Category Archives: Achievements and Awards

Two new grants in one month, way to go, Robert!

Congratulations to Robert Pastel for his new grant of $116,561 as a part of a collaborative NSF project, titled “Collaborative Research: MSB-FRA: Scaling Climate, Connectivity and Communities in Streams project”. This is a $1.4 million grant that involves Oklahoma University,  University of Arizona, University Louisiana at Lafayette, Virginia Tech, Northern Arizona University, University of California at Berkeley, and Michigan Tech. The project studies the ecology of intermittent streams as they dry. Northern Arizona University and Michigan Tech will develop smartphone applications for mapping wet and dry stream reaches for researchers and citizen scientists.
Two new grants in a month, way to go, Robert!

Robert Pastel receives a new NSF grant of $61,760 for the project titled: “SCC: Community-Based Automated Information for Urban Flooding”

Robert Pastel is a Co-Principal Investigator on this NSF grant led by Arizona State University (ASU).  The project is titled, “SCC: Community-Based Automated Information for Urban Flooding” and the abstract is as follows:  Flooding is the most damaging natural hazard in the U.S. and around the world, and most flood damage occurs in cities. Yet the ability to know when flooding is happening and communicate that risk to the public and first responders is limited. At the same time there is a surge in digitally connected technologies, many at the fingertips of the general public (e.g., smartphones). The need is for new flood information that can be generated from primary observations that are collected in exactly the right places and times to be coupled with the ability to more effectively communicate this risk to communities. This project will develop the Integrated Flood Stage Observation Network (IFSON), a system that can take in crowd-sourced information on flooding (from cameras, a smartphone app, and social media), intelligently assess flood risk (using machine learning), and communicate those risks in real time. IFSON will be scalable to any community or city and will provide a backbone for new crowd-sourced technologies.

This project will i) integrate several new technologies (each that directly engages with different communities) to provide new insights into and communication capacity around urban flooding hazards, ii) connect a range of communities to each other in near-realtime (from the general public to first responders to infrastructure managers) and develop flood sensing and avoidance capacities that can be used anywhere in the U.S. or even internationally, iii) develop new insights into how urban morphology contributes to flood risk, and iv) leverage prior funding by connecting practitioners from existing sustainability research networks and sending data to CUAHSI and eRams. Additionally, this research will develop outreach activities that will educate the public and practitioners on how flooding hazards occur, their impacts, and how to mitigate risks. The research will directly empower and engage local citizens in flood event reporting and response, and explores a concrete model for what it would mean to have a “smart and connected community” for minimizing flood risk. Although driven by a number of novel technologies and techniques, the central focus of this work is on the interface of community with technology and, in particular, how modern network technologies can engage and bring together ordinary citizens, city planners, first responders, and other local stakeholders within a shared, collaboratively constructed information space; a broad range of educational and outreach opportunities are included to engage stakeholders and amplify project impact. In addition to training students through research positions, the project will create a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. It will also connect with national, state, and local societies across a number of disciplines. For example, the project will work with the City of Phoenix during their Monsoon Preparedness day to educate first responders on how to use project results. Interdisciplinary course modules that show how to engage various communities (including the public, first responders, and infrastructure managers) in mitigating flood risk will be developed and disseminated. Additionally, infrastructure managers will be recruited to participate in workshops on how project data will reveal new insights into the condition of infrastructure and what strategies can be employed to reduce hazards.

This award reflects NSF’s statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation’s intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

Congratulations Robert!

 

 


The 2018 NCL Cyber Competition Results Are In…

In Fall 2018, Alex Larkin has a great achievement in NCL Cyber Competition Regular Season. His national rank is 17th out of 3324 participant, a great jump from 36th in Spring 2018. In addition,  our NCL team (“Michigan Tech Hackers”) ranked 81 out of 360 teams in NCL Cyber Competition Postseason.  It was the first time we have a team involved in this competition and our team did an excellent job as a starting point. The team consists of three CS undergraduate students, Alexander Larkin, Jon Preuth, and Jack Bergman. Bo Chen, CS Assistant Professor, is the faculty coach.
The NCL was founded in May 2011 to provide an ongoing virtual training ground for collegiate students to develop, practice, and validate their cybersecurity skills. It is a defensive and offensive puzzle-based, capture-the-flag style cybersecurity competition. Its virtual training ground helps high school and college students prepare and test themselves against cybersecurity challenges that they will likely face in the workforce. All participants play the games simultaneously during Preseason, Regular Season and Postseason.
Excellent work!

