Computer Science in Top 18 in Nation

homepage_clouds_lgPayScale, a compensation analysis web site, has announced the top 25 university computer science programs in the country and Michigan Tech placed 18th.

In its 2016-2017 College Salary Report, Payscale ranked 171 colleges and universities with computer science programs based on the median early-career and mid-career pay of the schools’ computer science alumni. Tech’s early-career computer science salaries are listed at $63,900. Mid-career median pay is $126,000.

“This is great news. It is the best indicator of the quality of our programs,” said Min Song, chair of Computer Science.

Stanford University ranked number one in the nation, with its computer science graduates reporting a median early-career salary of $99,500 and mid-career salary of $168,000. Read the full report.

By Jenn Donovan

Crowdsourced App Gauges Flood Waters

Top of Agate St, Houghton on the day of the flood.When flood waters rise, more data helps better predict and monitor changing conditions. And soon there will be an app for that.

The system is called the Integrated Flood Stage Observation Network (IFSON) and can take crowdsourced flood data, like smartphone photos, webcams and social media posts, then use image processing to assess flood stage and potential damage. Later versions of the app will use machine learning techniques. With those risks identified, IFSON can communicate flood information to first responders in real time. The platform will be adaptable for different neighborhoods and communities.

Read the full story on mtu.edu/news.


Dylan Gaines receives 3rd place in the ACM ASSETS 2018 Student Research Competition

Dylan Gaines, a Computer Science undergraduate, received 3rd place in the ACM ASSETS 2018 Student Research Competition.  Dylan presented a poster and a talk on his work on Tap123, an interface for entering text without visual feedback.  Tap123 offers the potential for faster and easier to learn text input for users who are visually impaired.  ASSETS is the premier venue for research on assistive technologies and accessible computing.

Congratulations Dylan!


Come find out why Grad School is for you!

Graduate Rekhi Hall Fall (2)School is for you!  Come find out why!  October 24th at 6:00 pm in Rekhi Hall Room G009.  Meet the professors, learn the logistics of Computer Science MS, PhD, and Accelerated Master’s Programs and find out about tuition incentives at MTU!  Refreshments will be served.  Hope to see you there!


CS Professor, Soner Onder, receives NSF award

Congratulations Soner! 

Dr. Soner Onder received one of seven awards from an NSF/Intel Partnership program titled:  Foundational Micro-architecture Research (FoMR): Dependent ILP: Dynamic Hoisting and Eager Scheduling of Dependent Instructions.

Soner Onder
Soner Onder

This is a collaborative proposal with Florida State University, with a total project value of $439,868 where Michigan Tech is the lead institution. This project aims to increase instruction-level parallelism (ILP).  ILP in computing allows different machine-level instructions within an application to execute in parallel within a micro-processor. Exploitation of ILP has provided significant performance benefits in computing, but there has been little improvement in ILP in recent years. This project proposes a new approach called “eager execution” that could significantly increase ILP. The success of many applications depends on how efficiently they can be executed. The proposed eager execution technique will benefit applications that span those running on mobile devices to large data applications running on the ever-growing number of data centers. Enabling better systems at all scales will further enable the ubiquitous computing that continues to pervade lives.

 


Sign Up for Computer Programming Lessons

Young students sitting at computersThe Department of Computer Science at Michigan Tech is offering local middle and high school students hands-on instruction in the basics of computer programming and computer science. Copper Country Coders meets each Saturday during the academic year from 1 to 3 p.m., starting this Saturday (Sept. 15) at Rekhi Hall, room 112.

Computer Science faculty and students will teach the fundamentals of programming, starting with simple languages like HTML and Scratch and progressing to the well-known and widely used Java language.

Beginning students use their new programming skills to create their own games and computer art. They also get exposure to physical applications of programming, such as mobile computing, microcontrollers and 3D printing.

We ask for a suggested donation of $60 to help pay for student teachers and computer access. To register or for more information, contact Charles Wallace, 7-3431.


Graduate School Announces Fall 2018 Award Recipients

Man WangWe are happy to announce grad student Man Wang is among the winners for the Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Award. Congratulations!

Finishing Fellowships provide support to PhD candidates who are close to completing their degrees. These fellowships are available through the generosity of alumni and friends of the University. They are intended to recognize outstanding PhD candidates who are in need of financial support to finish their degrees and are also contributing to the attainment of goals outlined in The Michigan Tech Plan.



