Tag Archives: Fall 2014

ME-EM Graduate Seminar: Human-Centered Monitoring: From Enabling Technology, Human Factor to Computational Diagnosis

oct2The ME-EM Graduate Seminar speaker on Thursday, October 2 at 4:00 in 103 EERC will be Dr. Ye (Sarah) Sun from Michigan Tech Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics Department.

The title of her presentation will be ‘Human-Centered Monitoring: From Enabling Technology, Human Factor to Computational Diagnosis’.

The rapidly growing population ageing is a global phenomenon in the recent decades. The concomitant prevalence of chronic diseases necessitates proactive, human-centered approaches to reduce the high cost and enhance the biocompatibility and operability of the current healthcare systems. For drivers at all ages, drowsiness is one of the most prevalent root causes of accidents. Driver health and state monitoring provides an effective way to reduce the risk of driver related crashes. This study aims to facilitate the development of human-centered monitoring in healthcare and transportation safety. A comprehensive framework for human-centered monitoring has been developed that includes three major components, i.e., enabling technology, human factor and computational diagnosis. In the technology part, this study establishes a non-intrusive and non-contact interface platform for human health and state monitoring. Unlike the conventional clinical bio-potential measurement system, the platform is able to acquire the electrophysiological signals with a gap between the skin and the electrodes that is occupied by hair, cloth, and air. The non-contact platform avoids skin irritation and allergic contact dermatitis and is suitable for long-term monitoring purpose. To increase the flexibility in practical application, a body area network has also been integrated for different scenarios such as driving and home monitoring. The developed enabling technology was validated using simulated driving scenario, since it constitutes a high stress and high risk condition, especially for people with chronic diseases. For the human factor part, analyses were conducted on the physiological data collected from the drivers operating a high fidelity driving simulator. This involves driver state analyses particularly related to drowsiness and mental stress. The computational component involved the development of algorithms to assess the robustness of different physiological indicators for the extent of driver fatigue. Moreover, physiological signals for mental stress were also investigated which will serve as the technical basis for timely assistance.

Dr. Ye (Sarah) Sun is an assistant professor in the Department of
Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics at Michigan Technological
University. She received her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering
from Case Western Reserve University. Her research is an
interdisciplinary resort that integrates engineering innovation with
human health and human behaviors. The primary focus is on
human-centered smart monitoring technologies that integrate advance
sensor technology and decision support to improve healthcare
and transportation safety.


ME-EM Graduate Seminar: Advances in Decoupling

sep25The ME-EM Graduate Seminar speaker on Thursday, September 25 at 4:00 in 103 EERC will be Dr. Daniel
Kawano from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology – Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics Department.

The title of his presentation will be ‘Advances in Decoupling’.

Under certain restrictions on system damping, the equations of motion for a linear vibratory system may be decoupled into independent equations that reveal characteristic vibrational behavior. This seminar presents recent advances in the theory of decoupling that allow a vibratory system with general viscous damping characteristics to be exactly decoupled by a real, time-varying, eigenvalue-preserving transformation that generalizes modal analysis. The underlying physics of this decoupling transformation is explained, and the decoupling methodologies for various vibratory systems are discussed.

Daniel Kawano is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana. He received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) in San Luis Obispo. Daniel obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering, with a focus in dynamical systems, from the University of California at Berkeley. His research and academic interests include modeling, analysis, simulation, and testing of dynamical systems; experimental modal analysis; numerical solution of differential and differential-algebraic equations; and pedagogy in engineering education. Daniel’s current research and activities involve exact decoupling of damped, linear vibratory systems,
and the use of online videos, web-based interactive demonstrations, and online
learning platforms to enhance student learning in dynamics. He is also the faculty advisor for Rose-Hulman’s Formula SAE competition team, Rose Grand Prix Engineering.

 

 


ME-EM Graduate Seminar: Applications of Electron Microscopy to Materials for Energy

sep18The ME-EM Graduate Seminar speaker on Thursday, September 18 at 4:00 in 103 EERC will be Dr. Dean Miller from Argonne National Laboratory.

The title of his presentation will be ‘Applications of Electron Microscopy to Materials for Energy’.

Electron microscopy has long been an important tool in understanding the structure and function of materials. Electron microscopy provides powerful capabilities for characterization of microstructure at the nanoscale. Likewise, focused ion beam instruments provide unique capability for preparation and interrogation of materials. In this presentation, several examples of the application of these approaches to energy related materials will presented. In fuel cell materials, quantitative three-dimensional reconstruction of microstructure through focused ion beam – scanning electron microscopy
has provided new insight into cathode performance. For Li-battery materials, we have developed a new way to follow structural evolution in single oxide cathode particles by in situ microscopy during electrochemical cycling that has shed new light on mechanisms for performance degradation. In high temperature superconductors, electron microscopy has revealed how subtle changes in chemistry during processing can have a profound influence on their ultimate performance. These examples illustrate some of the ways electron microscopy can provide unique and practical insight into the behavior of materials.

