Category: Theses and Dissertations

Dissertation, thesis, and report posts

How to check PDF conversion settings for images and embedding fonts

Creating high quality images and embedding all fonts are two requirements of creating a thesis or dissertation.  These two requirements will ensure that your document is presented at the highest quality and that the document appears the same on any computer, regardless of the fonts that are available.  This tutorial will show how to check and select the conversion settings in Word to make sure your document meets the requirements.

When creating a PDF file, there are many options that can be selected.  It’s similar to printing to a printer – you can select double sided or single sided, with a staple or without, color or black and white.  To access the PDF settings, click on the “Acrobat” tab in Word, and then on “Preferences.”

Click on "Prefences" from the Acrobat tab in Word.

In the “Conversion Settings” drop down menu, you can select a variety of pre-installed settings.  For this example, we will select “High Quality Print”

Select the conversion settings desired.

Click on “Advanced Settings…” to see the detailed settings for the option we have selected.

Click on "Advanced Settings..." to examine the settings more closely.

Click on “Images” in the left hand panel to see the image settings.  When we downsample images, we don’t want any images lower than 300 pixels per inch. Check that the number in the boxed areas below is no less than 300.

Examining the image settings. The boxed numbers must be 300 or greater for high quality graphics.

Click on “Fonts” in the left hand panel to see the font settings.  To embed all fonts, the option “Embed all fonts” must be checked and the “Never Embed” box in the lower right must be empty.

The fonts settings. The box "Embed all fonts" must be checked, and the "Never Embed" box must be empty to embed all fonts.

On a networked machine, you won’t be able to change any of the settings.  It’s good to know how to check them, though, just in case something was not installed properly.  The most useful built-in settings are:

  • High Quality Print – will embed all fonts and maintain high quality graphics. This is good for a thesis or dissertation submission.
  • Press Quality – will embed all fonts and maintain high quality graphics.  This is good for a thesis or dissertation submission.
  • Standard – will downsample images to 150ppi, and embeds unusual fonts.  This is good for standard documents that don’t require high quality graphics.
  • Smallest file size – downsamples color images to 100 ppi, and greyscale images to 150ppi.  Does not embed any fonts.  This is good if you want to e-mail your document and the initial file size is large.

Keep in mind that within Adobe Acrobat, you can take a large PDF file, and use the “Save As” command to save it as a reduced file size document. You can’t take a low quality PDF file, however, and improve the quality of graphics.

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How to create bookmarks using Word and Adobe Acrobat

Having bookmarks that replicate the table of contents (TOC) – and include the TOC – is one requirement of the procedures to submit a thesis or dissertation.  Bookmarks allow the reader to see a TOC wherever they are in the document, and navigate easily to that section of the document.  This tutorial will show you how to create bookmarks using Word and Adobe Acrobat on the PC.

To start, use styles consistently throughout your document to create a structure in your document.  If you are  using a numbered style for your outline, suggested styles are shown below for a generic document structure:

Table of Contents (Heading 7, not included in Table of Contents)

List of Figures (Heading 6)

List of Tables (Heading 6)

Acknowledgements (Heading 6)

Abstract (Heading 6)

1. Introduction (Heading 1)

1.1 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.2 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3.1 Sub-section (Heading 3)

2. Hypotheses and Goals (Heading 1)

etc.

Heading styles are numbered 1-9.  The use of Heading 6 and 7 in the above sample is arbitrary.  If you only have one sub-section in each chapter, you may use Headings 3 and 4, for example.  If you are not using Word to number your chapters, you may use Heading 1 in place of Heading 6 in the example shown above.

In Word, go to the Acrobat tab, and select “Preferences.”

Select "Preferences" from the "Acrobat" tab in Word.

On the “Settings” tab, make sure that the “Create Bookmarks” box is checked.  Click on the “Bookmarks” tab.  Mac users will not find these options in Adobe Acrobat X.  They should either use the web based converter or a PC to convert their document.

Acrobat PDFMaker preferences. Make sure the "Create Bookmarks" box is checked.

On the “Bookmarks” tab, check the styles that you would like converted to bookmarks, and click on the “Level” number to select the appropriate level with the drop down menu that will appear.  Note that since Heading 6 and 7 are main sections, they are assigned Levl 1, along with Heading 1.

On the "Bookmarks" tab, select which headings need to be converted to bookmarks.

In Adobe Acrobat, click on the “Bookmarks” icon on the left hand side to display the bookmarks that exist in the document.

Click on the "Bookmarks" icon to show the bookmarks.

