Tag: Fall 2011

The I 35W Bridge Collapse: A Design Error or a Lesson?

Our last Civil Engineering Seminar of this semester will be presented by Bill Kallman, P.E.. He is a retied bridge engineer from the NYDOT and he maintains a local consulting office in Hancock.

December 8, 2011 4:00 p.m. #642 Dow. Public welcome.

Presentation outline

  1. Pictures of Bridge Pre & Post-Collapse
  2. History of Preliminary Decisions, Materials and Design Specifications
  3. Film of Collapse From Security Camera
  4. FHWA Finite Element Analysis of Truss and Gussets, one of three
  5. Gusset U10 Analysis by Wiss Janey Elsner
  6. Order of Collapse
  7. Construction on Bridge
  8. MnDOT Inspections


The Michigan Cone Tests: A Reliability Study

Our Civil Engineering Seminar of this week will be presented by three
graduate students: Michael Hochscheidt, Karl Krueger, and Tony Oxley.
Public welcome.

Name

Karl Krueger

Advisor

Dr. Stanley J. Vitton

Abstract

The Michigan cone test is a compaction control test used to determine the maximum density of granular materials. This test has been used in Michigan as a field compaction test for over 50 years. However, the Proctor test is more often used as a method of compaction control in other states. Recently, the question has risen concerning the reliability of the cone test compared to methods used in other states.


Comparison of Three Methods for Driven Pile Capacity

Our Civil Engineering Seminar of this week will be presented by three
graduate students: Michael Hochscheidt, Karl Krueger, and Tony Oxley.
Public welcome.

Name

Tony Oxley

Adviser

Stan Vitton

Abstract

Several different methods for determining pile capacity are in use today. Three of these methods were evaluated to determine the accuracy of the predictions with regards to the actual capacity determined from testing. After analyzing the data the most accurate method for all soil types appeared to be the Army Corps method.


Cut Slope Design for the Access to an Underground Copper Mine

Our Civil Engineering Seminar of this week will be presented by three
graduate students: Michael Hochscheidt, Karl Krueger, and Tony Oxley.
Public welcome.

Name

Michael Hochscheidt

Advisor

Dr. Stanley J. Vitton

Abstract

Slope stability analysis is a major area of research in geotechnical engineering. That being said, very little is written in the geotechnical engineering literature on the design of box-cuts. The goal of this thesis will be to investigate the proper design of a box-cuts, and to design a box-cut for access to an underground copper mine. Issues that need to be considered in the box-cut design include, long term dewatering design, slope stability analysis, and erosion control.


Bond Strength between UHPC and Normal Strength Concrete (NSC) in accordance with Split Prism and Freeze-Thaw cycling tests

Civil Engineering CE 5990 Graduate Seminar
Three graduate students will present their research topics in our Civil
Engineering Seminar. This Thursday- 4-5PM 11/10/2011, Dow 642

Miguel Angel Carbonell

CEE Graduate Student

Abstract

The rehabilitation of concrete structures, particularly within transportation infrastructure network is a major challenge for transportation agencies in the United States. This is especially true for concrete bridge decks, which are often subjected to severe operating conditions, both environmental and man-made. Often, the most appropriate strategy to preserve or rehabilitate these structures is to provide some form of a protective coating or barrier.


Probabilistic Analysis via Aeroelasticity and System Identification on Wind Turbine Blades for Operational Structural Integrity Assessment

Civil Engineering CE 5990 Graduate Seminar
Three graduate students will present their research topics in our Civil
Engineering Seminar. This Thursday- 4-5PM 11/10/2011, Dow 642

Antonio Velazquez

Ph.D Student

Abstract

Wind energy is an increasingly important component of this nation’s renewable energy portfolio. Safe operation of wind turbine structures requires not only information regarding their condition, but their operational environment. Given the difficulty inherent in SHM processes and the stochastic nature of wind loads, a probabilistic framework is appropriate to characterize their risk of failure at a given time.


The Incorporation of Discontinuous Fibers into the Structural Design of Cementitious Materials: A Look at UHPC

Civil Engineering CE 5990 Graduate Seminar
Three graduate students will present their research topics in our Civil
Engineering Seminar. This Thursday- 4-5PM 11/10/2011, Dow 642

Eric L. Kreiger

Civil/Structural Engineering Master’s Student

Abstract

The use of fibers in cementitious materials has existed for several decades. However, their incorporation into structural design has been limited. In normal strength concrete their primary purpose is crack control, which leads to improved post cracking behavior. The fibers are considered secondary tensile reinforcement, overshadowed by the primary reinforcing bars.


Energy Harvesting and Storage: A View From Nanoscale

Civil Engineering CE 5990 Graduate Seminar

Thursday November 3, 4 pm, 641 Dow

Abstract

The demands for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of existing energy technologies have triggered worldwide research on advanced materials for energy storage and conversion. The present talk gives an overview on the PI’s current research on energy harvesting nanowires, Li-ion batteries, and PEM fuel cells.