Category: Seminars

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: March 1

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar:
Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (March. 1st)
location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Topics:

1. Application of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) as Thin-Bonded Overlay for Concrete Bridge Decks
Presenter: Sarah Shann, MS student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Devin Harris)

Abstract: As transportation infrastructure across the globe approaches the end of its service life, new innovative materials and applications are needed to sustainably repair and prevent damage to these structures. The feasibility of using Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) as a thin-bonded overlay on concrete bridge decks is investigated in this study. Design optimization of the bridge deck overlay system was examined to minimize overlay thickness, dead load, and cure time without sacrificing bond integrity or loss of protective capabilities. This was done with a 3-D finite element model of a simply supported bridge under a notional truck, the HL-93 design truck common to the United States, in the worst case loading position.

2. Title: Increasing the Piezoelectric Effect in Cement Paste.

Presenter: Benjamin Roskoskey, MS Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Andrew Swartz).

Abstract: The object of this study is to attempt to increase the piezoelectric effect (and as a result the reverse piezoelectric effect) in cement paste. Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are frequently used nowadays to monitor the health of structures. However they are expensive and when embedded within concrete, can separate from the concrete and cause degradation due to differences between their Young’s modulus and thermal expansion coefficient and those of the concrete. The expectation is that the concrete itself, by utilizing its piezoelectric effect, can be used as the sole means of structural health monitoring for a structure.


Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: February 23

Civil Engineering Seminars:
Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (Feb. 23rd)
Location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Title: Increasing the Piezoelectric Effect in Cement Paste.

Presenter: Benjamin Roskoskey, MS Civil Engineering Student Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Andrew Swartz).

Abstract: The object of this study is to attempt to increase the piezoelectric effect (and as a result the reverse piezoelectric effect) in cement paste. Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are frequently used nowadays to monitor the health of structures. However they are expensive and when embedded within concrete, can separate from the concrete and cause degradation due to differences between their Young’s modulus and thermal expansion coefficient and those of the concrete. The expectation is that the concrete itself, by utilizing its piezoelectric effect, can be used as the sole means of structural health monitoring for a structure.

Title: Enabling Sustainable and Natural Hazard Resistant Structures

Presenter: Joshua Cardinal , MS Civil Engineering Student Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Yue Li)

Abstract: Building construction consumes 40% of the raw stone, gravel, and sand used globally, and 25% of the virgin wood. Current research into sustainable design options for structures has become an increased topic for discussion. Natural hazard resistance is a significant part of the structural design requirements of a building, particularly in geographical locations where seismic hazards are prevalent. Sustainability can be identified in three key areas: economic, social, and environmental impact. The concept of sustainability has started to evolve from focusing on only one of the areas mentioned above to an integrated design method. This presentation will focus on researching the development of a new metric of design that encompasses all three areas to balance the deficiencies of each key area.

Structural design must be understood and approached holistically to generate the most viable option for all three areas of sustainability. This involves the coordination of all disciplines involved in the completion of a structure. By utilizing the metric presented, seismic structural analysis using ANSYS will be used to generate the maximum story drift, which will be used to estimate the damage and repair costs to the structure, as well as estimate a dollar amount associated with casualty losses. Environmental impact analysis will be performed using the program SimaPro through life-cycle analysis. To help validate structural and social losses, the FEMA program HAZUS will provide a comparison and validation for structural and social damage by geographic location.


Pavement Resurfacing Policy for Minimization of Life-cycle Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

SFHI Transportation presents:

Jeffrey Lidicker
Ph.D. Candidate, University of California, Berkeley

Thursday, February 16
10:00 AM
Rekhi G06

In recent decades pavement management optimization has been designed with the objective of minimizing user and agency costs.  However, recent analyses indicate that pavement management decisions also have significant impacts on life-cycle GHG emissions.  This study endeavors to expand beyond minimization of life-cycle costs, to also include GHG emissions.  We extend previous work on the single-facility, continuous-state, continuous-time optimal pavement resurfacing problem, to solve the multi-criteria optimization problem with the two objectives of minimizing costs and GHG emissions. Results indicate that there is a tradeoff between costs and emissions when developing a pavement resurfacing policy, providing a range of GHG emissions reduction cost-effectiveness options.  Case studies for an arterial and a major highway are presented to highlight the contrast between policy decisions for various pavement and vehicle technologies.


A Short History of Downtown Automated People Movers in U.S. Cities — An example of why technology alone cannot solve urban problems

Thursday, February 16, 2012
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Location: DOW 642
Speaker: William Leder, Adjunct Professor and Roland A. Mariucci Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

In the early 1970s many automated guideway transit technologies and concepts were emerging, and numerous applications were proposed. One of the urban transportation initiatives of that era was the Downtown People Mover (DPM) Program, sponsored by the U.S government, in which support in the form of grants was provided to demonstrate automated guideway transit as a circulation system in downtowns. These systems were envisioned as important transportation links that would help to reverse urban decay. This presentation will provide a history of the Downtown People Mover (DPM) Program, a description of and current status of the three DPM systems that were built, and lessons learned.

More information: Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar-Bill Leder


Railroad Engineering and Activities Club Meeting

The Railroad Engineering and Activities Club (REAC) will hold a business meeting from 6 to 7 p.m., Tuesday Feb 28, in Dow 875.

This Tuesday’s Rail Transportation Seminar presentation will be by Phil Pasterak, Sr. Vice President/Central Region Manager Rail & Transit for PB. The presentation title is:

“High Speed Rail Development in the US and Midwest”

REAC is open to members of any discipline who have an interest in finding out more about REAC activities and the rail industry.

Pizza and pop will be provided.

For more information, contact Pam Hannon, coordinator, MTTI, at 487-3065 or at prhannon@mtu.edu .