Category: Adobe Acrobat

Using the Redaction Tool in Adobe Acrobat Pro

One of the requirements for a Thesis, Dissertation, or Report to pass our formatting checks to make sure that all signatures in your document are properly obscured to protect the identity of the signer.  To help you figure this out, we’ve created a step by step blog post on how you can use the Redact tool in Adobe Acrobat Pro to remove signatures.

To begin, you will need to open your document or the letter which you need to redact a signature from in Adobe Acrobat Pro. Make sure that you are using Acrobat Pro as the redaction tool is not available in Adobe Reader.

Example
We will use this example letter to guide you through the redaction process.

Once you have the document open in Adobe Acrobat Pro, you will want to locate the Actions menu on the right side of your screen. This is often just a small arrow as pictured below.

Expand Actions Menu
Expand the Actions Menu to see all of the Actions that Adobe Acrobat Pro has to offer.

Once this menu has been expanded, click on More Tools to find the Redact tool.

More Tools
Clicking on More Tools will give us access to the Redact tool.

To find the Redact tool you will need to scroll to near the bottom of the page. Redact is located under the Protect & Standardize section of tools. Once you have located the tool, click on Add.

Add Redact
Add the Redact tool to your Actions menu for easy access in the future.

To navigate back to your document now you will need to click on the tab with the document name at the top of the screen as seen below.

Return to Document
Adobe Acrobat Pro has tabs to make navigating between menus and documents easy.

To start the Redaction process you will want to go to your Actions menu on the right and click on Redact. Then you will see the Redact toolbar appear at the top of the screen.

Redact menu
The Redact toolbar has all of the tools you need to redact a signature in one centralized location.

Now we are ready to actually Redact information. The first step is to click on Mark For Redaction. When a dropdown menu appears, choose Text & Images.

Mark for Redaction
The Mark for Redaction tool lets us choose what text, images, or objects we need to redact from the document.

When the message appears telling you there are two steps to Redaction, go ahead and click on OK.  Click “Don’t show again” if you don’t want this reminder to display the next time you use the redaction tool.

2steps
We added the Mark for Redaction and Apply Redaction tools to our toolbar in the beginning of this post.

Next we will want to go ahead and select the area of the document we want to redact. This will box the selected area/text in red. Once you have selected your text/images to be redacted, you can click on the Apply Redaction tool which will generate the message as seen below reminding you that this will remove content from the document. Click on OK.

Apply Redaction 2
Applying the redaction will permanently remove information from your document. Do not proceed until you are sure you’re ready to redact.

Once the redaction has been applied, you will get a message saying that you have successfully redacted information from your document and asking if you would like to remove hidden information. We recommend that you click Yes. This scan may take a while if your document is large. When it is complete, you have successfully redacted information!

Remove Hidden Info
Removing the hidden information from your document makes sure that there are no traces of personal data attached that may be confidential.

If your document looks like the one below at the end of the redaction process, congratulations! You successfully redacted information from your document.

Success
Redacting is very important to protect the identity of those whose signatures are in documents. Failure to redact a signature will result in your document being rejected during formatting review.

We hope that you found this blog post helpful. If you have any questions feel free to email us at gradschool@mtu.edu or stop by our offices on the 4th Floor of the Administration Building.


Checking Your Margins Using Double-Side Formatting

Welcome back to the Michigan Tech Graduate School Newsblog. Since Thesis, Dissertation, and Report writing season is in full swing now we thought it might be helpful to give you a brief reminder on how you can check your margins before submitting your document to the Graduate School.

There are two ways described in “The Guide” to format your dissertation, thesis, or report: Single Side and Double Side formatting. In the post below we will walk you through how to use Adobe Acrobat Pro to check your margins in a Double Side formatted document. If you’re using Single Side formatting, click here to access our previous post on that topic.!

