Tag: GMES

Stories about Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences.

STEM Outreach During Fall 2016 at Michigan Tech

Brimley Area School Students Visit Michigan Tech

Thirty middle-school students, plus two science teachers, and two chaperones from Brimley Area Schools visited Michigan Tech and the Keweenaw Peninsula from Sept. 28-30, 2016. The outreach event was hosted by Ted Bornhorst, Executive Director, A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum, and Joan Chadde, Director of the Center for Science & Environmental Outreach. The Brimley Area Schools student population is 54 % Native American and 51 % low income. Students participated in a half-day of STEM activities on campus with Brian Barkdoll and “Kiko” de Melo e Silva, faculty and research scientist, respectively, in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Dr. Sarah Sun in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics.

“We were pleased to provide this unique opportunity for the Brimley students that may spark their interest to pursue a STEM degree at Michigan Tech,” explained Bornhorst.

“This was a great group of students,” observed Chadde. “We plan to work with them to make this an annual visit.”

Brian Barkdoll and Brimley Area Schools Students
Brian Barkdoll and Brimley Area Schools Students
Kiko de Melo e Silva and Brimley Area School Students
Kiko de Melo e Silva and Brimley Area School Students
Sarah Sun and Brimley Area School Students
Sarah Sun and Brimley Area School Students

SIS & SAAM Hold Annual Meeting

The students of SIS (Society of Intellectual Sisters) and SAAM (Society of African American Men) alumni participated in several STEM activities just like their parents did at Tech! Joan Chadde facilitated several Family Engineering activities for the students, who ranged in age from 3-17 years. A favorite activity is the “Hot Chocolate Machine where students stack 10-15 cups to let gravity do its thing and mix the milk power and cocoa powder—and Voila! Hot chocolate!”

Hot Chocolate at SIS and SAAM Meeting
Hot Chocolate at SIS and SAAM Meeting

Information Session on BS in Engineering Management

Engineering ManagementConsider attending the information session on the bachelor of science degree in engineering management. This is a new major at Michigan Tech.

  • Great degree for those who have an interest in both the technical and business sides of a company
  • Option for primary or dual degree (ME-EM, CEE, MSE and others with approximately 33-42 credits more)
  • Fastest growing major in the School of Business and Economics
  •  Increased interest by employers coming to the Career Fair
  • Participate to learn more about the BSEM even if you have declared it as a major

The session is at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, in Academic Offices Building room 101.

Contact Dana Johnson or Jodie Filpus-Paakola with questions.

By Dana Johnson, School of Business and Economics.

First-Year Engineering Lecture Fall 2016: Susan B. Kiehl

First year engineering students attended a lecture on September 13, 2016, in the Rozsa Center for the Performing Arts. This year’s speaker was Susan B. Kiehl, Vice President of Product Development, Integrated Fighter Group, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.

Her talk was entitled Future Smart or “Oh the Places You’ll Go!” The talk was introduced by Jon Sticklen, Chair, Engineering Fundamentals, and Wayne D. Pennington, Dean, College of Engineering. There was a reception for Susan B. Kiehl.

On Friday, September 23, Susan Kiehl had a wrap up session with the first year students.

VIEW THE PHOTO GALLERY

Susan B. Kiehl
Susan B. Kiehl
Future Smart
Future Smart
Attendees at the Rozsa Center
Attendees at the Rozsa Center
Questions After the Lecture
Questions After the Lecture
Reception for Susan B. Kiehl
Reception for Susan B. Kiehl
Wrap Up Session
Wrap Up Session

Ford to Donate $61,000 to Pre-College Outreach STEM Programs

The Michigan Tech community is invited to attend a check presentation at 4 p.m. tomorrow (Sept. 21, 2016) at Husky Plaza. Cynthia Protas Hodges, an ’87 mechanical engineering alumna who is now chassis supplier technical assistance site manager at Ford, will present a $61,000 check from Ford to support STEM programs in the Center for Pre-College Outreach.

The gift from Ford will fund youth programs designed to engage young women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Programs include Materials Science & Engineering Summer Youth Program, Engineering Scholars Program, Junior Women in Engineering Program, Mind Trekkers, Southeast Michigan Science & Engineering Festival, and Women in Engineering Program.

From Tech Today, by Jim Desrochers, Office of Innovation and Industry Engagement.

Unscripted Geoheritage: More than a Boulder

Geoheritage BoulderThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient and full of history. Most are more than one billion years old and hold one of the world’s few native copper deposits. In their guest blog, part of a series on local geoheritage, Erika Vye and Bill Rose explain the importance of a single Copper Country boulder.

The North Houghton County Sewage Authority hit a boulder during work south of Calumet. The boulder is large—nearly seven feet across—but that’s not what makes it unusual. The rock type is a rare sight at the surface and is chock full of copper. The rock is part of the Calumet and Hecla Conglomerate, a formation considered the mother lode of the Keweenaw Peninsula, and represents an important part of the region’s history.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research by Bill Rose and Erika Vye.

Unscripted Geoheritage: Stamping Through History

Stamp SandsThe rocks of the Keweenaw Peninsula are ancient: More than one billion years old, containing loads of native copper deposits. Mining them created a legacy seen throughout the region.