It’s nice to let your reader know there are bookmarks in the document by formatting the bookmarks panel to open automatically. In Adobe Acrobat, select “File…Properties…”  Select the “Initial View” tab, and in the “Navigation tab” drop down menu, select “Bookmarks Panel and Page” and then save your PDF file.  The next time you open your PDF file, you will see the bookmarks panel and the first page of the document.

Set the document to automatically open the bookmarks panel.

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How to create a hyperlinked table of contents

Having a table of contents (TOC) with hyperlinks is one requirement of the procedures to submit a thesis or dissertation.  Hyperlinks allow a reader to click on any part of your table of contents and navigate directly to that page.  This tutorial will show you how to create a hyperlinked table of contents using Word and Adobe Acrobat on the PC.

To start, use styles consistently throughout your document to create a structure in your document.  If you are  using a numbered style for your outline, suggested styles are shown below for a generic document structure:

Table of Contents (Heading 7, not included in Table of Contents)

List of Figures (Heading 6)

List of Tables (Heading 6)

Acknowledgements (Heading 6)

Abstract (Heading 6)

1. Introduction (Heading 1)

1.1 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.2 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3 Introduction sub-section (Heading 2)

1.3.1 Sub-section (Heading 3)

2. Hypotheses and Goals (Heading 1)

etc.

Heading styles are numbered 1-9.  The use of Heading 6 and 7 in the above sample is arbitrary.  If you only have one sub-section in each chapter, you may use Headings 3 and 4, for example.  If you are not using Word to number your chapters, you may use Heading 1 in place of Heading 6 in the example shown above.

In Word, put your cursor where you would like the TOC to appear, go to the “References” tab in Word, and click on “Table of Contents.”

The table of contents section of the References tab in Word.

Select “Insert Table of Contents…” from the drop-down menu.

The drop-down menu selector for "Table of Contents"

Make sure that a tab leader of periods is selected, and that the page numbers are right aligned.  Click on “Options…”

The Table of Contents options.

Check the box “Styles” and scroll down to find the Heading styles.  Heading 1 will be level 1 in your table of contents, Heading 2 will be level 2, Heading 3 will be level 3.  Heading 6 is also a level 1 heading for your table of contents.  Click “OK”

Sample table of contents in Word. Grey areas are field codes that are automatically generated by Word.

The resultant TOC will include all relevant sections.  Edit the TOC 1, TOC 2, etc. styles to meet your formatting preferences.  Note that the items shaded in grey are field codes.  This text can be edited, but if you update the entire table of contents, it will revert to the original text.

Convert your document to PDF using the “Create PDF” command on the PDF tab in Word.  Check in the preferences that the “Add Links” box is checked.  Mac users will not find these options in current versions of Adobe Acrobat.  They should either use the web based converter or a PC to convert their document.

Acrobat PDFMaker preferences. Make sure the "Add Links" box is checked.

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Nominations open for the 2012 CGS/ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award

Nominations are now closed for the 2012 CGS/ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award.

This year, nominations are being accepted from dissertations in the fields of:

  1. mathematics, physical sciences, and engineering (more details)
  2. social sciences (more details)

Michigan Tech may nominate one student in each field. PhD students who have completed all of their degree requirements between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012, are eligible.

A nomination packet must include the following required items:

  1. a completed nomination form.
  2. a 10-page abstract of the dissertation, double spaced on white letter-sized paper. (pdf preferred, number each page, and put nominee’s name on each page)
  3. three letters addressing the significance and quality of the PhD work
    1. one letter from the dissertation advisor.
    2. one letter from a member of the nominee’s dissertation committee.
    3. one letter from a person chosen by the nominee.

A nomination packet may also include the following optional items:

  1. abstract appendices containing non-textual material such as charts, tables or figures. (pdf preferred, number each page, and put nominee’s name on each page)
  2. a brief CV

Nominations must be delivered to Debra Charlesworth in the Graduate School no later than 4 p.m. on June 28; e-mail nominations are preferred.  Contact Debra (ddc@mtu.edu) if you have any questions about the competition.  See also the Council for Graduate School’s announcement page.

The fields of competition for 2013 will be Biological/Life Sciences and Humanities.

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How to schedule a meeting using the Google Calendar

The Google Calendar makes it easy for you to invite Graduate School staff to a meeting.  In particular, it is recommended to make an appointment with Debra Charlesworth to discuss your final thesis or dissertation questions.  Making an appointment will ensure the appropriate staff are available, and that we are prepared to meet with you.  You are also welcome to stop by anytime, particularly when Dr. Charlesworth’s schedule shows that she is available.