Turning on Grids and Rulers

If you know how to turn on Grids, you may notice that Adobe defaults to a 3×3 grid. Since we have a binding edge margin requirement of 1.5″ and a non-binding edge requirement of 1″ it really isn’t all that helpful if our grid is in 1/3 inch increments. To improve functionality we need to change the grids to 4×4 (this gives us 1/4″ grid lines). To do this, you will want to go to Edit> Preferences. That’s (Ctrl +K) for you keystroke people. Once in Preferences, you will see a white box on the left side called Categories. In this box, you should scroll down until you see Units & Guides (near the bottom) and then click on Units & Guides. Within Units & Guides you will see three sections. In the middle section, Layout Grid, you will want to change the Subdivisions from 3 to 4. In this section you can also change several other features of the grid so please be sure that you do not change any of the other settings or you risk checking your margins incorrectly. If you happen to have trouble, reset your measurements so that they match the image below and you will be all set.

When turning on the Grid, always be sure to double check that you have 1 inch between the lines (Height and Width) and 4 subdivisions. Otherwise your margin checks won’t match ours.

Adobe allows us to turn on both  Grids and Rulers so that we can check our margins with ease. Once you have changed the Grid preferences as described above, you will next want to turn on the Grids. To do this, you will need to go to View> Show/Hide> Rulers & Grids> Grid. If you’re more of a keystroke person you can also use Ctrl+U to quickly turn grids on and off.

Turn on Grids
You can quickly turn the Grid in Adobe Acrobat Pro on/off  by using the Ctrl+U keystroke.

Once your grids are turned on you will also want to turn on Rulers. Turning Rulers on is much simpler than turning on Grids. For the keystroke crowd, simply use Ctrl +R. If you prefer to click, use the following path: View> Show/Hide> Rulers & Grids> Rulers. This is shown in the image below.

Turn on Rulers
You can quickly turn on Rulers in Adobe Acrobat Pro by using the Ctrl+R keystroke.

Setting Page Orientation For A Double Side Document

Changing the Orientation of Landscape Pages

Once you have your Grids and Rulers turned on you will next want to check your page orientation. If you do not have any landscape pages, please proceed to the next section, Changing the Orientation of Alternate Pages. If you have Landscape pages you will need to rotate them 90 degrees counter clockwise before checking the margins. To do this, first click on the Rotate icon. This can be found in the “Quick Tools” bar at the top of your screen. If you do not see a Rotate icon, right click and choose “Customize Quick Tools.” When this dialog box opens, click on the “Organize Pages section(seen below) and choose either the “Right” Rotate tool and then click on the small arrow on the right side of the box. Now Rotate should appear in your “Quick Tools.”

Customize Quick Tools
You can customize your Quick Tools menu to gain access to lots of useful tools with a simple click. One of these tools, is the Rotate tool.

After you click on Rotate from your “Quick Tools” menu and the Rotate Pages box appears, choose “Counter Clockwise 90 degrees” in the Direction box. Under Page Range be sure to select “All”. Under Rotate, choose “Even and Odd Pages” in the top drop-down box and “Landscape Pages” in the second drop-down box. Before selecting OK, please be sure your box matches the image shown below.

Landscape Rotate
Landscape pages should always be rotated Counterclockwise 90 degrees prior to checking margins.

 Changing the Orientation of Alternate Pages

In double side formatting, the binding edge margin alternates from the left side to the right side on every other page. To account for this when checking your margins we need to rotate every even page by 180 degrees. To do this, first click on the Rotate icon. If you do not see this icon in your toolbar, please see the section above for instructions on how to add this tool. Once you see the Rotate Pages screen (as shown below) you will want to make some changes. First, change the Direction to “180 degrees.” Next, under the Page Range section, be sure that “All” is selected. In the last section, Rotate, be sure that the first box reads “Even Pages Only” and the second box reads “Pages of Any Orientation.” See the image below to verify that you have made the correct selections. Once your screen looks correct, click OK.

DoubleSide_Page Orientation

Checking Your Margins

Now that you have turned on the Rulers and Grids and rotated any Landscape pages you may have you’re ready to check your margins. To do this, Zoom in to 125% and follow the instructions below.

 Checking the Binding Edge Margin

As we mentioned previously (and you already know from reading Section 3.2 of The Guide) the rule for the Binding Edge (left) margin that it must be at least 1.5″ and not more than 1.6″. To check this, we recommend placing your cursor on the 1.5″ grid line and then proceeding to scroll (don’t cheat and use Page Down or you will miss stuff) through your document. If you have a lot of pages, this can be time consuming but it’s better to get it right the first time than to be scrambling to figure it out right before the deadline. When you’ve completed this, proceed to the Non-Binding Edge margins.

