Author: ehgroth

Seminar: Instrumenting the Human Body

sep22Seminar presentation jointly sponsored by Michigan Technological University’s College of Engineering and the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering
Date: Monday, September 22, 2014; Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m.; Location: M&M U115
Title: Instrumenting the Human Body
Richard B. Brown, Ph.D., Dean of Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City

Abstract: Advances in semiconductor technology are enabling research into, and treatment of, many human diseases. Prof. Brown will present a highly‐integrated, low‐power, wireless, mixed-signal microprocessor that was designed for implantable biomedical applications, and braincomputer interfaces that enable researchers to monitor electrical firing of individual neurons, local field potentials, and chemical signaling in the brain.

Biography: Prof. Brown earned the degrees BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from Brigham Young University. After working in industry for six years, he returned to school at the University of Utah and received the degree PhD in EE in 1985, developing one of the first “smart sensors,” an array of liquid chemical sensors with integrated electronics. Upon graduation, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he developed their VLSI program and conducted research on circuits (high‐speed, low‐power, high‐temperature, and radiation hard), microprocessors (high‐performance, low‐power, and mixed‐signal), sensors (for ions, heavy metals, and neurotransmitters), and brain‐machine interfaces. At Michigan he held an Arthur F. Thurnau Endowed Professorship. In 2004, he was appointed Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Utah, where he has continued to do research on circuits, mixed-signal microcontrollers and neural interfaces. Prof. Brown has been a founder with his students of Mobius Microsystems (all‐silicon clock generators), i‐SENS (glucose sensors), Sensicore (water chemistry sensors), and e‐SENS (chemical sensors). He holds 17 patents, has authored more than 225 peer‐reviewed publications, and graduated 30 PhD students.

Richard B. Brown, Ph.D., Dean of Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City presented a seminar at Michigan  Title: Instrumenting the Human Body; Shown here 2nd from left with Michigan Tech faculty, Paul Bergstrom, ECE Chair Daniel Fuhrmann and Saeid Nooshabadi
Richard B. Brown, Ph.D., Dean of Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City presented a seminar at Michigan Title: Instrumenting the Human Body; Shown here 2nd from left with Michigan Tech faculty, Paul Bergstrom, ECE Chair Daniel Fuhrmann and Saeid Nooshabadi

Shiyan Hu to Attend NAE Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Shiyan Hu to Attend NAE Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Associate Professor Shiyan Hu (ECE) has been invited to attend the National Academy of Engineering’s EU-US Frontiers of Engineering Symposium.

He is among only 62 researchers from the European Union and the United States to receive an invitation to the symposium, to be held Nov. 10-12 in Seattle.

The symposium brings together outstanding, early-career engineers from industry, universities and other research institutions to introduce their research and work toward forming partnerships and collaborations.

The attendees are under age 45 and may only be nominated by NAE members or senior executives from leading industrial companies.

The symposium will feature presentations on Energy Storage Across Scales, Protein Design for Therapeutic Applications, Smart Homes, and Atoms to Airplanes: Designer/Engineered Aerospace Materials. Hu’s research addresses cybersecurity in smart homes, and he recently received a CAREER award for his efforts to design faster computer chips.

The event is hosted in partnership with the European Council of Academies of Applied Sciences, Technologies and Engineering and the National Academy of Technologies of France.


Zhuo Feng Gets CAREER Award to Develop New Tools for Nanoscale Computer Chip Design

Back in the day, actual human beings wired computer circuitry by hand. Then along came integrated circuits, and now the technology is so advanced that tens of billions of transistors can be put on a single chip no bigger than a dime. The complexity of these nanoscale integrated circuits makes it difficult to make the most of their design, says Zhuo Feng, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan Technological University. That’s because software used to design computer chips hasn’t kept pace with the hardware in these emerging computing systems.
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Michigan Tech Students Head to Detroit for Alternative Spring Break

Students from the Michigan Tech National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) visited seven middle and high schools in Detroit over their Spring Break, March 11-14, 2014, to promote college and engineering to K-12 students. Two ECE students were in the team, Sam Adegun and Darlene Eppes. In the evenings, they conducted Family Engineering Night events at three K-8 schools. NSBE’s Alternative Spring Break is conducted in collaboration with the Detroit Public Schools Office of Science and the Detroit Math & Science Center, and funded in part, with a grant from John Deere.

WXYZ Channel 7 news in Detroit aired a feature story about an interview with Michigan Tech NSBE student chapter members in Detroit, working to motivate middle and high school students in Detroit schools to see college in their futures and to study science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

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Michigan Tech NSBE students Family Engineering session at classroom in Detroit shown here in a photo from 2014

First Place Award for Graduate Poster to Kaitlyn Bunker

Kaitlyn Bunker, Electrical and Computer Engineering, First Place, Posters, presented by Howard Haselhuhn of GSG, High Dimension Droop Control for Wind Resources in DC Microgrids

The main events of this symposium were a Poster Presentation Session and a Research Colloquium sponsored
by the Graduate Student Government

There is a report for the Graduate Research Colloquium 2014 with photos and awards.

Kaitlyn Bunker, Electrical and Computer Engineering, First Place, Posters, presented by Howard Haselhuhn of GSG, High Dimension Droop Control for Wind Resources in DC Microgrids

Space Solar Power Workshop a Success

Michigan Technological University, in collaboration with professionals from NASA, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Space Solar Power Institute, hosted a Space Solar Power (SSP) workshop to clarify the challenges facing SSP implementation. The workshop was held in conjunction with the IEEE International Conference on Wireless for Space and Extreme Environments at Baltimore, MD, November 7 – 9, 2013. Researchers from Industry and Academia of many countries including India, Japan, UK and USA participated in this event.