To start, log into the Google Calendar. Navigate to google.com/calendar – log in with your full MTU e-mail address and password.

Schedule an appointment by using the “create” button, or click and drag on the calendar. Click on “Edit Event” to add more details and invite guests. To drop off final paperwork, schedule a 15 minute appointment.  For other questions, select 30 or 60 minutes. Need more help? Check out the video tutorial from Google.

Click and drag to create an event.

Type the name of the staff member you’d like to meet with in the “Guests” box. Click on the “Find a time” tab to help you schedule an appropriate time.

On the “Find a time” tab, you’ll be able to see your schedule, along with all of your guests.   Need help? Google has a tutorial on using the find a time and invitation tools.

All meetings, unless otherwise agreed upon, will take place in the Graduate School, on the 4th floor of the Administration building.

You will receive an e-mail when the appointment is accepted, unless you have changed the default settings on your account.

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Van Pelt and Opie Library to Offer EndNote Workshop for Graduate Students

Learn how Endnote can save you hours of time in the library research and document preparation process!

The Van Pelt and Opie Library is offering two, free EndNote Basics workshops for Michigan Tech graduate students on March 26 and March 28.  EndNote is citation management software which allows anyone to easily collect, organize and use their research references.

In this free library workshop participants will learn the basic skills for building a collection of citations, how to manage their collection and how to include the citations in their documents.  The workshop will also go over how to easily create bibliographies.

The sessions will be held:

  • Monday, March 26 @ 12:00 – 1:30 PM
  • Wednesday, March 28 @ 10:00 – 11:30 AM

Seating is limited. Please sign up today by sending and email to: libraryworkshop@mtu.edu

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New theses and dissertations available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses and dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Forest Ecology and Management
  • Geophysics
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Rhetoric and Technical Communication

Shawn Apostel
Doctor of Philosophy in Rhetoric and Technical Communication
Advisor: Diane L Shoos
Dissertation title: An “Army of One” to “Army Strong”: Visual Media and U.S. Army Recruitment During Bush’s “War on Terror”

Dulcinea Avouris
Master of Science in Geophysics
Co-Advisors: Gregory Phillip Waite and Simon Anthony Carn
Thesis title: Triggering of Volcanic Activity by Large Earthquakes

Ted Champagne
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Brian D Barkdoll
Thesis title: Physical Modeling of Air Injection as a Scour Remediation Technique Near Gated Weir Stilling Basins

Ding Chu
Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering
Advisor: Miguel Levy
Thesis title: Optical Hysteresis of Ridge Waveguide Magnetic Garnet Films and Cavities in Two-Dimensional Magneto-Photonic Crystal Slabs

Kyle Forgette
Master of Science in Biological Sciences
Co-Advisors: Casey J Huckins and David James Flaspohler
Thesis title: The Relationship between Instream Habitat Characteristics, Emergent Insects, and Riparian Bird Communities

Patcharapol Gorgitrattanagul
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Advisor: Amitabh Narain
Thesis title: The Length of the Annular Regime for Condensing Flows Inside a Horizontal Channel – The Experimental Determination of its Values and its Trends

Rohan Gumaste
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Advisor: Amitabh Narain
Thesis title: Computational Simulations of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Systems – with Innovative and First-Principles Based Simulation for the Underlying Unsteady Melting (and Solidification) Process

Mickey Jarvi
Master of Science in Forest Ecology and Management
Advisor: Andrew J Burton
Thesis title: The Effects of a Changing Climate on Root Respiration of Woody Plants in Sugar Maple Forests and Northern Peatlands

Jordan Klinger
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering
Advisor: David R Shonnard
Thesis title: Production of Biofuel Intermediates from Woody Feedstocks via Fast Pyrolysis and Torrefaction

Jolanta Len
Master of Science in Forest Ecology and Management
Co-Advisors: Robert Edgar Froese and Eric Agestam
Thesis title: The Growth Response of Planted Red Pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) to Alternative Thinning Regimes

Mohsen Pourkhaatoun
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Seyed Alireza Zekavat
Dissertation title: High Precision Range Estimation Techniques for Multi-Path Wireless Environments

Oskar Reynisson
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Co-Advisors: Bruce Mork and Jeffrey B Burl
Thesis title: Development and Simulation of DSP Filters for Transformer Differential Protection

