Wastewater Treatment. The event is coordinated by the Ride the Waves program, Martin Auer (CEE) principal investigator and the Center for Science and Environmental Outreach.

Read more at Tech Today, by Joan Chadde.

Flint Teachers visit U.P. to learn about good water quality

Flint’s population continues to try and recover from their water crisis and these lessons will help deal with those lingering issues. Hamaday Middle School Science Teacher Arleatha Bryant said, “I’ve had at least seven children tell me they were tested positive for lead, and so we’ve been doing a lot of research on different foods you can eat and things you can do to try and alleviate some of the issues that may occur with this situation.”

And most importantly to educate people so such a situation doesn’t happen again. MTU Civil & Environmental Engineering Professor Martin Auer said, “These are the people that are going to change the lives that need to get this work done over the next several decades. If we can reach these teachers, then we can stimulate a process that’s going to engage the young people and that’s where the future is.”

Read more and watch the video at ABC 10 UP.

Flint Teachers ABC 10


Students Visit Rail Yards in Superior, Wisconsin

SYP Rail 2016KBJR-TV Channel 6 (NBC) in Duluth broadcast a story about students from Michigan Tech’s Summer Youth Program Rail and Intermodal Transportation Institute visiting rail yards in Superior, Wisconsin.

From Tech Today.

Michigan Tech students get an up close look at trains in Superior

Today, students from throughout the country enrolled in Michigan Tech’s Summer Youth Program’s Rail and Intermodel Transportation program were in Superior to get an up close look at Railroad Transportation.

Read more and watch the video at KBJR-TV Channel 6, by Anthony Matt.


David Hand Quoted on Flint Water

David Hand
David Hand

David Hand, chair of the department of civil and environmental engineering, was quoted in the article “Flint Water: Where Science Took a Backseat to the Money.”

The article, by Seth Augenstein, was printed in Laboratory Equipment.

From Tech Today.

Flint Water: Where Science Took a Backseat to the Money

General Motors had a problem. The engine blocks in their Flint, Mich. plant were corroding as fast as they came off the production line. In the few months since the city had switched from Detroit water to the supply of the nearby Flint River, everything the factory produced was rusting over.

Tests quickly revealed the cause: elevated levels of chlorides were allowing the water to more-easily oxidize the metal.

The city switched to the river water in April 2014. GM reported its problems within months. After more months of inaction from the city leaders, the company alone switched back to Detroit water in December 2014.

“GM did inform the city,” said David Hand, chair of the civil and environmental engineering department at Michigan Technological University, in an interview with Laboratory Equipment. “No doubt (the city) should have realized they should evaluate the water.”

Read more at Laboratory Equipment, by Seth Augenstein.


Michigan Tech’s Science and Environmental Outreach Program Hosts Summer Science Camps

WUP

Students from grades first through sixth are taking part in two summer science camps being offered this week at Michigan Tech.  The camps are being put on by the Western Upper Peninsula Center for Science, Mathematics and Environmental Education.  To see the TV6 News story on the camp, visit: http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/content/news/Students-take-part-in-science-camp-during-summer-break-383007411.html


Students Learn Environmental Stewardship at Torch Lake

Torch Lake
Torch Lake

Students learn environmental stewardship through planting, monitoring, birding at Torch Lake Superfund site

LAKE LINDEN — Despite some chilly, windy weather and predictions for snow in mid-May, Lake Linden-Hubbell High School 10th grade students spent an afternoon on the shores of Torch Lake planting red-osier dogwoods and dark-green bulrushes, bird watching and installing nesting boxes for birds, and playing disc golf just for fun.

Coordinated by Michigan Tech’s Center for Science and Environmental Outreach, along with EPA and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the students’ monitoring assists EPA’s efforts in charting the progress of the vegetation cap and habitat reconstruction done under the Superfund program. This project is the first of its kind to utilize students for the collection of data for use by EPA.

“Engaging students in learning about, and contributing to, the improvement of their local environment and community, is an excellent way to create lifelong natural resource stewards,” observed Joan Chadde, director, Michigan Tech Center for Science and Environmental Outreach, and a partner on the Lake Superior Stewardship Leadership Team.

Read more at Keweenaw Now, by Michele Bourdieu.


Students Can Investigate Lake Superior on the Agassiz

Ride the Waves
Ride the Waves

Michigan Tech’s “Ride the Waves Program” invites Copper Country youth in Grades four to 12 to join scientists from Michigan Tech’s Great Lakes Research Center (GLRC) in the exploration of Lake Superior, Portage Waterway and Torch Lake. There are four programs to choose from that will accommodate 17 youth and chaperones. They’re fun, educational and free.

“Aquatic Food Web and Lab Investigation” (three-hour session, one and half hours on the Agassiz and one and a half hours in lab at the GLRC). Find out how scientists investigate water quality and collect samples to examine in the lab. Find out “what makes a lake trout?” All ages.

“Mine Waste Remediation and Torch Lake Restoration” (four-hour session, two hours on Agassiz and two hours on land; meet at the Lake Linden Marina). The copper mining and milling history of the Copper Country is explored by land and water. Students visit historic copper milling sites, reclaimed mine waste sites and the bottom of Torch Lake. Ideal for middle school students.