Checking the Non-Binding Edge Margins

The other three margins in your document (right, top and bottom) are all considered Non-Binding Edge margins. These must adhere to the guidelines of at least 1″ but no more than 1.25″ as per Section 3.2 of The Guide. To check the right margin, place your cursor on the 7.5″ grid line and scroll down. For the Top and Bottom margins, you should Zoom out to between 85% and 100% and scroll through your document making sure that there is nothing in the margins. One word of caution is to carefully check the location of your page numbers. These are the most common item that we find in the bottom and top margins when reviewing documents.

Wrapping Up

If you have successfully checked your margins and not found anything then your document is one step closer to being ready to submit. If you have any questions or we can be of further assistance, feel free to contact us at gradschool@mtu.edu or stop by our office on the 4th Floor of the Administration Building.


Checking Your Margins Using Single Side Formatting

Welcome back to the Michigan Tech Graduate School Newsblog. Since Thesis, Dissertation, and Report writing season is in full swing now we thought it might be helpful to give you a brief reminder on how you can check your margins before submitting your document to the Graduate School.

There are two ways described in “The Guide” to format your dissertation, thesis, or report: Single Side and Double Side formatting. In the post below we will walk you through how to use Adobe Acrobat Pro to check your margins in a Single Side formatted document. If you’re using Double Side formatting, check out our post on that here!

Turning on Grids and Rulers

If you know how to turn on Grids, you may notice that Adobe defaults to a 3×3 grid. Since we have a binding edge margin requirement of 1.5″ and a non-binding edge requirement of 1″ it really isn’t all that helpful if our grid is in 1/3 inch increments. To improve functionality we need to change the grids to 4×4 (this gives us 1/4″ grid lines). To do this, you will want to go to Edit> Preferences. That’s (Ctrl +K) for you keystroke people. Once in Preferences, you will see a white box on the left side called Categories. In this box, you should scroll down until you see Units & Guides (near the bottom) and then click on Units & Guides. Within Units & Guides you will see three sections. In the middle section, Layout Grid, you will want to change the Subdivisions from 3 to 4. In this section you can also change several other features of the grid so please be sure that you do not change any of the other settings or you risk checking your margins incorrectly. If you happen to have trouble, reset your measurements so that they match the image below and you will be all set.

When turning on the Grid, always be sure to double check that you have 1 inch between the lines (Height and Width) and 4 subdivisions. Otherwise your margin checks won’t match ours.

Adobe allows us to turn on both  Grids and Rulers so that we can check our margins with ease. Once you have changed the Grid preferences as described above, you will next want to turn on the Grids. To do this, you will need to go to View> Show/Hide> Rulers & Grids> Grid. If you’re more of a keystroke person you can also use Ctrl+U to quickly turn grids on and off.

Turn on Grids
You can quickly turn the Grid in Adobe Acrobat Pro on/off  by using the Ctrl+U keystroke.

Once your grids are turned on you will also want to turn on Rulers. Turning Rulers on is much simpler than turning on Grids. For the keystroke crowd, simply use Ctrl +R. If you prefer to click, use the following path: View> Show/Hide> Rulers & Grids> Rulers. This is shown in the image below.

Turn on Rulers
You can quickly turn on Rulers in Adobe Acrobat Pro by using the Ctrl+R keystroke.

 Checking Page Orientation

Once you have your Grids and Rulers turned on you will next want to check your page orientation. If you do not have any Landscape pages in your document, you may skip to the next section; Checking Your Margins. If you have Landscape pages you will need to rotate them 90 degrees counter clockwise before checking the margins. To do this, first click on the Rotate icon. This can be found in the “Quick Tools” bar at the top of your screen. If you do not see a Rotate icon, right click and choose “Customize Quick Tools.” When this dialog box opens, click on the “Organize Pages section(seen below) and choose the “Right” Rotate tool and then click on the small arrow on the right side of the box. Now Rotate should appear in your “Quick Tools.”

