Category: Research

Radio Signals, Diabetes, and Beavers: Just Another Graduate Research Colloquium (Yap Group)

Graduate students from across campus trotted out their research and explained the unexplainable at the latest Graduate Research Colloquium held at the Memorial Union Building, with more 25 posters accompanying the two days of presentations.

Suryabh Sharma, graduate student in electrical and computer engineering, discussed his work, which might not see the light of day for 20 to 25 years. His work is guided by Associate Professor Gerry Tian.

View the Tech Today article


Cloud Comments

Professor Raymond Shaw (Physics), is an author of a commentary published in this week’s issue of the journal “Science.” The topic is the need to better understand cloud processes and how that can be accomplished. The article entitled “Can We Understand Clouds Without Turbulence?” is published in the Perspectives section of the journal. The reference is E. Bodenschatz, S. P. Malinowski, R. A. Shaw, and F. Stratmann Science 19 February 2010: 970-971. The synopsis is “Advances at the interface between atmospheric and turbulence research are helping to elucidate fundamental properties of clouds.”


Yap’s Diva Article Picked Up by Numerous Media Outlets

http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=116239
http://www.physorg.com/news182705815.html
http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=14355.php
http://www.azonano.com/news.asp?newsID=15464
http://www.nanotechwire.com/news.asp?nid=9297
http://www.innovations-report.com/
http://www.sciencecodex.com/harnessing_the_divas_of_the_nanoworld
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/560385/?sc=rssn
http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1gTFo7/www.physorg.com/news182705815.html
http://www.nano.org.uk/news/index.php?article=345
…and many more.


Yap: Harnessing the Divas of the Nanoworld

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are the divas of the nanoworld. In possession of alluring properties, they are also notoriously temperamental compared to their carbon-based cousins.

On the plus side, they can withstand incredibly high heat, well over 1,100 degrees Celsius, says Yoke Khin Yap, an associate professor of physics at Michigan Technological University. “Carbon nanotubes would burn like charcoal in a barbecue at half of those temperatures,” he says. And the electrical properties of BNNTs are remarkably uniform. Perfect insulators, boron nitride nanotubes could be doped with other materials to form designer semiconductors that could be used in high-powered electronics.

View the Michigan Tech News article