Padmanaban Sasthan Kuttipillai
Master of Science in Chemistry
Co-Advisors: Bahne C Cornilsen and Tony Neal Rogers
Thesis title: Performance Evaluation of a Novel Asymmetric Capacitor Using a Light-Weight, Carbon Foam Supported Nickel Electrode

Ganesh Sukumar
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Advisor: Song-Lin Yang
Thesis title: Implementation of Monotonic Higher Order Upwind Scheme in KIVA 4

Jennifer Witting
Master of Science in Biological Sciences
Co-Advisors: Jason Robert Carter and John James Durocher
Thesis title: The Effects of Fixed Night Shift Work on 24 Hour Blood Pressure Regulation, State Anxiety Levels and Total Sleep Time

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How to submit an assignment to Canvas

Canvas is the learning management system that Michigan Tech uses for classes, and the Graduate School uses to collect theses, dissertations, and reports. This post will explain how to submit an assignment for the Graduate School.

First, log into Canvas by visiting http://mtu.instructure.com and logging in with your Michigan Tech ISO ID and password (the same one you use to access Banweb or your e-mail).

The Canvas log in screen. Use your Michigan Tech ID and password.

From the “Courses” menu, select the course “Graduate Candidates.” Contact Debra Charlesworth if you are not enrolled in this course.

Select the course “Graduate Candidates” after you log in.

The home page of the course contains links to resources that will help you prepare a thesis, dissertation, or report.  Click on “Modules” in the left hand menu to go to the submission modules.

Select “Modules” from the left hand navigation.

There are three modules available:  MS Students – Report Submission, MS Students – Thesis Submission, and PhD Students – Dissertation Submission.  Note that each module allows you to submit a pre-defense document or post-defense document with Degree completion form.  Since a pre-defense submission is required for all students, this must be submitted before the second assignment will be available.  In this example, we’ll submit a pre-defense thesis, so click on “Pre-defense Thesis Submission.”

Options under Modules tab.

The main area of the page will contain instructions on what you need to submit, and links to helpful resources applicable to each part of the submission process. In the upper right area, click on “Submit Assignment”

Click on “Submit Assignment”

In the submission area:

  1. Click on “Browse” to navigation to a location on your computer where the document is stored.  Note that you can also link your Google Doc folder to Canvas if you use that service to store your files.
  2. Click on the “+” icon if you need to “Add Another File.”  When submitting multiple files, please submit all files at once.
  3. Type comments to the Graduate School, such as the reference format you have used, in the comments box.
  4. Click “Submit Assignment” when you are ready to submit.
The submission area – browse for a file (or files), add comments, and submit.

The “Submission” box in the upper right now shows that your assignment is submitted, the time it was submitted, and allows you to view the details of the submission. Verify that all of the files the Graduate School needs to review your submission are present in the outlined box.

The upper right will show you that you have submitted the document.

The Graduate School will e-mail you when your review is complete.  Go back to the assignment on Canvas, and you will find any text comments and attachments in the “Submission” box. The Graduate School will only review one pre-defense submission, and once your document is accepted, no changes may be made to the document. You can revise your submission anytime before the Graduate School has begun your review by clicking on the “Re-submit assignment” link.

Revise your submission anytime before your review begins. This will delay your review.

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New theses and dissertations available in the Library

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses and dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Applied Ecology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Forest Ecology and Management
  • Forest Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
  • Geology
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics


Adam Airoldi
Master of Science in Forest Ecology and Management
Advisor: Andrew J Burton
Thesis title: Forest-Limit Fluctuation in Response to Land Use and Climate Variability: A History of the Alpine Forest Regions Around Røros, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway and the Social and Ecological Impacts of Past Industrialization

Marcel Dijkstra
Master of Science in Environmental Engineering
Advisor: Martin T Auer
Thesis title: Mechanisms Contributing to the Deep Chlorophyll Maximum in Lake Superior

Lara Kapelanczyk
Master of Science in Geology
Advisor: William I Rose
Thesis title: An Eruptive History of Maderas Volcano Using New40Ar/39Ar Ages and Geochemical Analyses

Yang Li
Master of Science in Forest Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Advisor: Hairong Wei
Thesis title: Cloning and Characterization of the Genes Involved in Cambial Growth in Response to Elevated [CO2]

Chang Liu
Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematical Sciences
Advisor: Mark S Gockenbach
Dissertation title: Problems in the Classical Calculus of Variations

Seyyed Hessam Mir Shah Ghassemi
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
Co-Advisors: Reza Shahbazian Yassar and Yoke Khin Yap
Dissertation title: In-Situ Electrical, Mechanical and Electrochemical Characterizations of One-Dimensional Nanostructures