On the Road

Timothy Havens

Tim Havens (ECE/CS) presented a paper entitled, “SPFI: Shape-Preserving Choquet Fuzzy Integral for Non-Normal Fuzzy Set-Valued Evidence,” this month at the IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence in Rio de Janeiro. Havens also co-authored two other papers presented at the conference. WCCI is the biennial meeting of the three leading computational intelligence conferences: International Conference on Fuzzy Systems, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, and Congress on Evolutionary Computation. Co-authors on the paper were Tony Pinar (ECE), Derek Anderson (U. Missouri) and Christian Wagner (U. Nottingham, UK). As general chair of the Int. Conf. Fuzzy Systems 2019 in New Orleans, Havens also presented a pitch for the upcoming event at the WCCI awards banquet.

Additionally, Havens presented an invited seminar, “How to Win on Trivia Night: Sensor Fusion Beyond the Weighted Average,” at MIT Lincoln Laboratory on July 16.


Code Ninjas Rescheduled, Registration Open

The Code Ninjas Workshop, originally scheduled for June 18-23, was rescheduled due to this month’s flooding. New dates have been scheduled and registration is now open.

The Code Ninjas Workshop for middle school girls is July 16 – 21. Code Ninjas is for girls interested in programming computers, making websites and helping everyone use technology. Presenting the workshop are Sarah Larkin-Driscoll, a second-year student and Miriam Eikenberry-Ureel, an incoming freshman. Both are from the Computer Science Department.

Are you interested in web design? Building smartphone apps? Programming a video game? Do you wonder what it might be like to be color-blind? What about someone who can’t comfortably tap on an iPhone? How can computers help a speech-impaired person talk?

Join us for a week-long workshop where girls in grades 6 – 9 explore, design and program web pages and apps for special needs groups. They’ll make a web page with special settings for color-blind users. Explore using a mobile device from an elderly person’s point of view. Program a video game and then make custom controls. Make a web-based game with custom links and resizable text. Learn about careers in game development, web design and usability testing. Meet other girls interested in computing. Tour a research lab where people use computers to create better lives.

Workshop Dates:

  • Noon to 3:30 p.m. July 16—Web Design Basics
  • Noon to 3:30 p.m. July 17—Web Design for the Visually Impaired
  • Noon to 3:30 p.m. July 18—Web Design for Mobile Devices
  • Noon to 3:30 p.m. July 19—Game design for special needs
  • Noon to 3:30 p.m. July 20—Make a game controller
  • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 21—Design a program of your choice

The workshops are located in Rekhi Hall 112. Space is limited, so register for this free workshop by Monday, July 9. No prior programming experience is necessary. Questions? Contact aspire-l@mtu.edu .

This workshop is sponsored by an AspireIT grant from the National Center for Women & Information Technology and facilitated by the Michigan Tech Computer Science Department.


Code Ninjas Programming Workshop for Middle School Girls

The Code Ninjas Workshop for middle school girls is June 18 – 23. Code Ninjas is for girls interested in programming computers, making websites and helping everyone use technology.

Presenting the workshop are Sarah Larkin-Driscoll, a second-year student and Miriam Eikenberry-Ureel, an incoming freshman. Both are from the Computer Science Department.

Are you interested in web design? Building smartphone apps? Programming a video game? Do you wonder what it might be like to be color-blind? What about someone who can’t comfortably tap on an iPhone? How can computers help a speech-impaired person talk?

Join us for a week-long workshop where girls grades 6 – 9 explore, design and program web pages and apps for special needs groups.

Make a web page with special settings for color-blind users. Explore using a mobile device from an elderly person’s point of view. Program a video game and then make your own custom controls. Make a web-based game with custom links and resizable text. Learn about careers in game development, web design and usability testing. Meet other girls interested in computing. Tour a research lab where people use computers to create better lives.

Workshop Dates:

  • June 18: noon – 3:30 p.m. Web Design Basics
  • June 19: noon – 3:30 p.m.  Web Design for the Visually Impaired
  • June 20: noon – 3:30 p.m. Web Design for Mobile Devices
  • June 21: noon – 3:30 p.m. Game design for special needs
  • June 22: noon – 3:30 p.m. Make a game controller
  • June 23: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Design a program of your choice

These workshops are located in Rekhi Hall, room 112. Space is limited, so register for this free workshop by Sunday ( June 10). No prior programming experience is necessary. Questions? Contact aspire-l@mtu.edu

This workshop is sponsored by an AspireIT grant from the National Center for Women & Information Technology and facilitated by the Michigan Technological University Computer Science Department.