Tag Archives: Spring 2012

Civil Engineering Seminar for March 29

Civil Engineering Seminarfor March 29:

Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (March. 29th)
location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Topic: Domain Microstructure Evolution and Magnetomechanical Property of Giant Magnetostrictive Materials

Presenter: Dr. Yongmei M. Jin, Assistant Professor, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Michigan Technological University

Bio: Dr. Jin received B.E. and M.E. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Science and Technology of China in 1994 and 1997, respectively, and Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Rutgers University in 2003. After two years of postdoctoral research at Rutgers University, she joined the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University in 2005 as an Assistant Professor and transferred to the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Michigan Tech in 2009. Her research interest focuses on materials modeling and computer simulation. In particular, she has been working on the development and application of phase field models to investigate microstructure evolutions in crystalline materials during various physical processes, e.g., martensitic transformation, decomposition, ordering, ferromagnetic domain switching, magnetomechanical behaviors, and defect evolutions (dislocations, cracks, voids, and free surfaces) in single- and poly-crystalline bulk and thin film materials and nanoparticles.

Abstract: Domain microstructure evolution and magnetomechanical property of giant magnetostrictive materials are investigated by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The model explicitly treats magnetic and elastic domain microstructures, accurately calculates various thermodynamic driving forces (magnetostatic, elastostatic, magnetocrystalline, exchange, chemical, interfacial, applied magnetic field, mechanical loading), simultaneously takes into account multiple physical mechanisms, and automatically describes the domain microstructure evolutions along kinetically favorable pathways without a priori constraint. In particular, coupled magnetic and elastic domain microstructure evolutions in magnetic shape memory alloys are simulated. The simulation results reveal the effects of external magnetic field, twin boundary mobility, and twinning strain on domain structure evolutions, which help explain peculiar magnetic field-induced strain behaviors observed in magnetic shape memory alloys. Application of phase-field modeling to the microstructure evolutions in other material processes are also discussed. Connections between mesoscale phase-field modeling, atomistic (first principles, molecular dynamics) and continuum (finite element) simulations, thermodynamic and kinetic databases as well as experiments are addressed.
PDF of Civil Engineering Seminarfor March 29:


Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar March 15th

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar March. 15th
Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (March. 15th)
location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Topics:

1. Integration of Mainshock-Aftershock Sequences Into Performance-Based Engineering
Presenter: Ruiqiang Song, Ph.D. Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Yue Li)

Abstract: During earthquake events, it is very common to observe many aftershocks following the mainshock. Although they are normally smaller in magnitude, aftershocks may have a large ground motion intensity, even longer duration and different energy content. Aftershocks have the potential to cause severe damage to buildings and threaten life safety even when only minor damage is present from the mainshock. However, most of current seismic risk assessment researches focus on risk due to a mainshock event only. The primary goal of this research is to systematically integrate aftershock seismic hazard into Performance Based Engineering through a combination of analytical studies with structural degradation models. In this study, the global-level hysteresis damage models is calibrated, structural Collapse Capacity subjected to Mainshock and aftershock sequence is carried out by performing incremental dynamic analysis, the effect of frequency content on structural collapse capacity are also checked and ground motion attenuation relationship of response spectral values are presented.

2. Building Information Modeling: A Demonstration of Parametric Modeling and its Use in the Construction Industry
Presenter: Christopher Brokaw, Master student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Amlan Mukherjee)

Abstract: Building information modeling (BIM) is a type of software that can be used to create a 3D model of a construction project that integrates information about the materials and scheduling. This makes it is possible to quickly explore multiple alternate designs and evaluate their performance, as well as plan out the entire project and management strategies. This allows for improved information management and project control when compared to projects designed with 2D drafting software. In this presentation, I will use a hands-on demonstration to explore BIM software and illustrate how stakeholders can use this software to streamline the design process, reduce conflicts, and save money. I will also present an overview of my ongoing research project that, in addition to the above, will explore the benefits of transitioning to BIM software, and will show some of the lessons learned from the early adopters.








Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: March 1

Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar:
Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (March. 1st)
location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Topics:

1. Application of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) as Thin-Bonded Overlay for Concrete Bridge Decks
Presenter: Sarah Shann, MS student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Devin Harris)

Abstract: As transportation infrastructure across the globe approaches the end of its service life, new innovative materials and applications are needed to sustainably repair and prevent damage to these structures. The feasibility of using Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) as a thin-bonded overlay on concrete bridge decks is investigated in this study. Design optimization of the bridge deck overlay system was examined to minimize overlay thickness, dead load, and cure time without sacrificing bond integrity or loss of protective capabilities. This was done with a 3-D finite element model of a simply supported bridge under a notional truck, the HL-93 design truck common to the United States, in the worst case loading position.

2. Title: Increasing the Piezoelectric Effect in Cement Paste.

Presenter: Benjamin Roskoskey, MS Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Andrew Swartz).

Abstract: The object of this study is to attempt to increase the piezoelectric effect (and as a result the reverse piezoelectric effect) in cement paste. Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are frequently used nowadays to monitor the health of structures. However they are expensive and when embedded within concrete, can separate from the concrete and cause degradation due to differences between their Young’s modulus and thermal expansion coefficient and those of the concrete. The expectation is that the concrete itself, by utilizing its piezoelectric effect, can be used as the sole means of structural health monitoring for a structure.


Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar: February 23

Civil Engineering Seminars:
Time: 4-5pm, Thursday (Feb. 23rd)
Location: Dow 642
Public welcome

Title: Increasing the Piezoelectric Effect in Cement Paste.

Presenter: Benjamin Roskoskey, MS Civil Engineering Student Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Andrew Swartz).

Abstract: The object of this study is to attempt to increase the piezoelectric effect (and as a result the reverse piezoelectric effect) in cement paste. Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are frequently used nowadays to monitor the health of structures. However they are expensive and when embedded within concrete, can separate from the concrete and cause degradation due to differences between their Young’s modulus and thermal expansion coefficient and those of the concrete. The expectation is that the concrete itself, by utilizing its piezoelectric effect, can be used as the sole means of structural health monitoring for a structure.

Title: Enabling Sustainable and Natural Hazard Resistant Structures

Presenter: Joshua Cardinal , MS Civil Engineering Student Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, (Adviser: Dr. Yue Li)

Abstract: Building construction consumes 40% of the raw stone, gravel, and sand used globally, and 25% of the virgin wood. Current research into sustainable design options for structures has become an increased topic for discussion. Natural hazard resistance is a significant part of the structural design requirements of a building, particularly in geographical locations where seismic hazards are prevalent. Sustainability can be identified in three key areas: economic, social, and environmental impact. The concept of sustainability has started to evolve from focusing on only one of the areas mentioned above to an integrated design method. This presentation will focus on researching the development of a new metric of design that encompasses all three areas to balance the deficiencies of each key area.

Structural design must be understood and approached holistically to generate the most viable option for all three areas of sustainability. This involves the coordination of all disciplines involved in the completion of a structure. By utilizing the metric presented, seismic structural analysis using ANSYS will be used to generate the maximum story drift, which will be used to estimate the damage and repair costs to the structure, as well as estimate a dollar amount associated with casualty losses. Environmental impact analysis will be performed using the program SimaPro through life-cycle analysis. To help validate structural and social losses, the FEMA program HAZUS will provide a comparison and validation for structural and social damage by geographic location.