“Navigation Exploration” (Four-hour session, two hours on the Agassiz and two hours in classroom at the GLRC). Students in grades four through six will use chart dividers and compasses to make mathematical measurements of distance, angles and lines to determine the Agassiz’s position on a navigational chart. Students grades eight through 12 will use these same skills to navigate the Agassiz to a new location. Using algebra, students will be able to determine the accuracy of their navigation.

“Lake Superior’s Ring of Fire” (three to four hour session on the Agassiz). Explore an area in Lake Superior where the shrimplike organism Diporeia is up to 20 times more abundant than in any other part of the lake. How does this affect the Lake Superior food web?  Ideal for high school students.

Register online.

List all dates and times that work for you and we will reply and fit you into the earliest available slot. Groups of five or more students will be given preference in scheduling, so get with your friends and form a group.

The “Ride the Waves Program” is made possible with a grant from General Motors to Michigan Tech’s Department of Civil and Environmentanl Engineering (PI: Martin Auer) and the GLRC.

More than 3000 youth have benefited from GM’s support, now in its fourth year. For more Information email Joan Chadde or Lloyd Wescoat or call 7-3341

From Tech Today, by Joan Chadde.


STEM Career Tour at Michigan Tech

STEM Tour

Assistant professor Daisuke Minakata and a research engineer/laboratory director David Perram outreached high school students from Lake Linden-Hubble High School on June 1st, 2016. They provided an overview of “Cleaning Water” project, giving high school students hands-on experience in ‘ppm’ and ‘ppb’ concentrations level of chemical contaminants in water and an introduction to advanced water treatment technologies in the CEE department process lab. The outreach activity was a part of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) CAREER Tour with funding support from the Lake Superior Stewardship Initiative and coordinated by the MTU Center for Science & Environmental Outreach and Western U.P, Center for Science, Math and Environmental Education. Joan Chadde in CEE coordinated the overall activity.

See schedule:

LLH EnvCareer Tour Schedule 06.01.16 FINAL

For more information, contact:

MTU Center for Science & Environmental Outreach

jchadde@mtu.edu or 906-487-3341

Made possible with funding from the Lake Superior Stewardship Initiative and coordinated by the MTU Center for Science & Environmental Outreach and Western U.P. Center for Science, Math and Environmental Education.


Michigan Tech University 2016 Summer Teacher Institutes

2016 Summer Michigan Tech University Summer Teacher Institutes


June 20-24  ED5641 Global Change Teacher Institute 

June 27-July 1  ED5601 Engaging Students in Authentic Science Research Teacher Institute

July 11-15    ED 5640 Designing a Sustainable Future Teacher Institute

Application deadline May 1, 2016. Complete teacher institute applications online.

See link after each description below orhttp://wupcenter.mtu.edu/

To register for Michigan Tech credits: MTU Cognitive & Learning Sciences will contact you with registration information (Tel: 906-487-2460)

For more information: Joan Chadde, Institute Coordinator (jchadde@mtu.edu or 906-487-3341)

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ED5641 Global Change Teacher Institute (for Grades 4-12 Teachers)

Date:  June 20-24, 2016

This 5-day Institute will prepare you to engage your middle and high school students in a real-world study of the effects of global change on ecosystems, including the impacts of climatic change on forests— elevated carbon dioxide and ozone levels, nitrogen saturation, acid rain, and invasive species. Teachers will participate in the MEECS Climate Change workshop and receive the NEW MEECS Climate Change Unit.

Cost: $400 off campus includes five lunches, 2 MTU graduate credits and instructional materials. $700 on campus includes 5 nights lodging & meals from Monday morning through Friday lunch, 2 MTU graduate credits and instructional materials.

Summer Institute Information PDF

Summer Institute Information HTML

Register for Global Change Teacher Institute

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ED5601 Engaging Students in Authentic Science Research Teacher Institute (for Grades 4-12 Teachers)

Date: M-F, June 27-July 1, 2016

Teachers gain skills in designing original research, rather than merely conducting cookbook experiments. Teachers will learn research design methods and procedures, and participate in a variety of research field and lab studies.

Cost: $400 off campus includes five lunches, 2 MTU graduate credits and instructional materials. $700 on campus includes 5 nights lodging & meals from Monday morning through Friday lunch, 2 MTU graduate credits and instructional materials.

Summer Institute Information PDF

Summer Institute Information HTML

Register for Design a Sustainable Future

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ED5640 Designing a Sustainable Future Teacher Institute (for Grades 4-12 Teachers)

Date: July 11 – 15, 2016

The institute will introduce teachers to the field of sustainability through examination of product life cycles, product recycling, repurposing materials, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, and biomass, designing energy- and resource-efficient buildings, site designs to reduce storm water runoff and increase biodiversity, and efficient transportation systems and vehicles. The institute will address the Next Generation Science Standards and be taught by a variety of Michigan Tech University faculty and graduate students, along with community and teacher experts.

Cost: $400 off campus includes five lunches, 2 MTU graduate credits and instructional materials. $700 on campus includes five nights lodging & meals from Monday morning through Friday lunch, 2 MTU graduate credits and materials.

Summer Institute Information PDF

Summer Institute Information HTML

Register for Design a Sustainable Future