Dean Miller is a Senior Materials Scientist and Director of the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory. He received his B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering and Ph.D. in Materials Science, both from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. His research at Argonne focuses
on the characterization of complex electronic oxides including high-temperature superconductors, magnetic oxides, and advanced battery materials with a particular emphasis on characterization by electron beam methods.


ME-EM Graduate Seminar: In situ Nanoscale Testing to Validate and Elucidate Mechanism for Predictive Modeling

sep11The ME-EM Graduate Seminar speaker on Thursday, September 11 at 4:00 in 103 EERC will be Dr. Kahlid Hattar from Sandia National Laboratory. The title of his presentation will be ‘In situ Nanoscale Testing to Validate and Elucidate Mechanism for Predictive Modeling’.

Topic: In situ Nanoscale Testing to Validate and Elucidate Mechanism for Predictive Modeling

Predicting performance margins of complex systems requires the development of multiscale physics based models that incorporate potential processing, microstructure, and property variations. To create the necessary set of models, a fundamental understanding of the physics governing the associated materials interplay and response in the expected environments of operation is essential. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments validated by welldesigned bulk tests provide an excellent tool to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that govern the properties of materials exposed to various environmental conditions of interest.
This presentation will demonstrate the breadth of in situ TEM research capabilities that are now available to the materials science community. These capabilities will be highlighted through a set of three experimental examples. In the first set, both the detrimental and beneficial effects of ion irradiation in face-centered cubic metal will be demonstrated.
The detrimental effect will be shown through a detailed comparison of displacement damage on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high purity Cu whereas the beneficial effect will be presented for Au electrical contacts. Recent advancements in in situ TEM stages permit studies in gas and liquid environments. To demonstrate the potential of these stages, recent work done at Sandia to understand the uptake and release of hydrogen in nanoporous Pd nanoparticles and the nanoscale mechanisms of corrosion in high purity Fe will be shown. Finally, the presentation will highlight the ability of in situ ion irradiation studies to investigate the structural evolution of advanced nanoscale detectors under controlled radiation environments.
This research was partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Khalid Hattar is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff of Sandia National Laboratories. He
received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara in 2003, and a
Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2009.
He joined the Radiation-Solids Interaction group at Sandia in December 2008. He specializes in
determining the property-microstructure relationship
for a variety of structural, electrical, and optical
materials through in situ TEM in various extreme
environments.


ME-EM Graduate Seminar: From carbon nanotubes to crowd noise: An overview of interesting topics in acoustics

barnardThe ME-EM Graduate Seminar speaker on Thursday, September 4 at 4:00 in 103 EERC will be Dr. Andrew Barnard, Mechanical Engineering – Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University.

The title of his presentation will be ‘From carbon nanotubes to crowd noise: An overview of interesting topics in acoustics’.

Carbon nanotube (CNT) thin-films are ultra-lightweight, semi-transparent, flexible, and stretchable, films that can create sound through thermoacoustics. CNT thermophones have the potential to replace moving coil transducers and expand the applications of modern loudspeakers through “singing” fabrics. The fundamentals of CNT thermophone operation and key research challenges will be presented.
Underwater acoustics encompasses many disciplines and applications from Navy ships to oil exploration to climate change. Michigan Tech is located in an ideal location, on the shores of Lake Superior, to perform experimental underwater acoustics research through the Great Lakes Research Center (GLRC). Several topics in underwater acoustics will be discussed.
Transducer arrays and wavenumber domain signal processing provide a powerful way to visualize acoustic fields. An overview of techniques including supersonic intensity in reverberant environments (SIRE), and wavenumber processing of panel-to-panel transmission loss will be discussed. Current panel transmission loss (TL) measurement standards are woefully inadequate. Several test facilities can test the same specimen and the results can vary by more than 6 dB. Although panel TL theory is well developed, understanding of the fundamental measurement error is not. Insight into the field diffusivity in the source room will be discussed as well as paths towards an improved measurement standard. Smart controls systems are leading the way towards the realization of cyber-physical systems. An overview of the utility of FPGA-based control systems will be presented. These systems are particularly well suited for safety-critical control applications. Crowd noise is a much discussed topic in the mainstream media. Unfortunately most of the ad-hoc measurements that have been promoted are lacking in scientific rigor. Sound level measurements from Penn State football games will be presented to demonstrate how we can better measure this interesting phenomenon.

Dr. Andrew Barnard is a new assistant professor in the ME-EM department at Michigan Tech. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from MTU and a Ph.D. in Acoustics from Penn State. Dr. Barnard is Board Certified by the Institute for Noise Control Engineering and is a Certified LabVIEW Developer.
He spent the last 8 years working as a research faculty member at the Applied Research Laboratory at Penn State, specializing in structural acoustics. Dr. Barnard has general interests in mechanical vibration, noise control, and acoustics.
His specialties include dynamic test and measurement, underwater acoustic intensity, experimental modal analysis, room acoustics, acoustic material characterization, outdoor sound propagation, theoretical acoustics, signal processing, and real-time control systems. Other interests include loudspeaker design and fabrication, architectural acoustics, and engineering education.