Customize Quick Tools
You can customize your Quick Tools menu to gain access to lots of useful tools with a simple click. One of these tools, is the Rotate tool.

After you click on Rotate from your “Quick Tools” menu and the Rotate Pages box appears, choose “Counter Clockwise 90 degrees” in the Direction box. Under Page Range be sure to select “All”. Under Rotate, choose “Even and Odd Pages” in the top drop-down box and “Landscape Pages” in the second drop-down box. Before selecting OK, please be sure your box matches the image shown below.

Landscape Rotate
Landscape pages should always be rotated Counterclockwise 90 degrees prior to checking margins.

 

Checking Your Margins

Now that you have turned on the Rulers and Grids and rotated any Landscape pages you may have you’re ready to check your margins. To do this, Zoom in to 125% and follow the instructions below.

 Checking the Binding Edge Margin

As we mentioned previously (and you already know from reading Section 3.2 of The Guide) the rule for the Binding Edge (left) margin that it must be at least 1.5″ and not more than 1.6″. To check this, we recommend placing your cursor on the 1.5″ grid line and then proceeding to scroll (don’t cheat and use Page Down or you will miss stuff) through your document. If you have a lot of pages, this can be time consuming but it’s better to get it right the first time than to be scrambling to figure it out right before the deadline. When you’ve completed this, proceed to the Non-Binding Edge margins.

Checking the Non-Binding Edge Margins

The other three margins in your document (right, top and bottom) are all considered Non-Binding Edge margins. These must adhere to the guidelines of at least 1″ but no more than 1.25″ as per Section 3.2 of The Guide. To check the right margin, place your cursor on the 7.5″ grid line and scroll down. For the Top and Bottom margins, you should Zoom out to between 85% and 100% and scroll through your document making sure that there is nothing in the margins. One word of caution is to carefully check the location of your page numbers. These are the most common item that we find in the bottom and top margins when reviewing documents.

Wrapping Up

If you have successfully checked your margins and not found anything then your document is one step closer to being ready to submit. If you have any questions or we can be of further assistance, feel free to contact us at gradschool@mtu.edu or stop by our office on the 4th Floor of the Administration Building.


How to change color pages to black and white

Some word processors will generate lines (such as those found in tables) and/or text in a combination of red and green that will appear black on the screen, but will appear in color to the bindery that will print your document. Depending on how other items are created and/or inserted into your document, grey-scale figures may also appear in a combination of red and green.

This tutorial will show one way to convert color items in a PDF file to black and white. These instructions have been provided by the bindery that prints Michigan Tech dissertations, theses, and reports, but they are not foolproof. You may find that certain items do not properly convert to black and white. In that case, it is recommended to:

  • go back to the source image
  • change the source image to black and white or gray-scale using Photoshop
  • insert the image into your document
  • convert the PDF document (recommended setting: High Quality Print)

It is recommended to convert all PDF documents using the High Quality Print setting in Adobe Acrobat.  If you are not using Adobe Acrobat, consult the instructions with your PDF creation software to select similar options. Using this setting in Word will create black and white text and table borders.

You can check the location of color pages in your document using a preflight profile available from the Graduate School.

Once you know the location of the color pages, click on “Tools” in Adobe Acrobat, and then select “Print Production,” as shown in the screen shot below.

Opening the Print Production tools in Adobe Acrobat

If the “Print Production” section is not available, click on the icon boxed in the upper right (see below) to place a check mark next to the tools you would like displayed.

How to activate the Print Production tools.

From the “Print Production” tools section, select “Convert Colors.”

Select the “Convert Colors” tool.

In the pop-up menu that appears, change the “Conversion Profile” to “Gray Gamma 2.2” and check the “Preserve Black” box.  In the “Convert Pages” section, select the pages you would like to convert. Click “OK” when done. Please note that you will not be able to undo these changes.

Settings to convert color to black and white.

If you have a large number of color pages scattered through your document, this can take a long time.  In the “Object Type” you can select “Text” to just change the text in your document to black and white. This will convert all text, but not lines in tables, to black and white.  Do not use this shortcut if you are using colored text in your document.

Convert only text to black and white.
Convert only text to black and white.