Duane Morrow
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
Co-Advisors: Tammy Lynn Haut Donahue and Gregory M Odegard
Dissertation title: Development of a Continuum Mechanics Model of Passive Skeletal Muscle

Patricia Nadeau
Doctor of Philosophy in Geology
Co-Advisors: Gregory Phillip Waite and Simon Anthony Carn
Dissertation title: Ultraviolet Digital Imaging of Volcanic Plumes: Implementation and Application to Magmatic Processes at Basaltic Volcanoes

Anthony Oxley
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Stanley J Vitton
Thesis title: Comparison of Three Methods for Driven Pile Capacity

Anahita Pakzad
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
Advisor: Reza Shahbazian Yassar
Dissertation title: Nanomechanics of Cellulose Crystals and Cellulose-Based Polymer Composites

Louis Pignotti
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry
Co-Advisors: Eugenijus Urnezius and Rudy L Luck
Dissertation title: Multimetallic Complexes Based on Phosphine- and Phosphine Oxide- Appended p-Hydroquinones

Jayanth Ramamurthy
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Bruce Mork
Dissertation title: Wind Plant Interaction with Series-Compensated Power Systems

Julio Rivera
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
Advisor: John W Sutherland
Dissertation title: A Sustainability Study of Nanomaterials Including Societal and Occupational Implications

Christopher Schwartz
Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences
Advisor: Jason Robert Carter
Dissertation title: Omega-3 Fatty Acids and the Neurovascular Responses to Mental Stress in Humans

Matthew VanGrinsven
Master of Science in Geology
Advisor: Alex S Mayer
Thesis title: Estimation of Vertical Groundwater Fluxes into a Streambed through Continuous Temperature Profile Monitoring and the Relationship of Groundwater Fluxes to Coaster Brook Trout Spawning Habitat

Singaravelu Velayudham
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry
Advisor: Haiying Liu
Dissertation title: Conjugated Polymers and their Composite Material for Sensing Applications

Gregory Vosters
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Wayne W Weaver
Thesis title: Energy and Conductance State Modeling of Power Electronic Converters for DC Microgrids

Wenge Wei
Doctor of Philosophy in Civil Engineering
Advisor: David W Watkins
Dissertation title: Use of Hydroclimatic Forecasts for Improved Water Management in Central Texas

Kassidy Yatso
Master of Science in Applied Ecology
Co-Advisors: Catherine Sophia Tarasoff and Pekka Olavi Nygren
Thesis title: Planting and Production of Switchgrass (Panicumvirgatum L.) as a Bioenergy Crop in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

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New theses and dissertations available

The Graduate School is pleased to announce new theses and dissertations are now available in the J.R. van Pelt and Opie Library from the following programs:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Forestry
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physics


Christopher DeDene
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Zhanping You
Thesis title: Investigation of Using Waste Engine Oil Blended with Reclaimed Asphalt Materials to Improve Pavement Recyclability

Kyle Earnshaw
Master of Science in Forestry
Advisor: Blair D Orr
Thesis title: The Effects of Soil Moisture, Field-Scale Toposequential Position, and Slope on Yields in Irrigated Upland Rice Fields in Flores, Comayagua, Honduras

Michael Hochscheidt
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Stanley J Vitton
Thesis title: Cut Slope Design for the Access to an Underground Copper Mine

Nicholas Johnson
Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering
Advisor: Paul George Sanders
Thesis title: Processing and Mechanical Properties of Cast Aluminum Containing Scandium, Zirconium, and Ytterbium

Abdul Koroma
Doctor of Philosophy in Civil Engineering
Advisor: Ralph J Hodek
Dissertation title: An Evaluation of the Performance and Cost-Effectiveness of Pavement Sections Containing Open-Graded Base Courses

Chee Huei Lee
Doctor of Philosophy in Physics
Advisor: Yoke Khin Yap
Dissertation title: Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization, Functionalization, and Potential Applications

Tyler LeRoy
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Advisor: Jason R Blough
Thesis title: Muffler Characterization with Implementation of the Finite Element Method and Experimental Techniques

Aashish Poudel
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Daniel Robert Fuhrmann
Thesis title: Adaptive Sensing for Target Tracking Applications

Wen Nee Yeo
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering
Co-Advisors: Tony Neal Rogers and Bahne C Cornilsen
Dissertation title: Development and Testing of an Asymmetric Capacitor with a Nickel-Carbon Foam Positive Electrode

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