Category Archives: Achievements and Awards

CS Students develop new healthy eating app

Congratulations to Kyle Ludwig and CS graduate student Chetan Chaurasiya on creating a new app to help healthy eating habits.

A locally developed app which tracks eating habits and recommends healthy meals will soon be hitting the market.  Please read the full story from the Daily Mining Gazette here http://www.mininggazette.com/news/2018/01/new-eating-app-developed-by-tech-student-graduate/

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Alexander Larkin places 101 out of 3,449 in the National Cyber League (NCL)

My name is Alexander Larkin and I am currently finishing up my first semester, at Michigan Tech, as a Computer Science major.  I transferred from Waukesha County Technical College, WI where I spent a few years studying networking, programming, and cybersecurity.  During my first semester, at Michigan Tech, I competed in the NCL(National Cyber League) and placed 101st out of 3,449 competitors.  NCL is a cybersecurity competition that assesses an individual’s skill in cryptography, network traffic analysis, task automation, exploitation of vulnerable systems, and much more.  Participating in NCL is an incredible way to learn about cybersecurity concepts and is an absolutely great experience.  I began competing in NCL when I was sixteen years old.  I have continued to compete in most NCL games since that time and I always look forward to the next competition.  The competition gives a competitor a set of tasks to complete, via a clean and intuitive web interface.  For every task completed, points are given based on the difficulty of the task.  Sometimes the competition demands an individual learn about some strange technologies such as Voice-Over-IP.  During this last competition, I found myself researching how Voice-Over-IP works, so I could track phone calls, stored in a packet capture.  Every time I compete in NCL I find myself learning about cool technologies.  Over the years, I have learned how to become a master at the art of “Google-Fu”.  Over the years of competing, I have learned just how important it is to do research on unknown topics and technologies.  NCL also taught me that it is OK to not know something and to not admit defeat, but to do some research, learn the topic, and apply what I learn on the fly.  Learning how to “learn on the fly” has helped me immensely in all aspects of my life and is enormously valuable in Computer Science.  I would consider it to be a pseudo-required skill to possess in the dynamic world of computing.  I am happy to be competing in National Cyber League here at Michigan Tech and I am looking forward to competing in the Spring of 2018.  Additional information about National Cyber League can be found at www.nationalcyberleague.org.  I would like to personally thank Professor Min Song and Professor Bo Chen for providing faculty leadership during this last competition and I look forward to working with them again in the Spring.

Congratulations Alexander!




Associate Professor, Jeon, Receives Korea Automobile Testing and Research Institute Grant

MyounghoonJeon20140131_0001Philart’s grant is a 4-year award with a total budget of $350,000 from Korea Automobile Testing & Research Institute. Two graduate students will be supported by this grant each year. The project is titled “Development of the safety assessment technique for take‐over in automated vehicles.”

The goal of the project is to design and evaluate intelligent auditory interactions for improving safety and user experience in the automated vehicles. Research tasks include developing a driving simulator for automated driving model, modelling driver states in automated vehicles, design and evaluating discrete auditory alerts for safety purpose, and the development of real-time sonification systems for overall user experience. Congratulations Philart!

 


CS Assistant Professor, Jianhui Yue, Receives an NSF Award

Jianhui YueJianhui Yue’s grant is a 3-year NSF award with a total budget of $176,876. One PhD student will be supported for two years.  The project is titled “Improving Reliability of In-Memory Storage”. The project addresses two challenges of in-memory storage: 1) Memory cells have limited write endurance (i.e., the total number of program/erase cycles per cell), and 2) Nonvolatile memory has to remain in a consistent state in the event of a system crash or power loss.
This project will take a holistic approach, spanning from low-level architecture design to high-level OS management, to optimize the reliability, performance, and manageability of in-memory storage.
Congratulations!

James Roznick receives the Department of Defense SMART Scholarship

Congratulations to Jimmy Roznick!  Jimmy is the recipient of the DOD SMART Scholarship.  “The SMART scholarship is a Department of Defense scholarship for service program aimed at supporting students in STEM fields. The scholarship covers the full cost of tuition and provides students with a monthly stipend. In return, students intern and work at a sponsoring facility for a number of years, equal to the amount of schooling sponsored.  I am very excited to be putting what I’ve learned at Michigan Tech to use for national security purposes.”, Jimmy said.  He will soon be graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Software Engineering as well as pursuing a master’s in CS.

Congrats!


Keith Vertanen Receives Exceptional Instructor Evaluation Score

image124044-persCongratulations to Keith Vertanen for having been identified as one of only 71 instructors who received an exceptional “Average of 7 Dimensions” student evaluation score during Spring semester 2017. Keith’s score is 4.53 with an enrollment of 105. Keith received the same recognition in Spring 2016 with a score of 4.49 with an enrollment of 85.

Congratulations Keith!  Please keep up the good work!


MIT Lincoln Laboratory contract for Tim Havens

Timothy Havens
Timothy Havens

Associate Professor Tim Havens received a $15,000 contract from MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Tim and his team will investigate signal processing for active phased array systems with simultaneous transmit and receive capability. While this capability offers increased performance in communications, radar, and electronic warfare applications, the challenging aspect is that a high-level of isolation must be achieved between the transmit and receive antennas in order to mitigate self-interference in the array. This is a half-year project. Timothy Schulz at ECE is the co-PI of the project. Excellent work Tim!