Archives—February 2019

Two new grants in one month, way to go, Robert!

Congratulations to Robert Pastel for his new grant of $116,561 as a part of a collaborative NSF project, titled “Collaborative Research: MSB-FRA: Scaling Climate, Connectivity and Communities in Streams project”. This is a $1.4 million grant that involves Oklahoma University,  University of Arizona, University Louisiana at Lafayette, Virginia Tech, Northern Arizona University, University of California at Berkeley, and Michigan Tech. The project studies the ecology of intermittent streams as they dry. Northern Arizona University and Michigan Tech will develop smartphone applications for mapping wet and dry stream reaches for researchers and citizen scientists.
Two new grants in a month, way to go, Robert!

Robert Pastel receives a new NSF grant of $61,760 for the project titled: “SCC: Community-Based Automated Information for Urban Flooding”

Robert Pastel is a Co-Principal Investigator on this NSF grant led by Arizona State University (ASU).  The project is titled, “SCC: Community-Based Automated Information for Urban Flooding” and the abstract is as follows:  Flooding is the most damaging natural hazard in the U.S. and around the world, and most flood damage occurs in cities. Yet the ability to know when flooding is happening and communicate that risk to the public and first responders is limited. At the same time there is a surge in digitally connected technologies, many at the fingertips of the general public (e.g., smartphones). The need is for new flood information that can be generated from primary observations that are collected in exactly the right places and times to be coupled with the ability to more effectively communicate this risk to communities. This project will develop the Integrated Flood Stage Observation Network (IFSON), a system that can take in crowd-sourced information on flooding (from cameras, a smartphone app, and social media), intelligently assess flood risk (using machine learning), and communicate those risks in real time. IFSON will be scalable to any community or city and will provide a backbone for new crowd-sourced technologies.

This project will i) integrate several new technologies (each that directly engages with different communities) to provide new insights into and communication capacity around urban flooding hazards, ii) connect a range of communities to each other in near-realtime (from the general public to first responders to infrastructure managers) and develop flood sensing and avoidance capacities that can be used anywhere in the U.S. or even internationally, iii) develop new insights into how urban morphology contributes to flood risk, and iv) leverage prior funding by connecting practitioners from existing sustainability research networks and sending data to CUAHSI and eRams. Additionally, this research will develop outreach activities that will educate the public and practitioners on how flooding hazards occur, their impacts, and how to mitigate risks. The research will directly empower and engage local citizens in flood event reporting and response, and explores a concrete model for what it would mean to have a “smart and connected community” for minimizing flood risk. Although driven by a number of novel technologies and techniques, the central focus of this work is on the interface of community with technology and, in particular, how modern network technologies can engage and bring together ordinary citizens, city planners, first responders, and other local stakeholders within a shared, collaboratively constructed information space; a broad range of educational and outreach opportunities are included to engage stakeholders and amplify project impact. In addition to training students through research positions, the project will create a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. It will also connect with national, state, and local societies across a number of disciplines. For example, the project will work with the City of Phoenix during their Monsoon Preparedness day to educate first responders on how to use project results. Interdisciplinary course modules that show how to engage various communities (including the public, first responders, and infrastructure managers) in mitigating flood risk will be developed and disseminated. Additionally, infrastructure managers will be recruited to participate in workshops on how project data will reveal new insights into the condition of infrastructure and what strategies can be employed to reduce hazards.

This award reflects NSF’s statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation’s intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

Congratulations Robert!