The nation’s first big mining boom certainly left its mark on the peninsula. It left icons like the Quincy Mine Hoist; it left massive deposits of mine waste, a fine material called stamp sands, outside Gay; it left a few problems, like a Superfund site in and around Torch Lake. As rich as the copper that people once mined here, the history of the Keweenaw is full of stories, insight, dilemmas, and opportunities. Call it geoheritage.

As part of ongoing geoheritage education, the annual Geotours are an effort to bring the earth processes and cultural legacy of the land to light. The program is run by Bill Rose, a professor emeritus of geology at Michigan Tech, and Erika Vye, a recent PhD graduate of the geology program. On Thursday, July 28, they took a boatload of people to the eastern side of the peninsula for an up-close and personal view of the Keweenaw’s industrial mining legacy.

Read more at Unscripted: Science and Research, by Allison Mills.

College of Engineering Named a Best Value School

Energy Day
Panel Discussion with Industry: Energy Day at Michigan Tech CareerFEST 2015

A web site called Best College Values has named 50 schools nationwide whose bachelor’s degree programs in engineering offer the best value education for their cost. Michigan Tech’s College of Engineering placed 24th on the list.

Best College Values calls itself an online resource for prospective college students who are seeking an education that is worth its cost. Programs chosen for this ranking must be of reputably high quality and affordable, providing a high return on investment.

“Michigan Tech carries above-average scores in each of our value ranking categories, which earns it its place as a top value Bachelor in Engineering school,” the web site says.

“It is encouraging to see our College of Engineering recognized by this established ranking system,” says Wayne Pennington, dean of Tech’s College of Engineering. “We know that our students perform extremely well in the job market and graduate studies, and this is reflected in the methodology that is employed for these rankings. Simply put, our students get good jobs that quickly repay their investment in their education. We are proud of that fact and continually strive to ensure that students are provided great value through sound, hands-on learning and the opportunity to participate at a meaningful level in a variety of projects as part of their Michigan Tech experience.”

The Best College Values web site explains the thinking behind its rankings: “While we believe that U.S. News and similar publications’ college rankings are valuable indicators of schools’ academic performance and reputations, we also believe that for the average prospective student seeking an education that will prepare them to enter the workforce, a number of other factors ought to be considered more heavily. Best College Values is thus dedicated to producing rankings built on composite scores based on affordability, financial outcomes after graduation and institutional reputation.”

See the rankings of the 50 schools here.

From Tech Today, by Jenn Donovan.

Michigan Tech Quoted on Earthquake in Chile

The Guardian Liberty Voice, an online newspaper, published an article about an earthquake that hit the coast of Chile on Monday, quoting Michigan Tech earthquake experts.

From Tech Today.

Earthquake Rocks Coastal Chile

In heavily populated areas, these magnitude earthquakes can cause extensive damage. According to Michigan Tech University, tremblors of a magnitude 6 or higher, occur about 100 times each year, throughout the world.

Read more at the Guardian Liberty Voice, by Bob Reinhard.

Carnegie Museum to Host Guided Tours

Hockey ArenaFour Michigan Tech Professors will act as guides during three upcoming guided tours highlighting the history of the Keweenaw.

The tours are sponsored by Houghton’s Carnegie Museum, and begin with a wine and cheese social at the museum at 5 p.m. Following the social, participants will board the Red Jacket Trolley Company’s bus for a two-hour trip through time.

The first guided tour “Torch Lake Mining Waste,” is tomorrow (July 13). Geologists Bill Rose (GMES) and Erika Vye are the guides through a tour along the industrial corridor associated with milling of Quincy and Calumet mines along Torch Lake’s western shore. The tour takes a look at areas from Mason to Tamarack City, Hubbell and Lake Linden, viewing mill sites and stampsand areas while discussing the modern implications and environmental mitigation efforts.

Upcoming tours will explore “Trials and Trails of Huron Creek,” with Alex Mayer (CEE) and Carol MacLennan (SS), Wednesday Aug. 3 and “Hockey Arenas of the Copper Country,” with Bill Sproule (CEE), Thursday Sept. 8.

All tours begin with the social at 5 p.m. with the tours to follow at 5:30 p.m. and are expected to last two hours. The cost is $25 ($20 for museum members). Reservations are recommended and your seat is not guaranteed until payment is made.

Check out the museum’s Facebook page.

From Tech Today.

NSF Video Showcase features Geoheritage Field Education

photo by Jim Belote
photo by John Belote

image53799-scol

Dr. Erika Vye, who earned her PhD in Geology at Michigan Tech just last month, together with her PhD advisor Professor Bill Rose, have created interpretative videos about the geological underpinnings of the Keweenaw. One such video, “Geoheritage Field Education in Michigan’s UP”, which features beautiful aerial drone imagery, is live now on the NFS Video Showcase, http://videohall.com/p/791 #stemvideohall. Please watch and vote. Public choice voting will end at 8:00 pm Monday, May 23. 2016, but the video will remain online.

Vye and Rose aim to connect people more personally to the the science of Keweenaw geology. Learn more at geo.mtu.edu/KeweenawGeoheritage.