Use the Graduate School’s preflight profile to check the location and number of color pages that remain. Troubleshoot as needed.


How to check PDF conversion settings for images and embedding fonts

Creating high quality images and embedding all fonts are two requirements of creating a thesis or dissertation.  These two requirements will ensure that your document is presented at the highest quality and that the document appears the same on any computer, regardless of the fonts that are available.  This tutorial will show how to check and select the conversion settings in Word to make sure your document meets the requirements.

When creating a PDF file, there are many options that can be selected.  It’s similar to printing to a printer – you can select double sided or single sided, with a staple or without, color or black and white.  To access the PDF settings, click on the “Acrobat” tab in Word, and then on “Preferences.”

Click on "Prefences" from the Acrobat tab in Word.

In the “Conversion Settings” drop down menu, you can select a variety of pre-installed settings.  For this example, we will select “High Quality Print”

Select the conversion settings desired.

Click on “Advanced Settings…” to see the detailed settings for the option we have selected.

Click on "Advanced Settings..." to examine the settings more closely.

Click on “Images” in the left hand panel to see the image settings.  When we downsample images, we don’t want any images lower than 300 pixels per inch. Check that the number in the boxed areas below is no less than 300.

Examining the image settings. The boxed numbers must be 300 or greater for high quality graphics.

Click on “Fonts” in the left hand panel to see the font settings.  To embed all fonts, the option “Embed all fonts” must be checked and the “Never Embed” box in the lower right must be empty.

The fonts settings. The box "Embed all fonts" must be checked, and the "Never Embed" box must be empty to embed all fonts.

On a networked machine, you won’t be able to change any of the settings.  It’s good to know how to check them, though, just in case something was not installed properly.  The most useful built-in settings are:

  • High Quality Print – will embed all fonts and maintain high quality graphics. This is good for a thesis or dissertation submission.
  • Press Quality – will embed all fonts and maintain high quality graphics.  This is good for a thesis or dissertation submission.
  • Standard – will downsample images to 150ppi, and embeds unusual fonts.  This is good for standard documents that don’t require high quality graphics.
  • Smallest file size – downsamples color images to 100 ppi, and greyscale images to 150ppi.  Does not embed any fonts.  This is good if you want to e-mail your document and the initial file size is large.

Keep in mind that within Adobe Acrobat, you can take a large PDF file, and use the “Save As” command to save it as a reduced file size document. You can’t take a low quality PDF file, however, and improve the quality of graphics.


How to create bookmarks using Word and Adobe Acrobat

Having bookmarks that replicate the table of contents (TOC) – and include the TOC – is one requirement of the procedures to submit a thesis or dissertation.  Bookmarks allow the reader to see a TOC wherever they are in the document, and navigate easily to that section of the document.  This tutorial will show you how to create bookmarks using Word and Adobe Acrobat on the PC.

To start, use styles consistently throughout your document to create a structure in your document.  If you are  using a numbered style for your outline, suggested styles are shown below for a generic document structure:

Table of Contents (Heading 7, not included in Table of Contents)

List of Figures (Heading 6)

List of Tables (Heading 6)

Acknowledgements (Heading 6)

Abstract (Heading 6)

1. Introduction (Heading 1)

1.1 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.2 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3.1 Sub-section (Heading 3)

2. Hypotheses and Goals (Heading 1)

etc.

Heading styles are numbered 1-9.  The use of Heading 6 and 7 in the above sample is arbitrary.  If you only have one sub-section in each chapter, you may use Headings 3 and 4, for example.  If you are not using Word to number your chapters, you may use Heading 1 in place of Heading 6 in the example shown above.

In Word, go to the Acrobat tab, and select “Preferences.”

Select "Preferences" from the "Acrobat" tab in Word.

On the “Settings” tab, make sure that the “Create Bookmarks” box is checked.  Click on the “Bookmarks” tab.  Mac users will not find these options in Adobe Acrobat X.  They should either use the web based converter or a PC to convert their document.

Acrobat PDFMaker preferences. Make sure the "Create Bookmarks" box is checked.