$35K Gift from Google to Computer Science!

The Department of Computer Science, supported by a gift from Google, will hold a 3-day workshop to introduce female undergraduate students with an interest in computer science, to research experiences, provide them with information about graduate school, and provide them with an opportunity to interact with current graduate students.  The department has a long history of working to increase the enrollment of women in our undergraduate program,  This workshop expands those concerted efforts to our graduate program.  Special thanks to Google and the CS faculty Laura Brown, Jean Mayo, Linda Ott, and Leo Ureel.  The workshop will be held on the weekend of April 6 at Michigan Technological University in Houghton.

Dylan Gaines receives 3rd place in the ACM ASSETS 2018 Student Research Competition

Dylan Gaines, a Computer Science undergraduate, received 3rd place in the ACM ASSETS 2018 Student Research Competition.  Dylan presented a poster and a talk on his work on Tap123, an interface for entering text without visual feedback.  Tap123 offers the potential for faster and easier to learn text input for users who are visually impaired.  ASSETS is the premier venue for research on assistive technologies and accessible computing.

Congratulations Dylan!


CS Professor, Soner Onder, receives NSF award

Congratulations Soner! 

Dr. Soner Onder received one of seven awards from an NSF/Intel Partnership program titled:  Foundational Micro-architecture Research (FoMR): Dependent ILP: Dynamic Hoisting and Eager Scheduling of Dependent Instructions.

Soner Onder
Soner Onder

This is a collaborative proposal with Florida State University, with a total project value of $439,868 where Michigan Tech is the lead institution. This project aims to increase instruction-level parallelism (ILP).  ILP in computing allows different machine-level instructions within an application to execute in parallel within a micro-processor. Exploitation of ILP has provided significant performance benefits in computing, but there has been little improvement in ILP in recent years. This project proposes a new approach called “eager execution” that could significantly increase ILP. The success of many applications depends on how efficiently they can be executed. The proposed eager execution technique will benefit applications that span those running on mobile devices to large data applications running on the ever-growing number of data centers. Enabling better systems at all scales will further enable the ubiquitous computing that continues to pervade lives.

 


Graduate School Announces Fall 2018 Award Recipients

Man WangWe are happy to announce grad student Man Wang is among the winners for the Doctoral Finishing Fellowship Award. Congratulations!

Finishing Fellowships provide support to PhD candidates who are close to completing their degrees. These fellowships are available through the generosity of alumni and friends of the University. They are intended to recognize outstanding PhD candidates who are in need of financial support to finish their degrees and are also contributing to the attainment of goals outlined in The Michigan Tech Plan.


Two CS Instructors Receive Exceptional Scores

Keith Vertanen and Bo Chen have been identified as two of only 89 instructors who received an exceptional “Average of 7 dimensions” student evaluation score during Spring 2018. Their scores (Keith: 4.62 with an enrollment of 98; Bo: 4.79 with an enrollment of 9) are in the top 10% of similarly sized sections across all courses/sections on campus. These excellent student evaluations reflect the tremendous efforts that Keith and Bo have put on their teaching.
Congratulations Keith and Bo. Please keep up the good work!


Alex Larkin, CS undergrad, achieves a national NCL ranking

FB_IMG_1525454724440Alex Larkin. Computer Science undergrad. Outstanding achievement.

Alex placed 36th out of 3,350 students/players in the 2018 National Cyber League (NCL) cyber competition!  CS Assistant Professor, Bo Chen, is the faculty coach.

The NCL was founded in May 2011 to provide an ongoing virtual training ground for collegiate students to develop, practice, and validate their cybersecurity skills. It is a defensive and offensive puzzle-based, capture-the-flag style cybersecurity competition. Its virtual training ground helps high school and college students prepare and test themselves against cybersecurity challenges that they will likely face in the workforce. All participants play the games simultaneously during Preseason, Regular Season and Postseason.

Way to go Alex!