On the “Bookmarks” tab, check the styles that you would like converted to bookmarks, and click on the “Level” number to select the appropriate level with the drop down menu that will appear.  Note that since Heading 6 and 7 are main sections, they are assigned Levl 1, along with Heading 1.

On the "Bookmarks" tab, select which headings need to be converted to bookmarks.

In Adobe Acrobat, click on the “Bookmarks” icon on the left hand side to display the bookmarks that exist in the document.

Click on the "Bookmarks" icon to show the bookmarks.

It’s nice to let your reader know there are bookmarks in the document by formatting the bookmarks panel to open automatically. In Adobe Acrobat, select “File…Properties…”  Select the “Initial View” tab, and in the “Navigation tab” drop down menu, select “Bookmarks Panel and Page” and then save your PDF file.  The next time you open your PDF file, you will see the bookmarks panel and the first page of the document.

Set the document to automatically open the bookmarks panel.


How to create a hyperlinked table of contents

Having a table of contents (TOC) with hyperlinks is one requirement of the procedures to submit a thesis or dissertation.  Hyperlinks allow a reader to click on any part of your table of contents and navigate directly to that page.  This tutorial will show you how to create a hyperlinked table of contents using Word and Adobe Acrobat on the PC.

To start, use styles consistently throughout your document to create a structure in your document.  If you are  using a numbered style for your outline, suggested styles are shown below for a generic document structure:

Table of Contents (Heading 7, not included in Table of Contents)

List of Figures (Heading 6)

List of Tables (Heading 6)

Acknowledgements (Heading 6)

Abstract (Heading 6)

1. Introduction (Heading 1)

1.1 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.2 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3.1 Sub-section (Heading 3)

2. Hypotheses and Goals (Heading 1)

etc.

Heading styles are numbered 1-9.  The use of Heading 6 and 7 in the above sample is arbitrary.  If you only have one sub-section in each chapter, you may use Headings 3 and 4, for example.  If you are not using Word to number your chapters, you may use Heading 1 in place of Heading 6 in the example shown above.

In Word, put your cursor where you would like the TOC to appear, go to the “References” tab in Word, and click on “Table of Contents.”

The table of contents section of the References tab in Word.

Select “Insert Table of Contents…” from the drop-down menu.

The drop-down menu selector for "Table of Contents"

Make sure that a tab leader of periods is selected, and that the page numbers are right aligned.  Click on “Options…”

The Table of Contents options.

Check the box “Styles” and scroll down to find the Heading styles.  Heading 1 will be level 1 in your table of contents, Heading 2 will be level 2, Heading 3 will be level 3.  Heading 6 is also a level 1 heading for your table of contents.  Click “OK”

Sample table of contents in Word. Grey areas are field codes that are automatically generated by Word.

The resultant TOC will include all relevant sections.  Edit the TOC 1, TOC 2, etc. styles to meet your formatting preferences.  Note that the items shaded in grey are field codes.  This text can be edited, but if you update the entire table of contents, it will revert to the original text.

Convert your document to PDF using the “Create PDF” command on the PDF tab in Word.  Check in the preferences that the “Add Links” box is checked.  Mac users will not find these options in current versions of Adobe Acrobat.  They should either use the web based converter or a PC to convert their document.

Acrobat PDFMaker preferences. Make sure the "Add Links" box is checked.


How to use a preflight profile

Preflight profiles in Adobe Acrobat® Pro can be used to check properties of a PDF document, as well as make some automatic fixes to them.  In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to use preflight profiles developed by the Graduate School to check the image quality in a PDF file.

To begin, download a preflight profile and save it to your computer. Depending on your browser settings, you might need to right click on the link to save the file to your computer as a *.kfp (or*.xml) file. The Graduate School has created the four below:

  1. Graduate School All Items will show you all items that have errors (red “x”) or should be examined (yellow exclamation point).  It includes checking page size (red “x”), embedded fonts (red “x”), type 3 fonts (red “x”), image quality (yellow exclamation point), and color images (only important if saving printing costs is a concern for you).  This is the same checker that the Graduate School uses.
  2. Graduate School Embedded Fonts will show you all of the fonts that aren’t embedded and where type 3 fonts are used.
  3. Graduate School Images will show you which images have a resolution below 300ppi.
  4. Graduate School Color Pages will show you which pages are in color.

First, you need to open the preflight tool.  In Adobe Acrobat® XI Pro, the preflight tool is located in the “Print Production” section of the “Tools.”

From the Print Production tool, select “Preflight.”
The first time, you will need to import the profile created by the Graduate School.  Press the options button, and select “Import Preflight Profile….”

Select “Import Preflight Profile” to load a profile.
Find the *.kfp file where you saved it on your computer and click the “Open” button. Note that if you saved the file as an XML file, you will need to select “All Types” in the “Files of Type” drop down menu.

Navigate to the location of the preflight profile on your computer.
Highlight the profile, and click on the “Analyze” button. In this example, we’re checking the resolution of images in our document.

Select the profile you want to run, and click “Analyze.”  In this example, we’ll examine our document to determine which images are less than 300 ppi.
When the profile is complete, the results tab will show the total number of errors, and a list of where they are.  Note that the pixel size and resolution of the image is listed – the image highlighted in blue is 176 ppi, which is significantly below our requirements for 300 ppi images.  Double click on any item to see it in the PDF file.

The results tab shows all of the images that are less than 300 ppi. Double-click on an item to navigate to it in the pdf file.
For some LaTeX files, the Graduate School has seen extraneous matches to bitmap images.  These images are generally horizontal lines in equations.  The preflight profile can be edited to only check color and gray scale images, if desired.


How to rotate landscape pages in a pdf file

For your thesis or dissertation, you must either present all pages in portrait orientation, or list all of the landscape pages on the Degree completion form.  If you have many landscape pages, it may be easier to rotate the pages in the pdf than list all of the pages one by one.

This tip requires Adobe Acrobat, and applies to either a single sided or double sided document.

To start, go to the “Tools” area, select the “Pages” subsection and the “Rotate” command as highlighted in the screen shot below.  Right click on the button and select “Add to Quick Tools” to add the command to your toolbar.

Selecting the "Rotate" command.

 

Set the Direction and Rotate options as shown in the screen shot below.  Be sure to select “All” pages.

The "Rotate Pages" dialog with proper settings to rotate landscape pages.
The "Rotate Pages" dialog with proper settings to rotate landscape pages.

Adobe Acrobat will rotate all of the landscape pages to a portrait orientation.  Save your document and submit to the Graduate School!


How to check your papersize and page number location

Having the correct paper size and page number location is an important part of preparing a thesis or dissertation.  Adobe Reader and Acrobat have tools that will help you verify these elements of your document.

Check the basic paper size

In Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader, select File…Properties.

The file menu in Adobe Acrobat.
The file menu in Adobe Acrobat.

Click on the “Description” tab and look at the paper size.  The paper size of the primary paper will be listed.  If you have inserted over-sized pages, these will not be shown here.

The document properties window.
The document properties window.

Check the advanced paper size and page number location

Adobe Acrobat provides more tools for viewing your page size than Adobe Reader.  In Adobe Acrobat X Pro, turn on the rulers by selecting “View…Show/Hide…Rulers&Grids…Rulers”  or <ctrl> + R.  In version 9, turn on the ruler by selecting “View…Rulers” as shown in the screen shot below.

The view menu highlighting the rulers command.
The view menu highlighting the rulers command.

The ruler at the top and side of the page will appear.  Scroll through your document to see how large each page is, or to see the location of the page numbers on your finished page.

The rulers shown on a pdf file.
The rulers shown on a pdf file.

The grid can also be turned on by selecting “View…Grid” (version 9) or “View…Show/Hide…Rulers & Grid…Grid” or <ctrl> + u (Version X).  If you don’t like the default grid, you can change the options by selecting “Edit…Preferences”.  Select “Unit and Guides” and alter the layout to the desired grid spacing.

The Units and Guides preferences.
The Units and Guides preferences.

With the grid on and spaced at one inch intervals, it is easy to see that the page numbers are at least one inch from the edge of the page (see red line).  These page numbers are a little under 1.25″ away from the edge of the page – and are too high up on the page for the current procedures.

The pdf document with rulers and grid visible.
The pdf document with rulers and grid visible.